DMPOnline for St George’s University researchers

This post has been written by Liz Stovold, Research Data Support Manager and Information Specialist, Cochrane Airways.

A data management plan (DMP) is an important part of a research project and many funders require a DMP as part of a research proposal. A DMP will typically cover issues such as data collection, format, storage, security, documentation, discoverability, reuse, sharing, retention and preservation. Thinking through these issues before embarking on your research will help to improve the organisation of your data throughout the lifecycle of your research and save you time in the long run.

To help you with writing your data management plan, St George’s subscribes to DMPonline – a tool provided by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC). To access DMPonline you simply need to log in with your St George’s credentials:

Screenshot of the DMPOnline website sign in page. Select "sign in with your institutional credentials".

From the dashboard, click on ‘create plan’ and off you go!

Screenshot of creating a plan option. From the dashboard, click on the "create plan" link.

Detailed guidance is available in the help tab, together with links to a wealth of resources on data management planning and examples of data management plans. You can also look at publicly shared DMPs from the reference tab:

Screenshot of public DMPs which can serve as guidance for your own. Select Reference from the top menu and then click on public DMPs.

Using DMPOnline to write your DMP offers a number of benefits:

  • access to funder specific templates
  • built-in guidance for each section of the plan
  • invite your collaborators to join the plan
  • add comments for your collaborators
  • option to request feedback on your plan from the SGUL Research Data Management Service
  • export your plan in a variety of formats including MS Word and PDF
  • option to keep your plan private, share with SGUL DMPOnline users, or share publicly

Further reading

Jones, S. (2011). ‘How to Develop a Data Management and Sharing Plan’. DCC How-to Guides. Edinburgh: Digital Curation Centre. Available online: https://www.dcc.ac.uk/guidance/how-guides/develop-data-plan (accessed 6 August 2021).

DCC. (2013). Checklist for a Data Management Plan.v.4.0. Edinburgh: Digital Curation Centre. Available online: http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/data-management-plans (accessed 6 August 2021).


If you would like further support with developing your plan then please do get in touch at: researchdata@sgul.ac.uk

Visit SGUL Research Data Management for general information and guidance about research data management.

Welcome video 2021

If you are joining us this autumn, have a look at our Welcome video.  

We give you our top five tips on making the most of the library, our services and resources while you are studying at St George’s. 

And…there might even be a bonus tip! 

Induction Quiz 

Don’t forget to do our library induction quiz on Canvas. It is part of your Getting Started module and you can also find it here

If you have any questions about using the library, don’t hesitate to get in touch by emailing liaison@sgul.ac.uk 

Introducing the Big Read 2021

For the third year, St George’s University is organising its very own Big Read. What is the Big Read? We’re so glad you asked…

Decorative logo for the Big Read at St George's, University of London.

The Big Read is a shared reading project, aimed at bringing new and returning students, academic and professional staff across the university together to foster community and belonging. Each year, we pick a book we think makes for an engaging read, with lots of interesting topics to discuss with colleagues and friends.

The Big Read webpages are now live.

This year’s pick

We are very excited about having chosen The Private Joys of Nnenna Maloney, the debut novel of Okechukwu Nzelu for this year’s Big Read. It is a coming-of-age story set in Manchester and Cambridge and it explores topics like going to university, race, class and sexuality. The author has managed to discuss complex and at times difficult themes with humour and warmth.

You can find out more about the book and watch the author’s message for everyone participating in the Big Read here on our website.

How to get your free copy

If you are a returning student or staff at St George’s, you can now pick up your copy from the library helpdesk between 8am and 6pm, Monday to Friday. But be quick – there is a limited number!

If you are new to St George’s, you will get your copy when you enrol. Our Big Read team will be on hand to give out books and answer your questions at the enrolment hub.

Book cover for The Private Joys of Nnenna Maloney by Okechukwu Nzelu.

What’s on?

We are busy preparing a range of exciting events for you including discussions with experts around themes such as transitioning to university, race and LGBTQ+ identities. There will be book clubs, creative writing workshops and the author will come to St George’s for a live event too. We will publish the schedule of events soon. In the meantime, why not sign up to our mailing list to be the first to hear about what’s on offer.

An Assassination in the Archive

Opening Up the Body’ is a Wellcome-funded project to conserve the Post Mortem Examinations and Case Books of St George’s Hospital, 1841-1946. Our Archive team have been cataloguing and digitising records dating from 1841-1921. This post was written by Project Archivist Natasha Shillingford.

