Changes to downloading e-books from Dawsonera *revised*

The process for downloading e-books from Dawsonera is changing. You may
have already noticed this change for some Dawsonera e-books and it will
apply to all Dawsonera e-books from 31st October 2017.

From a SGUL desktop computer or laptop

We advise you to use the read online option if you are
using a university computer or library laptop to access Dawsonera e-books.

From your own computer or mobile device

If you want to download a Dawsonera e-book onto your own desktop computer,
laptop, or mobile device, you will need to install free software as
described below.

  • To download Dawsonera e-books to your own desktop or laptop, you will
    need to install Adobe Digital Editions (ADE).
  • To download Dawsonera e-books to an iOS (Apple) or Android device, you
    will need to first download the BlueFire Reader app, which is available from the Apple and Google play stores.
  • How to download ADE or BlueFire Reader and access your Dawsonera e-book:
    1. Create an Adobe ID if you don’t already have one. Visit theAdobe website, click “ Sign in”, then “Get an Adobe ID”. Fill in the online form to sign up for an ID.
    2. Download ADE or BlueFire Reader, and authorise the software with your Adobe ID.
    3. Access the e-book on Dawsonera as normal, and choose to download to
      either Adobe Digital Editions or BlueFire Reader as appropriate.
  • Adobe have also provided this clip on how to create an Adobe ID
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App Review: BMJ Best Practice

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BMJ BP

Name: BMJ Best Practice

Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group

Devices: Smartphones and tablets with Android OS 4.2 or later and iPhones and iPads with iOS version 7.0 or later. We tested this app on an iPad.

Available from: iTunes App Store or Google Play.

Price: Free.

Available to SGUL students and staff only. Details on how to access the full content are included at the end of the post.

Type of information: Point of care, clinical decision making support tool.

For: UK healthcare professionals and healthcare students.

Main Pros: This new version of the app (released in 2017) requires substantially less storage on your device. Content is available offline after the initial download so it can be accessed at any time. Condition summaries contain links to relevant guidelines and papers. Daily content updates and the CME/CPD tracker can help keep you up-to-date in your chosen specialty.

Main Cons: A personal subscription is necessary for those without institutional access. Savings in storage capacity have been made by not including images in the downloaded data – they are now only available when using the app online. Initial search function was quite basic, but this has been addressed in a recent update.


BMJ Best Practice provides access to reliable information and guidance on hundreds of medical conditions that can be used to support you in clinical decision-making. This companion app to the web version of BMJ Best Practice is designed to be used on the move and after an initial download, content can be accessed when offline, which is particularly convenient if you are unable to connect to Wi-Fi.

This new version of the app will be familiar to anyone who has used it before, with the majority of changes being cosmetic and offering a cleaner, more responsive experience. New users should find the app intuitive and easy to navigate. The home screen offers a simple layout with a central search bar, and the icons at the bottom of the screen allow you to browse by speciality; browse the available calculators or quickly locate information you have recently or commonly referred to.

Condition summaries are broken down into sections and subsections, such as ‘Diagnosis’, ‘Treatment’ and ‘Management’ or you can use the ‘Highlights’ section for a quick summary and overview. This highlights section will also link to related conditions, or to clinical guidelines where appropriate. Each topic has a ‘Last Updated’ date underneath the heading so you can be sure the information is current and you can browse through all of the sections by swiping from right to left, or by using the back button to choose a different section. This is especially helpful in longer, more complex entries.

Where necessary, summaries will contain links to relevant guidelines, resources and articles which will then open in your device’s browser when connected to the internet. You can explore these as you read, or refer to the ‘Resources’ section for the full reference list. Links to the full-text of an article will also appear if the article or study features in a journal that the Library subscribes to.

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Download Instructions (for SGUL staff and students)

[PDF instructions available here]

  1. Create a ‘My Best Practice’ personal account on the BMJ Best Practice website (http://bestpractice.bmj.com/) whilst using either a computer in the Library Computer Rooms; a Library laptop; or using a device connected to the St. George’s eduroam WiFi network.bmjlogin
    Remember the email address and password used to create the account.
  2. Download the app from the iTunes app store (iOS) or Google Play (Android).
  3. Launch the app. When asked to log in, use the same email address and password you used to create your My Best Practice account.
    bmjaccess
  4. The app content will automatically begin to download. It will take about 5 minutes on a good WiFi connection.

Remember!!
Your subscription must be renewed every six months by logging into your My Best Practice personal account on the BMJ Best Practice website http://bestpractice.bmj.com/ using either a computer in the Library Computer Rooms; a Library laptop; or using a device connected to the St George’s eduroam WiFi network.

