Holiday Checklist

Wherever you plan to be over the holidays, your SGUL library membership can help you keep studying. Check our three quick tips below to help you make the most of our resources no matter where you are.

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1. Reset your SGUL password

Your SGUL login and password give you access to a huge range of online resources – including e-journals and e-books and tools such as Acland’s Anatomy, BMJ Best Practice and Cite Them Right – from anywhere with an internet connection. So you probably don’t want to find your password has expired when you’re 200 (or 2000) miles from campus.

To avoid this, we recommend resetting your password before you leave SGUL to ensure it won’t expire for another three months. Use the password change link, or drop in and see us at the Library Helpdesk between 8am and 6pm on weekdays.

Forgotten/expired password?

If your password does expire while you’re away – or you’ve forgotten it – you may be able to reset it using this link. For this to work, you must have previously registered a personal email address, and you can do that here (current login required).

2. If you’ve borrowed books, keep an eye on renewals

Any books that you’ve borrowed will renew automatically as long as no-one else requests them. So in most cases, the only reminder you’ll receive is an email telling you that your items have successfully renewed.

But if one of your books is requested by another user, you’ll receive an email and will need to try and return it by the due date if possible.

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Due dates – good news!

All books that renew on or after 17th December will have an earliest due date of 2nd January. Three-week loan books are already renewing until January.

If you’re unable to return a recalled book by the due date…

…we recommend signing in to your account in Hunter where you can attempt to renew it manually. If another copy of the book has been returned, your renewal will succeed – so try this over several days to increase your chances.

Find more detailed guidance in our blog post here.

 

3. Register to study in a library near you

SCONULlibraries

SGUL Library is a member of the SCONUL access scheme, allowing our users reference access to over 170 other university libraries across the UK and Ireland. (Postgraduates may also get limited borrowing rights in some cases.)

To start using the scheme, follow the steps on the SCONUL Access page. Within a few days*, and provided there are no fines on your Library account, you’ll receive an email from us which you can take to your chosen library along with your SGUL ID for access.

Free WiFi with Eduroam

Like SGUL, many universities in the UK and worldwide use Eduroam for WiFi. If you’re visiting another university – or just passing nearby – you’ll often pick up the network on a WiFi-enabled phone or laptop and will be able to connect using your SGUL username (remember to include @sgul.ac.uk) and password.

*We’ll be unable to reply to SCONUL requests from 21st December to 1st January inclusive. If you plan to visit another library during this period, we also recommend checking opening dates on their website.

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The Big Read has arrived at St George’s

The idea behind the Big Read is for everyone at St George’s to come together over a shared reading experience. This year The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce was chosen and every first-year student receives their own SGUL copy of the book.

The Big Read project centres around making students, returning or brand-new to St George’s, feel welcome. It will help those of you who are feeling slightly nervous about being in a whole new environment, possibly away from home for the very first time and meeting lots of new people. As everyone takes part in this big book club, you have a conversation starter ready-made.

This year marks the first time St George’s University has its very own Big Read Project and to celebrate the occasion, Library staff have got together to discuss Harold’s pilgrimage over a cup of tea and a biscuit (or two). We had a lively discussion about Joyce’s novel and as in any good book club, we found that we all had slightly (or very) different opinions on the protagonists and key themes.

Below you can read our (spoiler-free) thoughts on the novel.

Beth, Liaison Support Librarian (IMBE)

It’s easy to see why The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry was picked for this year’s Big Read title: it’s packed full of big topics that readers from all backgrounds will be able to relate to in some way. As the plot unfolds, it tackles (among many others) themes of grief and loss, loneliness, kindness, addiction and friendship. It’s an enjoyable easy read too, despite some difficult subject matter, as we accompany Harold on his pilgrimage across the UK. When I originally sat down to gather my thoughts for this post, I found myself wondering whether this had quite as profound an impact on me as previous Big Read selections. However, I was forced to re-examine that opinion after getting involved with our staff book group – this is certainly a story that deserves some unpacking and discussion. I’ve found myself revisiting and reappraising the way in which this book tackles these big issues and actually, it appears it’s definitely left its mark.