While cataloguing the 1909 volume of post mortem case books of St George’s Hospital, we came across the post mortem examination of Cawas Lalcaca, a Medico. The cause of death was listed as ‘Bullet wound in back perforating lung, diaphragm, liver, mesentery, intestines and ilium. 2nd bullet wound in right chest.’  The medical case notes record that the ‘Patient was murdered on July 1 at the same time as Sir William Curzon Wyllie at the Imperial Institute by an Indian fanatic named Dhingra, who was subsequently executed at Pentonville.’

Photo of post mortem PM/1909/223.
PM/1909/223. Archives and Special Collections, St George’s, University of London

What happened on that fateful night to result in the murder of two men?

A reception had been given at the Imperial Institute on behalf of the National Indian Association. It was attended by Lieutenant-Colonel Sir William Hutt Curzon Wyllie, K.C.I.E, C.V.O, Political Aide-de-Camp to Viscount Morley, Secretary of State for India and his wife, Lady Wyllie.

The Globe newspaper reported on the 2nd July that “The occasion passed without incident until the close of proceedings. Sir Curzon was descending the staircase prior to leaving, Lady Wyllie having, in the meantime, descended to the cloakroom to fetch her wraps. Descending the staircase near Sir Curzon was Dr. Cawas Lalcaca.

Then suddenly, in the twinkling of an eye as it were, and to the stupefaction of those around, shots rang out, and Sir Curzon fell on his back on the stairs. An Indian student was standing in front holding a smoking revolver. One bullet had shattered Sir Curzon’s right eye; another bullet had pierced his face just below the other eye. Dr. Cawas Lalcaca fell with a bullet through his chest.”

There were a number of doctors among the guests, and they attended the victims, but “it was at once seen, however, that Sir Curzon’s fate was sealed and life was certified to be extinct. In the case of Dr. Cawas Lalcaca hopes were entertained of his ultimate recovery, and he was conveyed to St George’s Hospital, but died almost immediately.”

An eyewitness at the scene said that Dr. Lalcaca had previously been speaking to Sir Curzon Wyllie, and he was “of the opinion that he must have noticed the actions of the assassin just as he was about to fire, and thrust himself before Sir Curzon Wyllie, and thus received his death wound.”

Photo of post moretem PM/1909/223
PM/1909/223. Archives and Special Collections, St George’s, University of London

The morbid appearances in the post mortem examination at St George’s Hospital reveal the extent of Dr. Lalcaca’s injuries. The external description of the body describes the locations and entry of the bullets.

Meanwhile, the assassin was apprehended at the scene and escorted to Walton Street Police Station. The Globe newspaper reported that “the prisoner, stated to be a Parsee, is apparently about 25 years of age. Not of powerful physique, but mild-mannered, cool and self-possessed, his hair black, he was wearing gold spectacles, and a turban, which in the enactment of the tragedy fell off.” The motive of the crime was believed to be political, and in addition to the revolver which he fired, he had a further revolver, a long knife and a dagger on his person. His name was given as Madan Lal Dhingra, a student in Engineering at University College.

The Globe newspaper reported that when asked if he had anything to say, the prisoner replied, “The only thing I want to say is there was no wilful murder in the case of Dr. Lalcaca. I did not know him at all. When he advanced to take me I only fired in self-defence.”

An inquest on the body of Dr. Lalcaca was held at Westminster Coroner’s Court and was reported in the London and China Express, 9th July 1909.

It stated that Dr. Lalcaca was a native of Allahabad but resided in Bombay, later at Shanghai. He was a doctor of medicine and had been in England since June 8th. A friend described him as a “fine looking Indian, slightly over medium height, with a handsome bronze countenance, of a genial bearing, and refined appearance.”

The Coroner stated that it was a clear case of wilful murder by Dhingra or Dr. Lalcaca. He said that it was true that Dhingra stated that his intentions were not against Dr. Lalcaca and it was an act of self-defence, but that was not an excuse for murder. The Jury returned a verdict of ‘Wilful Murder’.

So, what was Dhingra’s motive for the attack on Curzon? The Christchurch Times reported on 10th July 1909 that a brother of Dhingra had written to Sir Curzon Wyllie asking if he would offer Dhingra some advice, as “the family feared he was getting into a dangerous circle.” Sir Curzon apparently did write to Dhingra, and advised him in a tactful manner, but Dhingra resented this advice and clearly indicated this in a letter sent to Sir Curzon.

It was also said that Dhingra had attempted to kill George Curzon, Viceroy of India and had planned to assassinate the ex-Governor of Bengal. Wyllie’s presence at events with Indian students, made him an easier target for assassination.