If you experience any difficulties in downloading the app, or need any assistance in using it, email us at liaison@sgul.ac.uk

All review of mobile resources are subject to the St George’s Library Disclaimer, please take the time to read it carefully.

Information Skills Training Sessions July – Sept 2017

Dates for our July – Sept 2017 Information Skill Training Sessions are below. Please see our information skills training page for full details and range of sessions available. Contact liaison@sgul.ac.uk to book a session

*New*  Finding the evidence

Finding top quality evidence is a priority for health care practitioners. This new session will introduce the high quality resources available to you as well as provide training in how to use them effectively to support evidence-based clinical practice or decision-making.
Recommended for: NHS staff

Thurs 20th July 15.00 – 17.00
Thurs 24th August 15.00 – 17.00
Tues 12th September 10.00 – 12.00

*New*  Twitter for Promotions

You will learn how to use Twitter for promotional purposes, find out about useful Twitter functions and tools such as Hootsuite and Storify.
Recommended for: Useful for anyone involved in a team or department Twitter account, or thinking of creating one.
Requirements: Users should be familiar with Twitter, as there will be a hands on element to the session.

Tues 15th August 12.00 -13.30

Introduction to critical appraisal
Thurs 27th July 15.00-16.30

Systematic Reviews – Finding and managing the evidence
Weds 19th July 13.00 -16.00
Weds 23rd August 10.00-13.00
Tues 19th September 13.00- 16.00

Getting Started with Twitter
Mon 31st July 12.00 – 13.30

Library Inductions for NHS Staff

Thurs 20th July 10.00 – 11.00
Thurs 17th August 10.00 – 11.00
Thurs 21st September 10.00 – 11.00

Personalised training

If you cannot make any of the times, we are happy to arrange sessions for either individual or larger groups depending on your needs. To organise a bespoke session please email us at liaison@sgul.ac.uk

Holiday Checklist

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Wherever you’re going to be over the summer, our online resources and other services can help you keep studying. Here are three quick steps to consider before you leave SGUL to make this as straightforward as possible.

  1. Reset your SGUL password
  2. Bring books to the library to renew
  3. Register to study in a library near you

1. Reset your SGUL password

With your SGUL login and password, you can use our journals and e-books, and online resources such as Acland’s Anatomy from anywhere with internet access.

We recommend you reset your password before you leave as this ensures you won’t need to change it again for 3 months.

If your password expires or you’ve forgotten your password, you can usually reset it from offsite. Note: you must have already set up an external email address and if you don’t receive the reset link, check your junk mail folder.

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For a refresher on finding online resources, have a look at our Hunter FAQs.
We also have step by step guide to accessing e-resources from offsite [PDF].

2. Bring books to the Library to renew

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Return and reissue your books to extend your renewal limit

If you’re borrowing items over the summer, it’s a good idea to bring them into the Library so you can return and reissue them on our self-service machines.

Once you’ve done this, you’ll be able to renew any unreserved items a further 10 times online by logging into your library account.  This requires entering the 10-digit number under the barcode on your SGUL card, so you may want to note this number down before you go away.

3. Register to study in a library near you

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SGUL Library is a member of the SCONUL scheme, which allows our users reference access to around 170 other university libraries across the UK and Ireland. Postgraduates may also get limited borrowing rights in some cases.

sconul map

To use the scheme,  follow the steps on the SCONUL Access page. Within a few days, and provided there are no fines on your Library account, you’ll receive an email from us which you can take to your chosen library along with your SGUL ID card to apply for access.

Like SGUL, many academic institutions in the UK and worldwide use Eduroam for WiFi. If  you are near a university and have WiFi enabled on phone or laptop, you should immediately pick up the network. If you are using Eduroam for the first  time, remember to enter your full SGUL username (including @sgul.ac.uk) and password.

Finally, if you’re staying a bit closer to St George’s over the summer, our Summer Sites blog series has information about medical and other libraries you can visit in London, as well as some nearby attractions. Note: double check with the libraries for their opening hours before visiting.

Our website library.sgul.ac.uk is a great jumping off point for accessing the services and resources mentioned in this post.

Library ♥ Pharmacy

library loves pharmacy bannerThis month our popular Library Loves series returns highlighting Pharmacy and Pharmacology resources available through St George’s Library.

Websites
Journals
Databases
Reference, Summaries & Point of Care resources
Regulatory Agencies
Societies & Professional Associations

Websites

The following websites form a comprehensive selection of online resources providing guidance, information and support on the use of medicines; along with news and analysis on topics relevant to pharmacy and pharmacology.