Anne, Liaison Support Librarian (Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education)

The themes in Harold Fry are universal to the human experience and include loss, regret, dysfunctional relationships and ageing. However, for me the power of the narrative lies in the portrayal of seemingly more minor topics, such as the importance of spending time outside in nature, mindfulness, and connecting with others regardless of how different they are from us. Along with Harold, the reader learns, or rather is reminded, that we are all unique and yet the same. We are often struggling with very similar problems, but ordinary human life is also full of wonders and human connection, which are always around us if we take a minute to appreciate them.

While the book unquestionably addresses really big topics, and can be emotionally challenging at times, it is a real page-turner.

Jenni, Research Publications Assistant

I thought that the portrayal of the beginning of Harold’s pilgrimage was very effective: he increases the length of his journey to post his letter by increments, unable to truly admit to himself that he doesn’t want to return to the home that represents his emotional stagnation, and once the idea of the pilgrimage occurs to him, giving him the excuse to keep going, he seizes on it. His inability to think about the practical reality of his pilgrimage, or to make any active plans other than to continue it, worked well as a mirror for his inability to entirely face his own emotions and past all in one go: like his pilgrimage, he has to tackle it piece by piece, at an angle, without admitting that’s what he’s doing until he’s already doing it

Dan, Information Assistant

I enjoyed Rachel Joyce’s book. There are many themes running through like isolation, grief and loneliness. However, my favourite chapter in the book is when Harold on his pilgrimage meets with Martina a qualified Doctor from another country and although she has problems of her own to address she nonetheless dresses his wounds from excessive walking and takes care of him for a few days when he clearly is exhausted.  It highlights one of the major themes in the book which is the unexpected kindness of strangers when you most need it.

Michelle, Research Data Manager, had a different take on the novel

The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry is an inspiring book about illness, suffering and loss, and how these expressions of human existence transcend the various skins that hold them. Unfortunately, for a book about the fragility of skin and the universality of the human condition, Harold is hard to relate to. Harold is of a particular time and place and even as he challenges his own lens he is caught within them, making this a conflicting read at times.

At the end of the Library’s own book club, we couldn’t agree whether the protagonists have more to celebrate than to mourn or whether Harold’s journey has a “happy end” or not, so get reading today and join the discussion on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter today.

Previous years’ books

Organised since 2015, Big Read has been growing every year. In 2018, Gail Honeyman’s Eleanor Oliphant is completely fine was picked, which proved very popular with Library staff. This and previous years’ short-listed titles are available on loan from the Library, as well as all the winning titles of course. You can read our thoughts on the books from previous years by clicking on The Big Read tag.

Current students and SGUL staff can pick up a copy of The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry from the help desk in the Library.

Author’s visit

Join us on 6th November for the Big Read Author talk at St George’s where Rachel Joyce will speak about her book and signs your copy! Find out more here. Booking is essential!

Summer Holiday Checklist

Summer 2019 Checklist 2

Planning to be away from SGUL over the next few months? We’ve put together three quick tips that we hope will help keep your studies going smoothly over the summer.

1. Reset your SGUL password

Resetting your password before you leave campus ensures it won’t expire for the next three months. Use the password change link, or drop in to the Library Helpdesk between 8am and 6pm on weekdays.

Forgotten/Expired password?

If your password does expire while you’re away, you may be able to reset it from offsite using this link.

Note: you must have already set up an external email address and if you don’t receive the reset link, check your junk mail folder.

Access e-resources with your SGUL login

Your SGUL login and password give you access to a wide range of online resources – including electronic journals, e-books and tools such as Acland’s Anatomy and BMJ Best Practice – from anywhere with an internet connection.

Check our helpsheet (PDF) for advice about accessing e-resources while you’re away from SGUL.

2. Keep an eye on book renewals

Any books that you’ve borrowed will renew automatically as long as no-one else requests them. So in most cases, the only reminder you’ll receive is an email telling you that your items have successfully renewed.

Books in a circular pattern

But if one of your books is requested by another user, you’ll receive an email asking you to return it by the due date.

If your book is requested while you’re away from SGUL…

…you will still need to return it by the due date if possible. Overdue books are fined at 20p per day and are invoiced after two weeks.

But if you’re unable to return a book by the due date, we recommend signing in to your account in Hunter where you can attempt to renew it manually. If another copy of the book has been returned, your renewal will succeed – so try this over several days to increase your chances.

