Quick Look: NICE Guidance

quicklook

nice logo

Name: NICE Guidance

Publisher: National Institute for Health and Care Excellence

Devices:
Android: requires Android 4.0 and up.
iPhone/iPad: iOS 6.0 or later. App size: 5.8MB
*We tested this on an iPad*

Available from:      Google Play , iTunes and Windows

Price: Free

Type of information:  The app provides mobile access to NICE guidelines for healthcare professionals and students. The evidence-based guidelines offer current pathways for the diagnoses, prognosis and treatment of many health problems. There are hundreds of conditions and diseases covered, as well as different public health topics.

Main pros: 

  • Easy to use
  • Clean interface
  • Official guidelines from NICE
  • Handy mobile tool

Main cons:  

  • Text heavy
  • Limited personalisation features

The updated NICE Guidance app from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence offers on-the-move guidance for healthcare professionals and students. With over 760 topics and guidelines, as well as thousands of individual chapters, the app is text heavy. However, the in-app search box makes it easy to extract information quickly. The app also allows users to browse by topic and by guideline type.

The app is available through NICE and provides access to official NICE evidence-based guidelines which are used to keep health and social care professionals up-to-date on pathways in diagnosing and treating health problems. The information within the app is of a high-quality. Sections include clinical guidelines, cancer service guidelines and public health guidelines. One of the most beneficial features is the new and updated guidance section. New guidelines will automatically update on your device to keep you informed of any developments within healthcare guidelines.

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The app’s interface is uncluttered and easily navigable. You can also personalise the app, although these features are limited. Individual chapters can be bookmarked for use offline, which is useful for keeping track of specialist areas of interest. However, the text cannot be highlighted or annotated.

This app is a good aid for speedy and accurate guidance for the busy healthcare worker, but don’t expect more than what it says on the tin. Overall, the app is intuitive and easy to use and could be a handy mobile tool to have in your pocket!

All posts on this blog are subject to the St George’s Library Disclaimer, please take the time to read it carefully.

Updated: Aug 2017

 

Reduced Opening Hours in August

From Tuesday 1 August to Thursday 31 August, the library opening hours are:

Monday to Friday: 8am – 11pm
Saturday and Sunday: 9am – 9pm

The Library is staffed:
Monday to Friday: 8am – 6pm

Outside of staffed hours, the library operates as self-service.

The Research Enquiries Desk will be open:
Monday to Friday: 12pm – 2pm

The IT Clinic will be open:
Monday 12-2pm
Wednesday 12-2pm

How to find Open Access articles

There are various tools to help you find open access versions of articles that are otherwise only available with a subscription to the journal (or by paying an access fee). These include:

  • OA DOI (https://oadoi.org/): If you know the DOI (digital object identifier) of the article you’re looking for, you can paste it onto the end of this web address to find open access versions of the article.
  • Unpaywall (http://unpaywall.org/): This is a browser extension for Firefox and Google Chrome. Once you’ve installed it, any time you find an article behind a paywall, you can click on the padlock icon on the right hand side of the screen and be taken straight to an open access version of the article, if there’s one available.
  • Open Access Button (https://openaccessbutton.org/): a similar tool to Unpaywall, this also allows you to search for an article directly from their website and request copies of articles from authors.
  • Canary Haz (http://www.canaryhaz.com/): a new tool, currently being tested, which as well as finding open access versions of articles can also help access content the library has subscribed to whilst off campus, and link from the pre-print to the final published version of an article. Sign up required for free service, company will be making a premium version available.

For more information on Open Access have a look at the Library Open Access FAQs

Changes to library doors

DoorDue to the large volume of noise-related complaints received by the Library over this academic year, we have made some alterations to two access routes within the space. Firstly, and most significantly, is the main library entrance. The glass sliding doors have now been locked, and a push panel swing door has been installed to the right of the original doors. We hope this will greatly reduce the noise transference from the area outside the Library to the study areas, and make for a more conducive study environment.

In addition to this, the manual door between the group study area and the large silent study area has been converted into a fire exit only door. Once again, we have carried out this work in order to reduce the noise transference between these two study spaces.

We value your feedback and comments so please do contact us via an email to library@sgul.ac.uk

Information Skills Training Sessions July – Sept 2017

Dates for our July – Sept 2017 Information Skill Training Sessions are below. Please see our information skills training page for full details and range of sessions available. Contact liaison@sgul.ac.uk to book a session

*New*  Finding the evidence

Finding top quality evidence is a priority for health care practitioners. This new session will introduce the high quality resources available to you as well as provide training in how to use them effectively to support evidence-based clinical practice or decision-making.
Recommended for: NHS staff

Thurs 20th July 15.00 – 17.00
Thurs 24th August 15.00 – 17.00
Tues 12th September 10.00 – 12.00

*New*  Twitter for Promotions

You will learn how to use Twitter for promotional purposes, find out about useful Twitter functions and tools such as Hootsuite and Storify.
Recommended for: Useful for anyone involved in a team or department Twitter account, or thinking of creating one.
Requirements: Users should be familiar with Twitter, as there will be a hands on element to the session.