NICE Medicines and Prescribing
https://www.nice.org.uk/about/nice-communities/medicines-and-prescribing
A comprehensive suite of guidance, advice and support for the delivery of quality, safety and efficiency in the use of medicines.

Chemist + Druggist
http://www.chemistanddruggist.co.uk/
Featuring the latest UK community pharmacy news Chemist + Druggist is a weekly magazine containing news on clinical and business issues, alongside articles and training courses to assist pharmacists with their CPD.

electronic Medicines Compendium (eMC)
https://www.medicines.org.uk/emc/
the eMC contains up-to-date, easily accessible information about medicines licenced for use in the UK. With over 10,600 documents, all of which have been checked and approved by either the UK or European government agencies which licence medicines.

RxList
http://www.rxlist.com/script/main/hp.asp
RxList is an online medical resource dedicated to offering detailed and current pharmaceutical information on brand and generic drugs.

Specialist Pharmacy Service
https://www.sps.nhs.uk/
Specialist Pharmacy Services (SPS) aim to be “The first stop for professional medicines advice” SPS brings together expertise from Medicines Use and Safety, Procurement, Quality Assurance, Technical Services and UKMi. Delivered by senior pharmacy professionals and with a focus on hospital care, Specialist Pharmacy Services (SPS), underpin the safe, effective and efficient use of medicines across the country.

Cochrane Library
http://www.cochranelibrary.com/
The Cochrane Library is freely available and consists of several databases supporting evidence-based medicine.

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Journals

These journals comprise a list of ‘key titles’ for pharmacists and pharmacologists which the Library recommends for those wanting to keep up to date in this field.

All titles are available through the library. Staff and students of St Georges, University of London can access the Journals via the St George’s Library Journals A-Z list: accessing titles offsite will require you to enter in your SGUL username and password.

NHS staff can access these titles via the NICE Journals A-Z search using their OpenAthens account details.

Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin
The DTB provides rigorous and independent evaluations of, and practical advice on, individual treatments and the overall management of disease for doctors, pharmacists and other healthcare professionals. Published monthly by the BMJ the journal aims to provide informed and unbiased information on medical conditions, medicines and other treatments to enable readers to make informed choices and ensure patients get the best care.

British Journal of Pharmacology
The BJP gives leading international coverage of all aspects of experimental pharmacology.

Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics is an international journal concerned with the effects of drugs on the human gastrointestinal and hepato-biliary systems, particularly with relevance to clinical practice.

British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Published on behalf of the British Pharmacological Society, the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology contains papers and reports, research and review articles on all aspects of drug action in humans.

Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (AAC) features interdisciplinary studies that build an understanding of the underlying mechanisms and therapeutic applications of antimicrobial and antiparasitic agents and chemotherapy.

Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry
Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry is an international and multidisciplinary journal which aims to ensure the rapid publication of authoritative reviews and research papers dealing with experimental and clinical aspects of neuro-psychopharmacology and biological psychiatry.

European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
The European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology publishes original papers, short communications, and letters to the editors on all aspects of clinical pharmacology and drug therapy in humans. Coverage includes therapeutic trials; pharmacokinetics; drug metabolism; adverse drug reactions; drug interactions; all aspects of drug development; prescribing policies; pharmacoepidemiology; and matters relating to the safe use of drugs.

Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics (CPT) is a cross-disciplinary journal in experimental and clinical medicine devoted to publishing advances in the nature, action, efficacy, and evaluation of therapeutics.

Pharmacology & Therapeutics
Pharmacology & Therapeutics presents clear, critical and authoritative reviews of currently important topics in pharmacology.

Trends in Pharmacological Sciences
Trends in Pharmacological Sciences is a monthly review journal focusing on pharmacology and toxicology.

Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
The Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy is a journal of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (BSAC) and is among the foremost international journals in antimicrobial research.

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Databases

These databases contain relevant articles and papers for those interested in pharmacological research. The Library provides access to the EMBASE and MEDLINE databases for SGUL staff and students and NHS staff.

SGUL staff and students should follow the relevant links from the database entry on the A-Z database list, offsite access will require an SGUL username and password.

NHS staff will need an NHS OpenAthens account to access these databases using the updated Healthcare Databases Advanced Search (HDAS) platform.

ChemIDplus is freely available and does not require a login.

EMBASE
The EMBASE database covers biomedicine and pharmacology; particularly strong in the areas of drugs, toxicology and psychiatry; indexing over 3,500 international journals.