Find more detailed guidance in our blog post here.

3. Register to study in a library near you

sconul-banner

SGUL Library is a member of the SCONUL access scheme, allowing our users reference access to over 170 other university libraries across the UK and Ireland. (Postgraduates may also get limited borrowing rights in some cases.)

To start using the scheme, follow the steps on the SCONUL Access page. Within a few days, and provided there are no fines on your Library account, you’ll receive an email from us which you can take to your chosen library along with your SGUL ID card to apply for access.

Free WiFi with Eduroam

Eduroam

Like SGUL, many universities in the UK and worldwide use Eduroam for WiFi. If you’re visiting another university – or just passing nearby – you’ll often pick up the network on a WiFi-enabled phone or laptop and will be able to connect using your SGUL username (remember to include @sgul.ac.uk) and password.

Placing Holds: a quick guide

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Books that are out on loan can be reserved in a few quick steps using the Library’s search tool, Hunter.

After finding the book you want, select Check availability of print copies to find out whether it’s available:

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If all copies are out on loan, you’ll be able to reserve a copy. Just follow the three steps below:

no 1 fadeIf you haven’t already, sign in to Hunter.

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  • SGUL staff and students can sign in with their SGUL username and password
  • NHS staff can find out their Hunter login by asking at the Library helpdesk or emailing library@sgul.ac.uk

no 2 fadeAfter you sign in, a Place hold option appears. Click here…

2 place hold cut

no 3 fade…and select Request

3 select request

Hunter confirms that your hold is placed:

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When a copy of the book becomes available you’ll receive an email, and will then have one week to collect it from the Library Helpdesk.

International Women’s Day 2019

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Happy International Women’s Day!

There’s plenty of superb female writing talent in the Library, from our own St George’s academics, to classic and contemporary fiction writers. As we were celebrating reading for pleasure during World Book Day yesterday, we thought we’d mark #IWD2019 by pulling together a selection of female-authored fiction titles available in the Library.

You can find these and the rest of our fiction on the shelves at PN3353, but if you’d like to browse them online, click the image below. Each item is linked to its Hunter record, so you can check to see whether a copy is available to borrow. If it’s on loan, remember you can place a hold by signing in to Hunter:

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International Women’s Day is all about celebrating women’s achievements, so there’s no better day to mark the accomplishments of our first four female medical students. Admitted in 1915 due to a shortage of men during the First World War, two of them are pictured below. Helen Ingleby (L) & Hetty Ethelberta Claremont (R) went on to have successful careers in the medical profession.

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You can read more about ‘The First Women of St George’s’ in this interactive timeline. Click the image below for more details, or read our profile of pioneering female medics during the First World War.

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World Book Day 2019

WBD logo EYES TOP RIGHT.jpgHappy World Book Day! While Library staff aren’t dressing up like classic book characters (we hope you aren’t too disappointed), some of us have been reading and reviewing new and classic picks from our fiction collection.

You can browse online collections of these titles at the links below, or by searching for fiction in Hunter:

KU Big Read titles
LGBT History Month titles
Black History Month titles

 

On to the reviews!

 

Tin Man by Sarah Winman

A short but beautifully bittersweet story of grief, and the loves that preceded it.

A book of two halves, the narrative follows firstly Ellis and then transfers to Michael, childhood friends whose lives have diverged in adulthood. However, while being centred on the story of these two men, the book opens in 1950 with a woman and what is described as ‘her first ever act of defiance.’ The woman, instead of complying with her husband’s instruction to choose a bottle of whiskey upon winning a raffle draw at a local community centre event, chooses a reproduction painting of van Gogh’s Sunflowers. The woman is Dora Judd, Ellis’s mother, and both she and the painting are a thread woven through the story of these men’s lives, signifying the possibilities of committing to an act of hope – the choice to turn towards the light.

Winman’s prose is understated yet brimming with beauty and compassion, embodying one of the underlying themes of the novel – the beauty and potential inherent in the everyday.

Verity Allison, Journals and e-Resources Librarian

 

Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie

“For girls, becoming women was inevitability; for boys, becoming men was ambition”

Home Fire is a modern-day reworking of the Greek tragedy Antigone, centred around a British Muslim community who are dealing with the fallout of one their own leaving London to join ISIS. The story unfolds through a number of different perspectives; from siblings Isma, Aneeka and Parvaiz, to the Home Secretary Karamat Lone and his son Eamonn.