Dinghra was tried at the Old Bailey on 23rd July. He stated that “Whatever I did was an act of patriotism and justice which was justified. The only thing I have to say is in the statement which I believe you have got,” and he pleaded not guilty to the indictment. The Bicester Herald published Dhingra’s statement on 20th August 1909. He wished it to be read at the trial, but permission was refused. “I admit the other day I attempted to shed English blood as an humble revenger for the inhuman hangings and deportations of patriotic youths. In this attempt I have consulted none but my own conscience. I have conspired with none but my own duty.” He continued, “I believe that a nation held down by foreign bayonet is in a perpetual state of war, since open battle is rendered impossible to a disarmed race. I attacked by surprise; since guns were denied me I drew forth my pistol and fired…The only lesson required in India at present is to learn how to die, and the only way to teach it is by dying ourselves. Therefore I died, and glory in my martyrdom.”

For the murder of Sir Curzon Wyllie and Dr. Lalcaca, Madan Lal Dhingra was hanged at Pentonville prison on 17th August 1909.

The funeral of Dr. Cawas Lalcaca took place at Brookwood Cemetery, the only Parsee burial place within the metropolitan district. The London and China Express described the ceremony at the graveside as ‘short, simple and impressive. The coffin was covered with floral tributes. It was placed on a bier and drawn to the Fire Temple of the Parsees. When the coffin was taken into the building a fire of sandalwood and frankincense was lighted on the altar, on either side of which burned also a candle. The interment took place in a plain grace, and after the body had been taken from the temple, most of those present placed a small piece of sandalwood in the flames on the altar.”

The British Medical Journal reported that the floral tributes were particularly beautiful, and “conspicuous among them was a wreath from Lady Wyllie inscribed: ‘These flowers are sent by the wife of Sir Curzon Wyllie, in ever grateful remembrance of the brave and noble man who lost his life on the night of July 1st in trying to save her beloved husband and others, with deepest sympathy.’”


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Summer Holiday Library Update

Photo by Vicko Mozara on Unsplash

The recent weather has let us know that summer is finally upon us, and with the last of our student groups finishing exams in the next few days, we’re sure that many people’s thoughts are now turning to the summer holiday. Below we’ve highlighted a small selection of our services and resources that we hope will be helpful to you over the coming months, whether you’re studying or taking a moment to relax.

E-books

Hunter now gives access to over 5000 e-books to help with your studies, and this collection is continuing to grow. So whatever the topic of your assignment or research, it’s increasingly likely that you’ll find e-books that can help.

To find e-books, select Books and more from the dropdown box when you search in Hunter. Then choose Online Resources from the filter options on the left to limit your results to e-books only.

View our YouTube video for a quick reminder of how to access e-books (and other online resources) from off-campus using your SGUL username and password.

Resetting your SGUL password

If your SGUL password has expired, or if you’ve forgotten it, you can reset it here as long as you’ve previously registered an alternate email address. If you haven’t registered an alternate adress, contact the Student Life Centre to set one up.

If you have problems resetting you password, email ITAV@sgul.ac.uk.

Reading for Pleasure

If you’ve been in the library recently, you may have spotted our Summer Reading display filled with books from our growing collection of fiction, poetry and contemporary non-fiction. Coming soon will be another reading for pleasure display, this one using a new collection of uplifting titles chosen by NHS staff in collaboration with The Reading Agency. Find out which titles will be available at The Reading Agency’s website here.

Please help yourself to anything from the book display using the nearby self-issue machines.

For more inspiration, take a look at some of our book collections in Wakelet such as the Mood-Boosting, Black History Month, St George’s Big Read and LGBT+ collections. Each entry links to the catalogue so you can check a book’s availability and find it on the shelves.

Items in these collections are mostly print books only, so if you’re heading away from SGUL for the summer and are thinking of picking up a book or two, remember to do this before you go.

Research support in summer

Believe it or not, summer is a busy time for your liaison librarians as we are preparing for the next academic year, developing and updating training sessions, recording videos, preparing inductions and getting new resources and tools ready for all come the autumn. Nevertheless, we will be available all summer to help students, researchers and academics. We can help with searching Hunter, our library catalogue, using databases to do complexes searches and show you how to make the most of RefWorks, the reference management software at St George’s. Email us at liaison@sgul.ac.uk for help. If you require more in-depth support, we can schedule an online appointment with you.

If you want to get a head start for next year, check out our Libguide on literature searching and our video series on how to search Ovid databases, such as Medline. We have many more how-to videos on our YouTube channel.

From the archives: International students at St George’s

In this blogpost, written by Archivist Juulia Ahvensalmi, we will be looking at the international history of St George’s students.

St George’s Medical School was formally established in 1834, but the hospital, which was opened in 1733, took pupils long before that. There were also several anatomical schools closely associated with the St George’s, including John Hunter’s Great Windmill Street school (established by John’s brother William Hunter in 1745), and Samuel Lane’s School of Anatomy and Medicine adjoining St George’s Hospital; John Hunter was a surgeon at St George’s, and Lane had also studied at St George’s.