MEDLINE
Medline is a general medical database produced by the U.S. National Library of Medicine. The database contains millions of citations, derived from thousands of biomedical and life science journals.

ChemIDplus
ChemIDplus contains over 400,000 chemical records. More than 300,000 of those records include chemical structures. ChemIDplus allows you to search by name/synonym, physical properties or toxicity in order to identify chemical substances.

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References, Summaries and Point of Care resources

British National Formulary (BNF)
The BNF provide prescribers, pharmacists, and other healthcare professionals with sound up-to-date information about the use of medicines. Covering medicines generally prescribed in the UK, the BNF includes key information on the selection, prescribing, dispensing, and administration of medicines. Updated twice a year the BNF is available in print or online on MedicinesComplete or NHS Evidence.

British National Formulary for Children (BNFc)
Like the BNF the BNF for Children aims to provide prescribers, pharmacists, and other healthcare professionals with sound up-to-date information on the use of medicines for treating children.

Both the BNF and the BNFc are available as iOS and Android Apps; you will need an NHS OpenAthens account to access the content. More information can be found at the NICE apps for smartphones and tablets page.

Medicines Information Services
Information on any aspect of drug therapy can be obtained from Regional and District Medicines Information Services.
St George’s pharmacy department
Lanesborough Wing, 020 8725 1765

DynaMed Plus
An evidence-based knowledge system that helps healthcare staff make the right decisions at the point of care. It covers over 3,400 clinical topics, providing evidence-graded treatment recommendations as well as diagnostic and other information. Access via NHS Open Athens, the trust intranet, or download the mobile app, for information on the go.

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Regulatory Agencies

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA)
The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency regulates medicines, medical devices and blood components for transfusion in the UK. MHRA is an executive agency, sponsored by the Department of Health. Recognised globally as an authority in its field, the agency plays a leading role in protecting and improving public health.

European Medicines Agency
The European Medicines Agency (EMA) is responsible for the scientific evaluation, supervision and safety monitoring of medicines developed by pharmaceutical companies for use in the EU. The EMA supports scientific excellence in the evaluation and supervision of medicines ensuring that all medicines available on the EU market are safe, effective and of high quality.

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Societies & Professional Associations

Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI)
(ABPI) represents innovative research-based biopharmaceutical companies; companies who supply more than 80 per cent of all branded medicines used by the NHS and who are researching and developing the majority of the current medicines pipeline.

Royal Pharmaceutical Society
The RPS is the professional membership body for pharmacists and pharmacy in Great Britain and an internationally renowned publisher of medicines information.

The British Pharmaceutical Society
The British Pharmacological Society is a charity with a mission to promote and advance the whole spectrum of pharmacology. The Society leads the way in the research and application of pharmacology around the world.

International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP)
The International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) is the global body representing pharmacy and pharmaceutical sciences. Through 139 national organisations, academic institutional members and individual members, FIP represent over three million pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists around the world.

General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC)
The GPhC is the body responsible for the independent regulation of the pharmacy profession within England, Scotland and Wales. Responsible for the regulation of pharmacists, pharmacy technicians and pharmacy premises.

British Pharmaceutical Students’ Association (BPSA)
The British Pharmaceutical Students’ Association is the official student organisation of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society; founded in 1942 it is the only national body that solely represents pharmacy students and pre-registration trainee pharmacists.

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Further Information

For help in viewing or downloading online journals, or accessing databases pop along to the Research Enquiries Desk in the Quiet Study Area of the Library, Mon-Fri 11am-4pm.

If you are an NHS user and are having problems with your OpenAthens account, please contact your OpenAthens administrator Zena Ali at zali@sgul.ac.uk or 020 8725 5433.

Information on accessing and using some of these resources can be found on the Library website help page.

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Information Skills Training Sessions April – June 2017

Feel like you are out of practice with literature searching? Looking for new ways to keep up-to-date? Or perhaps you want to create a professional social media presence? Why not sign up for one of our free training sessions held in the library. We have a wide range of sessions, which are free for anyone to attend regardless of if you are a St George’s or joint Faculty student, researcher, staff or an NHS trust member.

Dates are below, see our information skills training page for full details. Please contact liaison@sgul.ac.uk to book.

*New* Using Twitter for Promotions

You will learn how to use Twitter for promotional purposes, find out about useful Twitter functions and tools such as Hootsuite and Storify.
Recommended for: Useful for anyone involved in a team or department Twitter account, or thinking of creating one.
Requirements: Users should be familiar with Twitter, as there will be a hands on element to the session.