It is certainly an intense read, but an important one. Shamsie’s insidious descriptions of Parvaiz’s slide into radicalisation are heartbreaking and her characterisation of the British tabloid press is spot-on and desperately frustrating to read. Part-thriller, part homage to the power of love and family, the story builds and builds to a hugely cinematic climax. How satisfying you find the ending is very much up for discussion, but this is a read that has stuck with me for a long, long time after turning the last page.

Beth Jackson, Liaison Support Librarian

 

The English Patient by Michael Ondaatje

I first saw Anthony Minghella’s Oscar-winning film adaption of this book, and having subsequently heard the director talk about Michael Ondaatje’s beautiful writing I was intrigued. The book itself won the Booker Prize in 1992, and the Golden Man Booker Prize in 2018 – essentially being voted the best of the all previous Booker prize winners.

Set at the time of the Second World War, several lives entwine around an “English” patient who has badly been burned in an airplane accident. The back-story that unfurls is both romantic and heartbreaking.

I find it very hard to keep interested in books where I have already seen the film but Ondatjee’s writing really is special: he writes very poetically.  The plot is slightly different to the film which always makes it more interesting. I’d definitely recommend this book.

Daniel Jeffcote, Information Assistant

 

If you’d like some more recommendations, we’ve previously featured reviews written by FHSCE and Library staff. How about one reading one of our selected #KUBigRead shortlisted titles? You can find their reviews below:

The Penguin Lessons
The Elephant and the Bee
The Power
Radio Sunrise
The Brilliant and Forever
My Name is Leon

On the other hand, if you prefer a non-fiction read but aren’t in the mood for another Oxford Handbook, Library staff have also reviewed a selection of popular science writing. You can read our thoughts here.

Happy reading!

 


If you’d be interested in reading and reviewing any books from the Library collection, please do get in touch with us by emailing liaison@sgul.ac.uk

September Update

Whether you’re back in Tooting or still a little further afield, the Library has a range of help and resources that you can connect to from (almost) anywhere, helping you get a headstart on your studies for the new semester.

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Access online resources with your SGUL login

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Use the new-look Hunter to search for e-books and online journal articles that you can access from anywhere with an internet connection.

  • To find e-books, drop down to ‘Books and more’ before you search, then use the filter options to narrow your results to Online Resources.

E-book search

  • Search in ‘Articles and more’ to find online journal articles and similar material.

To open the full e-book or article, follow the links under ‘View Online’ and enter your SGUL login and password. You can find more help in our PDF guide to accessing e-resources from offsite.

For more advice about finding resources in Hunter, see the Hunter FAQs.


More online resources, including Acland’s Video Atlas of Human Anatomy, BMJ Best Practice and DynaMed Plus, can be found in the Databases A-Z.

  • Find a resource in the A-Z list then follow the link for offsite access
  • Enter your SGUL login and password to access

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Find more information about online resources and apps in the Useful Apps section of our Library Essentials LibGuide.

Forgotten/Expired password?

Use this link to reset it from offsite.

Note: you must have already set up an external email address and if you don’t receive a reset email, check your junk mail folder.


Contact the Library for help

The Library remains open 7 days a week, with 24 hour opening returning from Monday 17th September.

The Library Helpdesk is staffed as usual from 8am to 6pm every weekday. Call in and see us, or phone us on 020 8725 5466.

Helpdesk iconRED icon

The Research Enquiries Desk can help with more in-depth queries about finding resources, referencing and more. Drop in or phone 020 8725 5514 during the RED’s staffed hours (see below).

Alternatively, email a query to liaison@sgul.ac.uk and a liaison librarian will get back to you.

Summer From Sep 17th
Library Opening Hours Mon to Fri: 8am – 11pm

Sat and Sun: 9am – 9pm

24 hours

Library Helpdesk staffed Mon to Fri: 8am – 6pm Mon to Fri: 8am – 6pm
Research Enquiries Desk staffed Mon to Fri: 12pm – 2pm* Mon to Fri: 11am – 2pm* from Sep 11th

*subject to change

Find more information about these and other services – including support with IT and academic writing – in the Getting help section of our Library Essentials LibGuide.