There were fees to pay, and students could study for various lengths of time. The early student records show that some students only enrolled for a three-month period, others for six or 12 months. Initially pupils were assigned to a particular surgeon or physician. To become a perpetual pupil, there was an additional fee (which in 1870 was 100 guineas), and allowed the student admission to the practice of the physicians and surgeons of the hospital and all the lectures, allowing them to compete for any prizes and to become clinical clerks and dressers. The high fees then (as now) meant that education was not available for everyone, and the majority of the students were from the upper middle classes; many had gone to public schools and Cambridge or Oxford before attending St George’s.

Photo of 1805 student register.
Student register 1805, showing students enrolled for various lengths of time under different surgeons. Register of Pupils and House Officers 1756-1837, SGHMS/4/1/16, Archives & Special Collections, St George’s, University of London; and Extract from student register, 1945, showing the schools and colleges attended by student prior to their enrolment at St George’s. Register of Pupils 1837-1946, SGHMS/4/1/18, Archives & Special Collections, St George’s, University of London.

International connections

The student records held in the archives reveal a steady trickle of international students, based on their names (which in these early records is often the only information recorded). Names, of course, can only be used as a starting point, but the records also occasionally explicitly refer to visiting students, as in the case of Michal Astrashapovitch and Stephen Koniwetsky, who paid £20 to study under Everard Home and attend the lectures ‘for an uncertain time, to be settled at their leaving England’. There is no more information about them, but they may have been Russian – there are several other Russian names which suggests some regular contact or connection.

Photo of 1808 student register, showing enrolment of Michal Astrashapovitch and Stephen Koniwetsky.
Student register 1808, showing enrolment of Michal Astrashapovitch and Stephen Koniwetsky. SGHMS/4/1/16, Archives & Special Collections, St George’s, University of London.

Another early student was Philip Syng Physick, who had graduated from the University of Pennsylvania, and travelled to England to study under John Hunter in 1785. Known as the ‘father of American surgery’, he is said to have performed the first human blood transfusion, and was particularly interested in using autopsy as a method for observation and discovery – a practice that we can time and again see in our post mortem records.

Swedish names also appear in the registers with some regularity, especially in the 1890s when it appears to have been somewhat of a trend to travel to London to study medicine. These students include Henning Grenander, who later gained fame as a figure skater, winning the world title at the National Skating Palace in London in 1898.

Image of Henning Grenander ice skating.
Henning Grenander. Image: skateguard1.blogspot.com

Henrik Kellgren’s ‘Swedish Institution for the Cure of Diseases by Manual Treatment’in Eton Square, London appears to have further encouraged Swedish students to study in London: Axel Wolter Louis Stackelberg, who was a pupil at Kellgren’s institute, for instance, is enrolled for 6 months as a student of anatomy in 1897, while both Kellgren’s sons Ernst and Jonas also studied at St George’s for a period; Jonas went on to study rheumatism, was a pioneer in the study of physiology of pain, and became a professor of rheumatology in Manchester in 1953.

The adventures of Hajji Baba of Ispahan

Hajee Baba may have been the first Muslim student at St George’s, and one of the first Iranian medical practitioners to study in Europe in this period. He came to England to study medicine alongside another young Iranian, Muhammad Kazim or Mohammed Cassim, in 1811 with the British ambassador to Iran, Sir Harford Jones. Hajee Baba was the son of an officer in the Shah’s army, and the sending of students to study in Britain was seen as a way of strengthening the diplomatic ties and connections between the countries; his brother trained as a mining engineer in Russia. Kazim was to study arts, but died shortly after their arrival in England.

Hajee Baba stayed in England for eight years. Following his studies, he returned to Iran to work as a physician in the court in Teheran, and in 1835 he is described as ‘a respectable elderly looking man’. He also worked as an interpreter for Persian missions abroad. Eventually he became the chief physician to the shah. He died in 1842 or 1843.

Composite image. From left to right: photo of 1817 student register, Cover of ‘The Adventures of Hajji Baba of Ispahan’ (1824-28) by James Justinian Morier; Poster for ‘The Adventures of Hajji Baba’ (1954).
Student register 1817, Register of Pupils and House Officers 1756-1837, SGHMS/4/1/16, Archives & Special Collections, St George’s, University of London; Cover of ‘The Adventures of Hajji Baba of Ispahan’ (1824-28) by James Justinian Morier; Poster for ‘The Adventures of Hajji Baba’ (1954), Wikipedia, ©20th Century Studios.