Tues 15th August 12.00 -13.30

Introduction to critical appraisal
Thurs 27th July 15.00-16.30

Systematic Reviews – Finding and managing the evidence
Weds 19th July 13.00 -16.00
Weds 23rd August 10.00-13.00
Tues 19th September 13.00- 16.00

Getting Started with Twitter
Mon 31st July 12.00 – 13.30

Library Inductions for NHS Staff

Thurs 20th July 10.00 – 11.00
Thurs 17th August 10.00 – 11.00
Thurs 21st September 10.00 – 11.00

Personalised training

If you cannot make any of the times, we are happy to arrange sessions for either individual or larger groups depending on your needs. To organise a bespoke session please email us at liaison@sgul.ac.uk

The Dissection of an Egyptian Mummy at St George’s Hospital Medical School

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Our archivist Carly Manson has been looking more in depth into the history of St George’s. One of the interesting stories that you may not know about, is that the med school once dissected a mummy!


 

egyptian mummy

1835 saw the opening ceremony of St George’s Hospital Medical School. It also saw the opening of an ancient Egyptian mummy, in the hopes of impressing an expectant crowd.

Physicians and surgeons were permitted to have a limited number of pupils in the early days of St George’s Hospital, but there was no established medical school. Students would travel to various places for the different studies needed in their professional education.  A medical school was eventually formed in 1831, and established on Kinnerton Street in 1834, a few minutes walk from the hospital at Hyde Park Corner in central London.

According to The Lancet, one of the world’s oldest general medical journals, there was an official opening of the St George’s Hospital Medical School at Kinnerton Street in July 1835. To attract visitors to the opening, it was advertised that an Egyptian mummy was to be dissected in front of the audience in the new Anatomical Theatre.

The mummy was said to have been a high ranking lady who belonged to the Temple of Ammon in Thebes.  Its exterior casing was ornate and varnished black, while the inner casing was made of sycamore wood covered with hieroglyphics which acknowledged the Egyptian deities.

It was announced that the mummy had been gifted to the school by the high ranking Lord Frederick Fitzclarence. But according to the ‘intercepted letters’ section of The Lancet article, a Mr Turner stated that the mummy was actually an old present to Mr Robert Keate, the hospital Surgeon:

“You would notice in your card of invitation, that the mummy was presented to the school by no less than Sir Frederick Fitzclarence, but on inquiring I found that, like Brodie’s other trickeries, it had not been presented to the school at all, but that Lord Fitz had given it to Bobby Keate ages ago.” (Wakley, 1835)

Unfortunately, The Lancet goes on to state that “the mummy gave more than the usual trouble to Mr P. and his assistants, and, after all, presented nothing singular to gratify the eye or the curiosity…. All appearance of flesh was destroyed, and the corpse looked like a skeleton dipped in pitch.” (Wakley, 1835)

Not everyone was disappointed by the event, The Lancet cites Mr Turner as stating “I do not regret going, as it turned out to be a fine intellectual comedy” (Wakley, 1835).  Despite the Lancet’s somewhat negative article, news spread of the opening, and the American Railroad Journal acclaimed that “much curiosity has been excited in the scientific world by the opening of a mummy”. (Minor, 1835)

First programme for medical school
Prospectus for a course of lectures on anatomy at the St George’s Hospital Medical School at Kinnerton Street for 1837-1838

For further information relating to the history of St George’s Hospital and the medical school, please contact the Archivist at archives@sgul.ac.uk or go to the following webpage: http://library.sgul.ac.uk/using-the-library/archives

Did you know…

The word ‘dissection’ originates from the Latin ‘dissecare’, meaning ‘to cut to pieces’. Dissection, also known as ‘anatomisation’, has been used for centuries to explore the body of a deceased animal or plant to study its internal structures and functions. Dissection is still practised in medical schools worldwide, although computer models are also increasingly used to teach anatomy. One resource that St George’s Library currently subscribes to is Acland’s Anatomy, an accessible online tool with realistic 3D visuals.


Reference list

Wakley, T. (ed.) (July 1835), ‘Kinnerton Street School’, The Lancet, vol. II, pp.457-463

Minor, D.K. (ed.) (August 1835) The American Railroad Journal, and Advocate of Internal Improvements, Vol 4. no 33, pp.526