Thursday 25th May 12.00 – 13.30

Finding the evidence: databases and search skills

Searching databases using Ebscohost
Friday 21st April 12.00 – 13.00
Tuesday 23rd May 12.00 – 13.00
Thursday 8th June 13.00 – 14.00

Searching databases using Ovid
Monday 24th April 11.00 – 12.30
Tuesday 16th May 15.00 – 16.30
Tuesday 20th June 10.00 – 11.30

Evidence based healthcare resources
Monday 24th April 14.00 – 15.30
Tuesday 23rd May 10.00 – 11.30
Monday 19th June 14.00 – 15.30

Searching NHS databases
Tuesday 4th April 10.00 – 11.30
Tuesday 2nd May 10.00 – 11.30  Now cancelled
Thursday 25th May 10.00 – 11.30
Tuesday 6th June 13.00 – 14.30
Thursday 22nd June 10.00 – 11.30

Managing information and critical appraisal

Introduction to critical appraisal
Tuesday 9th May 11.00 – 12.30
Wedsday 7th June 15.00 – 16:30

Keeping up-to-date
Tuesday 25th April 11.00 – 12.30
Wednesday 7th June 12.00 – 13.30

Citation metrics – an overview
Thursday 11th May  12.00 – 13.00

Systematic Reviews – Finding and managing the evidence
Thursday 27th April 10.00 – 13.00
Wedsday 17th May 13.00 – 16.00
Tuesday 20th June 13.00 – 16.00

RefWorks
Tuesday 16th May 12.00 – 13.00
Friday 16th June 12.00 – 13.00

Getting Started with Twitter
Fri 12th May 12.00 – 13.30

Library Inductions for NHS Staff

Thursday 20th April 10.00 – 11.00
Thursday 18th May 10.00 – 11.00
Thursday 15th June 10.00 – 11.00

Personalised training

If you cannot make any of the times, we are happy to arrange sessions for either individual or larger groups depending on your needs. To organise a bespoke session please email us at liaison@sgul.ac.uk

Review: Acland’s Anatomy – Quiz function

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Learning Advocate Kurian George (Second Year Biomedical Science student) has written a review of the Acland’s Anatomy exams function.


What it is:

Acland’s Anatomy is a series of anatomy tutorials presented online using cadavers. Split up into five main sections of the upper and lower extremities, the trunk, the head and neck, and the internal organs, Acland’s anatomy explains each section to a great degree of detail step-by-step, making it clear in understanding the crucial concepts  for all years. It has always been recommended to put learning into practice, which can be done here as well, with exams available at the end of every section.

screenshot of  videos available in aclands.png

How to access it:

Aclands onsite link

Aclands offsite link  Select ‘UK access management‘ for Federation and St George’s, University of London as the institution.

If you can’t remember the link. Simply search for ‘SGUL Acland’s Anatomy‘  and select the link that says “A-Z Databases: acland’s“. Selecting this will take you to the onsite and offsite links.

A-Z aclands google screenshot
Search for SGUL Acland’s anatomy

Review of the Exam section:

I definitely found this very useful, as it puts to test whatever I have learnt and it is just for our own personal reflection of our knowledge of whatever we have learnt in the previous section. The fact that below each answer there is a link to the relevant section of the tutorial makes it a lot easier and convenient to learn from any mistakes made and further develop knowledge in that particular area. This is a great chance to learn if you don’t have time to go to the Dissecting Room outside the scheduled sessions.

Aclands Quiz functionality.png
When the answer is revealed, Acland’s displays a link to the relevant section of the tutorial.

You can access the exams (the quiz section) and save your favourites by registering for a personal account.

Conclusion:

Overall, I personally find Acland’s Anatomy a great resource to utilize outside of DR [Dissection Room] sessions and it does go into great detail in all of the areas of Anatomy. Having said that, it is difficult to discern how much one needs to learn as this is open to all years. In order to tackle, definitely use the DR book given in order to make sure you are on track with what is being taught and do not go into a lot more detail than what is required. Even though this is an excellent resource, it can take time to follow everything due to the amount of information given. One way to overcome this could be to learn the overview from the video and attached diagrams and animations, but also take part in some constructive learning with fellow peers, which I find is a great way to learn a lot of the taught content. To conclude, Acland’s Anatomy is an excellent resource and would definitely recommend it.

Kurian George
Second Year Biomedical Science Student


Find out more about what Learning Avocates do on our VLE (SGUL username and password required to log-in)