He may have been the inspiration for a series of best-selling novels, ‘The Adventures of Hajji Baba of Ispahan’ (1824-28) by James Justinian Morier, secretary to Sir Harford Jones; Hajee Baba was reportedly annoyed at Morier’s use of his name for this purpose (and would have been, we can imagine, even more annoyed by the American adventure film of the same name of 1954!).  Nile Green’s book ‘The Love of Strangers: What Six Muslim Students Learned in Jane Austen’s England’ (2016) recounts the story of a group of six students who travelled to Britain in 1815, based on contemporary diaries and letters of the students, in which he also mentions Hajee Baba and his unfortunate companion.

The problem of sources…

Often, the spelling of names varies considerably in different sources (this is of course particularly true when the original is in a different script), which can make tracking people difficult (but we do enjoy a bit of detective work!); there is a Wikipedia entry for Hajee Baba, for instance, but in that his name is spelled Hadji Baba Ashfar, whilst the Encyclopaedia Iranica uses the form Ḥājjī Bābā Afšār; in Persian his name is افشار، حاجی بابا.

Many students are also entered in the registers only by their first initial and surname, making identification even more problematic. A ‘foreign-sounding’ name, moreover, is of course not solid evidence either way – the somewhat exotic-sounding Peregrine Fernandez in 1799, for instance, ‘gentleman of Widcombe, Somerset’, may have had family roots elsewhere, but was born and bred in London. Where the student records are simply lists of names, as the earlier ones are, we have to turn to other sources to find out more about the people behind the names.

Image of Assaad Y. Kayat. Source: ‘A Voice from Lebanon with the Life and Travels of Assaad Y. Kayat’ (1847).
Image of Assaad Y. Kayat. Source: ‘A Voice from Lebanon with the Life and Travels of Assaad Y. Kayat’ (1847).

One student we do know more about is Assaad Kayat, who enrolled as a student at St George’s in 1843, studying alongside Henry Gray (of Gray’s Anatomy). His fascinating story is recounted in more detail in an earlier blogpost, and his autobiography tells us a lot about his childhood in Beirut, as well as his and his wife’s experiences as immigrants in London.

The archives also reveal the story of Boghos Baghdasan Tahmisian, who, according to an appeal launched in 1892 by the Turkish Mission’s Aid Society, was a ‘native of Cilicia’, in present-day Turkey; his name may suggest Armenian origins. He is in the appeal described as a diligent student, who had arrived in London in 1889 and enrolled as a medical student at St George’s. He had, however, found himself lacking adequate funds to be able to finish his studies, which is why the society decided to appeal to the public on his behalf.

Composite image. Left-hand side: ‘An appeal on behalf of Mr B.B. Tahmisian’ (1892). Right-hand side: a letter signed by Tahmisian.
‘An appeal on behalf of Mr B.B. Tahmisian’ (1892) and a letter signed by Tahmisian. Archives and Special Collections, St George’s, University of London.

Pictorial propaganda

Following the end of the First World War, the Universities Bureau of the British Empire (now Association of Commonwealth Universities), established in 1913, encouraged British universities to admit students, and the Foreign Office was eager to distribute what they called ‘pictorial propaganda’:

‘The idea is to endeavour to impress the peoples of Russia and of the East with the greatness of the educational system of the British Empire’

Photo of letters to the Medical School, preserved in the minute books of the Medical School Committee XII-XIII.
Letters to the Medical School, preserved in the minute books. Minutes of the Medical School Committee XII-XIII, SGHMS/1/1/1/15. Archives and Special Collections, St George’s, University of London.

‘This medical school is unable to admit any Ceylonese students’

(Medical School minute books, 1920)

The minute books of the medical school from that time contain frequent references to the admission (or not, as it were) of international students; the minutes refer to students by their nationalities: ‘a Pole’, ‘the Siamese doctor’, ‘a native of India’.

At times, certain nationalities were the subject of intense conversations. Following the end of the First World War and demobilisation, many ‘American and colonial’ soldiers found themselves with some time to spare, and willing to use that time to study. A letter from the Royal Society of Medicine in 1918 warns that if plans to offer brief post-graduate courses for such students are not soon put in place, ‘the chances are that the majority of them will go to Paris, where […] post-graduate courses have been arranged for all Allied Officers and are already in full swing!’. The response from St George’s was not enthusiastic due to staff shortages and bureaucratic burden on the school. In the end, however, it was decided that up to 10 American students could be admitted for a three-month course, with a fee of ten guineas.

Appeals from the Egyptian Educational Mission received an even less favourable response: despite admitting two Egyptian students for a clinical course, ‘it was decided that this School cannot bind itself to admit any definite number of Egyptians’, the dean at this time wrote, suggesting that the school is too small to admit ‘foreign students […] although I am doubtful whether they ever really amalgamate or attempt to settle down with their fellow-students’.

