Measles outbreak resources from BMJ Best Practice and BMJ Learning

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Following the recent outbreak of Measles in the UK, you may want to find out more about the disease.  One way of finding up to date information and evidence regarding the treatment and prevention of the disease is by logging on to BMJ Best Practice.

To login offsite:
NHS Staff should use their NHS Athens username and password
University Staff and students should use their institutional (Shibboleth) username and password.
(BMJ Best Practice mobile app is also available to University staff and students click here for further details.)

Below is the Best Practice summary of the disease, covering treatment and prevention details to help keep you up to date. If you want to read more on this please click here.

Best Practice Measles summary

Measles is an epidemic disease prevalent worldwide whose incidence has been curtailed markedly in countries where immunisation is widespread. It is characterised by cough, coryza, conjunctivitis, a characteristic exanthem, and a pathognomonic enanthem (Koplik spots). Measles is preventable by immunisation, but high levels of coverage are required to prevent outbreaks of disease. Treatment is primarily supportive, and complications of measles are more common in immunocompromised and poorly nourished individuals and include pneumonia, laryngotracheitis, otitis media, and encephalitis.

You can view the Best Practice Prevention information on measles here, or Treatment information here.

 Other Recently updated Best Practice topics

Wrinkles
Gout
Cellulitis
Acute tubular necrosis
Brief psychotic disorder
For the latest 50 updated topics added to Best Practiceclick here.

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In addition you might also be interested in the following Free BMJ Learning Modules on measles…

Measles: an update on diagnosis and management
Childhood immunisation: an update

BMJ Learning is offering its modules on the subject for free for one month only

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