At the moment we’re looking forward to delving into our nursing records and learning more about the student nurses at St George’s. Our initial research suggests that in the 1950s-1960s for instance up to 70% of the nursing students were immigrants to the UK; among these are many from the Windrush generation, and students came from all over the world, including the Caribbean, Ireland, India, Nigeria, Sweden and Bermuda.

Photo showing nursing students' nationality in 1970s student records.
Records of nursing students at St George’s in the 1970s. Archives and Special Collections, St George’s, University of London.

Want to know more, or see and study the records for yourself? Just get in touch with us at archives@sgul.ac.uk – we’d be very happy to hear from you!


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If you are interested receiving updates from the Library and the St George’s Archives project, you can subscribe to the Library Blog using the Follow button or click here for further posts from the Archives.

Mental Health Awareness Week – Reading to support wellbeing

It is Mental Health Awareness Week from 10th to 16th May and this year the Mental Health Foundation has chosen nature as the theme.

This is our second blogpost for Mental Health Awareness Week. To find out about your library team’s thoughts on what nature means to them and their wellbeing in words and pictures, have a look at our previous blogpost. Check out the hashtag #ConnectwithNature on social media. We will be sharing posts around Mental Health Awareness Week all week on TwitterFacebook and Instagram.

Decorative image of person reading in a field.

A great way to support your mental wellbeing is through reading. Especially during busy periods such as exam and essay writing weeks, it is important that you take time away from work to just relax.

Reading a good novel or poetry can certainly help with that which is why the library has developed a whole collection around reading for pleasure. In addition to medical and healthcare textbooks, we also have books you might find in any public library: good novels, poetry and contemporary non-fiction for when you want to take a break from your studies.

Some highlights from our reading for pleasure collection around the theme of nature are listed below.

  • Step by Step: The Life in My Journeys by Simon Reeve. Find out the shelf mark here. The author talks about his own mental health struggles and how he has found wellbeing in walking some of the most remote parts of the world. Perfect for adventurers!
  • Feral: Rewilding the land, the sea and human life by George Monbiot. Find out the shelf mark here. An environmental journalist talks about the importance of rewilding in the UK and across the world, reengaging with nature and discovering a new way of life which is much more in tune with nature.
  • The sun and her flowers by Rupi Kaur. Find the shelf mark here. A beautiful collection of poems in which the natural world plays a big role.
  • Dream Work by Mary Oliver. Find the shelf mark here. One of the finest contemporary poets, Mary Oliver who won a Pulitzer Prize, writes about the natural world with reverence and playfulness. This collection focuses on the work of self-exploration.
Decorative image of person reading on a bench outside.

Reading a good novel or poetry can certainly help with that which is why the library has developed a whole collection around reading for pleasure. In addition to medical and healthcare textbooks, we also have books you might find in any public library: good novels, poetry and contemporary non-fiction for when you want to take a break from your studies.

Specific Wakelets, or lists, we have created, that you might find interesting in this regard are books for Health and Wellbeing , Mood-Boosting books and the Big Read collection.

Resources for nurses at St George’s library

To mark this year’s Nurses Day, we have compiled a brief guide to some of the resources that can help to guide and support the amazing work that nurses do each and every day.

Books

A wide range of print and electronic books are available from the library at St George’s. Below are some lists of available titles on a selection of nursing specialties or nursing-related topics:

To access any of the e-books included in the above lists, you will need an NHS OpenAthens account. If you don’t already have one, you can easily register online. This also provides access to most of the journals, databases and other useful resources noted below.

Websites and online resources

The Royal Marsden Manual of Clinical and Cancer Nursing Procedures, is available online with your OpenAthens account.

A series of training videos on a range of topics including how to carry out different assessments and procedures is available through the ProQuest Hospital Collection.

Clinical guidelines, resources to support professional and career development, and other helpful information can be found on the Royal College of Nursing website, while information relating to registration and nursing standards is available from the Nursing and Midwifery Council.

Journals

NICE provide a searchable A-Z of all journals available through OpenAthens, which can be found here: https://journals.nice.org.uk/

Available journals include: Nursing Standard, Nursing Management, and the British Journal of Nursing.

Login and search to see all available titles.

Databases

In addition to Cinahl and Emcare the larger, and international databases which provide coverage relevant to all nursing specialties and professionals, there are also some smaller UK specific databases with a focus on nursing: the British Nursing Index, and Internurse.

The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, which you can find at the Cochrane Library also includes material relevant to nursing, as do more general medical databases such as Medline (and it’s free equivalent PubMed) and Embase.

Finding information

The library team at St George’s offers training on where and how to find the best quality information to support clinical practice, research, and quality improvement. You can find details on the sessions available here.

We also provide a evidence search service, CARES, which provides aims to provide recent, reliable and relevant evidence on your topic or question. Search requests can be submitted for patient care queries, service development, teaching or research projects, or for any other professional need.

Help

St George’s library has a team dedicated to providing support for all of the nurses (and other NHS staff) at St George’s trust. If you have any questions, need advice on anything related to finding, or managing information, or if there’s anything that we might be able to help with, you can get in touch at: liaison@sgul.ac.uk

Mental Health Awareness Week – what nature means to library staff

From 10th to 16th May 2021 is Mental Health Awareness Week and this year the Mental Health Foundation has chosen nature as the theme.

Check out the hashtag #connectwithnature on social media. We will be sharing posts around Mental Health Awareness Week all week on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

In this blogpost, your library team highlights in sentences and images what nature means to them and their mental wellbeing.

Over the last year, many of us have become more aware of our relationship with nature, be that our balcony, garden, local park, forest, the beach or mountains. More than an appreciation of the small things in life, the last year has shown that we are inextricably part of nature and that nature plays a central role in our emotional and physical wellbeing. It has also become clear that access to and time in nature is often still for the privileged few, despite the fact that we all benefit enormously. Nature is not a luxury but must be available to all of us. Perhaps our appreciation for the natural world over the last year in combination with our increasing and continued damage to our planet has given us food for thought. In this sense, access to nature for mental wellbeing is a social justice and environmental issue.

With this blogpost, we want to raise awareness of the importance of mental wellbeing and the role that nature can play in that. We want to normalise conversations around how we are doing and that at times, we might not be doing so well emotionally or mentally.

What does nature mean to us and our mental wellbeing?

Sue – Associate Director of Information Services (Library & Learning Services)

Escape from the rat race
Space to think
Inspiring awe
A step away from the mundane
Tiny miracles
Expanding our horizons

Rocks on the beach in Hastings
at the beach in Hastings

Karen – NHS and Liaison Manager

Accessing local green spaces has helped me and my children digitally detox during intensive times of home-learning and home-working this past year

Emily (Information Assistant)

During the first lock down, when you were only allowed an hour outside a day, I tried to ensure I took my kids out for some sort of walk every day to get a bit of exercise and fresh air.  Being outside helped us to stay feeling connected to the world and I think feel somehow reassured that the sun still came out, the rain still fell, the trees still stood, and the flowers grew. It was a sense of some normality in the chaos that nature still carried on. It made us appreciate every little bit of green space nearby.  We always returned from outside feeling more hopeful.

Anna – Liaison Librarian (FHSCE)

Conversations about nature tend to cheer people up, and are a vehicle for a non-stressful chat with colleagues.

Stephen – Liaison Support Librarian (NHS)

Regarding the question of nature, I suppose the first impulse is to think of the outdoors in some of its grander forms (beaches, mountains, forests, etc.) before then considering those havens of nature which may be nearby to us (parks, commons, woods) which, given that ‘more than one in five households in London has no access to a private or shared garden‘, offer invaluable resources in support of health and wellbeing. 

Even more locally than these, however, is the nature that can (should?) be brought into the home (and work) environment. For the good that plants can do in cleaning indoor air; for the connection that tending plants offers to a larger living world; and for the aesthetic contribution that plants can make to any indoor space, my shout out goes to the humble (or showy) houseplant.

Jennifer – Research Publications Librarian

White blossom; blue sky

Delicate petals fall and

Again, I will sigh.

Photo of tree blossoms
Blossom

Louise – Helpdesk supervisor

I like to be out in nature – in the outside, wandering in the woods – always nicer in the sunshine of course but I love lifting my face to the wind in early Autumn.

The main thing I think is how nature affects your senses;

Smell –  fresh rain – especially in the summer, flowers, freshly cut grass, even those ‘farmyard’ smells just make you think of nature in general.

Sight – new blossom on trees, the changing colours of leaves in the Autumn, freshly laid snow in Winter. Seeing newborns – ducklings/Goslings growing, tadpoles changing into frogs.

Touch – feeling grasses, petals even different textured tree trunks, pebbles, stones, sand beneath your bare feet.

Hearing – the most obvious is the bird call of course. Although noting beats the sea crashing on the shore if you are by the coast, or even the gentler shushing of waves.

Ros – User Experience & Operations Manager

Two children with their backs turned away from the camera, running along a forest path with bluebells on either side.

Dan – Information Assistant

It’s always good to get out of the house whether its just to the park over the road or a car trip to the beach. Its about being out in the fresh air and looking at the trees and green or being by the Sea. I always feel better after I’ve been outside even if its just for an hour or two. It certainly improves my day. The dog loves it too!

Juulia – Archivist

Here is a composite of photos I’ve taken across the year of the trees in a nearby woods. Having access to a green space has definitely been a lifeline, and doing more or less the same walk every day has made me focus on the seasonal changes, and on all the small details you might otherwise miss. And it has made me really appreciate how you can find beauty maybe in some unexpected places – my local cemetery is absolutely brimming with nature & life!

Composite of photos of trees across the seasons

James – Liaison Support Librarian (FHSCE)

When I’m outside in nature my mind becomes quiet and I have the opportunity to become aware of something bigger than myself. When I’m not so focused on me and my story, I can really begin to relax and start to let go of built-up tensions.

Georgie – Information Assistant

I’ve become a member of Kew Gardens in the last year and it’s been wonderful to be able to spend time in such a beautiful place. I had a lovely, quiet, peaceful walk there on Sunday morning.

Picture of bluebells and trees in the sunshine at Kew Gardens.
At Kew Gardens

Alex – Project Archivist

I think to me, nature reminds me that I am part of something bigger, something beautiful. It makes me feel extremely lucky and full of joy but as I have gotten older that joy tends to be tinged with a bit of sadness and frustration at how often we mistreat it and take it for granted. Over the last year I have loved seeing people, myself included, reconnect with nature and take pleasure in simply being outside, but I have also seen how much nature has become a privilege that not everyone has equal access to and that it is very easy to be cut off from in modern cities. Being surrounded by nature, I would say, is extremely good for my mental wellbeing, but it is not always an entirely positive experience and sometimes I do leave it feeling slightly weighed down by my responsibility to do more to protect what I have seen.

Anne – Liaison Support Librarian (IMBE)

A chance to connect with something beyond myself
Miracles of colours, textures, sounds
The abundance of life away from a screen
Sharing the joy of nature with others
A spiritual practice and gratitude
Watching seedlings grow

Careers Week 2021 Reflections and Survey

In March we held the second annual Careers Week at St George’s, University of London. We were delighted with the participation with over 500 views. Complete our survey for a chance to win £50 Amazon vouchers.

Careers Week 2021 – what did we do?

The theme this year was Resilience, Workplace Wellbeing and Planning your Career in a Pandemic. The programme included Q&A sessions in which alumni and students from a range of disciplines and courses shared their own careers and wellbeing insights, providing advice on how to manage your own future and job hunt successfully in these unpredictable times. There were top tips and words of encouragement for current students and those seeking work or direction as well as inspirational career stories, with common themes of perseverance, commitment, and consistent courage to find and take opportunity. The broad spectrum of careers and study routes open to SGUL graduates was showcased by alumni representing the wide range of SGUL programmes, some were most unexpected, demonstrating that studying a vocational course does not mean career choice and progression is a foregone conclusion.

The sessions were recorded and are available to watch on the St George’s YouTube channel.

Decorative image of two healthcare professionals walking and talking.

Win £50 Amazon vouchers – Careers Week Feedback Survey

We would really value your feedback! We are running a competition to win 3 x £50 Amazon vouchers to thank you for your participation. By giving your feedback you will help us improve and make sure we are providing the support you and future students value. You will get the opportunity to give your own ideas and suggestions for Careers Week 2022, comment on the online experience, as well as the Careers Week programme 2021. Complete the survey (5 minutes to complete). Deadline for completion is 21 May 2021.

If you missed the Alumni Q&A sessions then do visit here. See the full list below with key themes covered. It is worth watching a range (i.e. even those outside of your own programme) as the tips and inspiration are often interchangeable between disciplines. Don’t forgot to watch and complete our survey before 21 May 2021 for your chance to win Amazon vouchers.

Careers Week recordings on YouTube Channel

The Careers Week session recordings are on YouTube.

Programme contributors

Resilience and Adjusting to Channel Nicoletta Fossati, MBBS Alumna  

Adapting to change and looking after your wellbeing Cathy Wield, MBBS Alumna 

Work-life balance and managing stress Chris Redmond, Healthcare Science Alumnus

Looking after your wellbeing in a pandemic– Nirja Joshi, MBBS Alumna

Making a move into teaching, and taking a career break – Matthew Owen, Physiotherapy Alumnus

Non-traditional career pathways Francesca Humfrey, Biomedical Science Alumna

Changing career paths and moving into management– Jessica Brett, Healthcare Practice Alumna

Non-traditional routes into healthcare – Adrien Dansette, Paramedic Science Alumnus

Changing direction in your career, and working towards your goals – Shirley Forson, Physiotherapy Alumna

Postgraduate study and studying abroad – Rosie Dutt, Biomedical Science Alumna

Adapting to new ways of working and balancing work and family – Saira Alam, Therapeutic Radiography (contact careers@sgul.ac.uk should you wish to view this interview).

Making a difference through research – tips for those considering a PhD – Jacob Wildfire, PhD