Festive reading from St George’s Library

Library staff have been busy searching Hunter this week to find some scientific (and not-so-scientific) festive reading for you, all in the name of spreading some good cheer. Have a look at our highlights below – we’ve linked to the Hunter record or full-text where possible.


Have you ever wondered why Rudolph’s nose is red? This intriguing observational study from 2012 sheds some light on the matter:

Rudolph - BMJ

Intrigued by the occupational health hazards that Father Christmas might experience in his very unique role? This commentary explores some of the issues and recommends a comprehensive workplace occupational health program for the man himself:

Santa - Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology

That isn’t the only paper that is concerned with Father Christmas’ calorie consumption. The authors below present some quite worrying calculations:

Santa Calories.png

Other researchers have concentrated their efforts on debunking the ‘naughty or nice’ myth, concluding that there are a number of socioeconomic reasons why Santa is, unfortunately, less likely to visit children in hospital. This is thankfully counterbalanced by the wonderful work NHS staff do to make the festive period special for their patients:

Father Christmas - BMJ.png

This next paper demonstrates that decorating your Christmas tree might not be such a festive activity if you have a colophonium allergy:

Christmas Tree - Contact Dermatitis.png

Finally, if you aren’t a Brussels sprouts fan, but feel duty-bound to eat some over the holidays, you might be pleased to hear that a nice glass of tannin-rich Cabernet Sauvignon might help improve the taste:

Brussels Sprouts - Journal of Texture Studies

 

Happy reading!

 

References:

Carpenter, G. et al. (2018) ‘Wine astringency reduces flavour intensity of Brussels sprouts’. To be published in Journal of Texture Studies [Preprint]. Available at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jtxs.12378 (Accessed: 18 December 2018).

Gether, L., Gyldenløve, M. and Thyssen, J.P. (2017) ‘Christmas tree dermatitis caused by colophonium allergy’, Contact Dermatitis, 77(6), pp. 412-414. Available at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/cod.12798 (Accessed: 18 December 2018).

Ince, C. et al. (2012) ‘Why Rudolph’s nose is red: observational study’, BMJ, 345:e8311, pp. 1-6. Available at: https://www.bmj.com/content/bmj/345/bmj.e8311.full.pdf (Accessed: 18 December 2018).

Park, J.J. et al. (2016) ‘Dispelling the nice or naughty myth: retrospective observational study of Santa Claus’, BMJ, 355:i6355, pp. 1-5. Available at: https://www.bmj.com/content/bmj/355/bmj.i6355.full.pdf (Accessed: 18 December 2018).

Straube, S. and Fan, X. (2015) ‘The occupational health of Santa Claus’, Journal of Occupational Health and Toxicology, 10(44), pp. 1-3. Available: https://occup-med.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12995-015-0086-1 (Accessed: 18 December 2018).

Wormser, G.P. and Ladenheim, A. (2018) ‘How many calories did Santa Claus consume on Christmas Eve?’, Wiener klinische Wochenschrift, 130(1-2), pp. 73-75. Available at: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00508-017-1306-8 (Accessed: 18 December 2018).

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Times Higher Education: full online access for SGUL staff and students

THE-LogoFollowing an upgrade to our subscription, SGUL staff and students now have unlimited online access to content from Times Higher Education.

THE is a weekly online and print publication carrying news, features and opinion on higher education in the UK and around the world.

 

To activate your access, you will need to register on the THE homepage using your SGUL email address. Please note that by doing this, you agree to the Times Higher Education cookie policy and terms and conditions.

Setting up your access

1) Visit THE’s homepage at https://www.timeshighereducation.com.

THE website can also be accessed via Hunter, the library’s search tool, via this link.

2) Select the person icon at top right and choose Register.

THE register

 

 

 

 

3) Remember to register with your @sgul.ac.uk email address for full access. You’ll also be asked to choose a password and username.

Accessing content

You should now have full access to all the latest content on the homepage, or you can browse past issues by opening the Professional menu and selecting Digital Editions.

THE digital editions new

For reading on mobile devices, a free app is available from Google Play or the iTunes App Store. Log in to the app using the username and password you chose when you created your account. You’ll now be able to download current and past issues to your device, read and share articles and save favourites to an in-app scrapbook.

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Holiday Checklist

Spring holiday - banner

Going to be away from SGUL over the next few weeks? We’ve put together three quick tips that we hope will help with any studying you plan to do, no matter where you are.

  1. Reset your SGUL password
  2. Bring books to the library to renew
  3. Register to study in a library near you

1. Reset your SGUL password

With your SGUL login and password, you can use our journals and e-books, and online resources such as Acland’s Anatomy from anywhere with internet access.

We recommend you reset your password before you leave as this ensures you won’t need to change it again for 3 months.

If your password expires or you’ve forgotten it, you can usually reset it from offsite. Note: you must have already set up an external email address and if you don’t receive the reset link, check your junk mail folder.

sign in to hunter for more features

If you’re using Hunter to find resources, signing in first with your SGUL password will make it quicker and easier to access journals and e-books from offsite. Read more about the advantages of signing in to Hunter in our blog post.

2. Bring books to the Library to renew

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Return and reissue your books to extend your renewal limit

Books and other items you have borrowed from us will now be automatically renewed 10 times, unless another library user has requested them.

To make sure you don’t reach your 10 renewal limit while you’re away from SGUL, we recommend bringing items into the Library so you can return and reissue them on our self-service machines before you leave.

3. Register to study in a library near you

sconul banner

SGUL Library is a member of the SCONUL scheme, which allows our users reference access to around 170 other university libraries across the UK and Ireland. Postgraduates may also get limited borrowing rights in some cases.

sconul map

To use the scheme,  follow the steps on the SCONUL Access page. Within a few days, and provided there are no fines on your Library account, you’ll receive an email from us which you can take to your chosen library along with your SGUL ID card to apply for access.

Like SGUL, many academic institutions in the UK and worldwide use Eduroam for WiFi. If  you are near a university and have WiFi enabled on phone or laptop, you should immediately pick up the network. If you are using Eduroam for the first  time, remember to enter your full SGUL username (including @sgul.ac.uk) and password.

Our website library.sgul.ac.uk is a great jumping off point for accessing the services and resources mentioned in this post.

Taylor & Francis Medical Library – free journals trial

We now have a 2 month trial of over 200 peer-reviewed academic journals from Taylor and Francis, ending 31st March.

For more information on titles available, access routes and how you can feedback your views on the collection, see our Resource trial page: http://library.sgul.ac.uk/resources/resource-trials

Holiday Checklist

Winter Holiday - banner

Wherever you’re going to be over the next few weeks, our online resources and other services can help you keep studying. Here are three quick steps to consider before you leave SGUL to make this as straightforward as possible.

  1. Reset your SGUL password
  2. Bring books to the library to renew
  3. Register to study in a library near you

1. Reset your SGUL password

With your SGUL login and password, you can use our journals and e-books, and online resources such as Acland’s Anatomy from anywhere with internet access.

We recommend you reset your password before you leave as this ensures you won’t need to change it again for 3 months.

If your password expires or you’ve forgotten it, you can usually reset it from offsite. Note: you must have already set up an external email address and if you don’t receive the reset link, check your junk mail folder.

Hunter-plus-text-750x100

For a refresher on finding online resources, have a look at our Hunter FAQs.
We also have a step by step guide to accessing e-resources from offsite [PDF].

2. Bring books to the Library to renew

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Return and reissue your books to extend your renewal limit

Books and other items you have borrowed from us will now be automatically renewed 10 times, unless another library user has requested them.

To make sure you don’t reach your 10 renewal limit while you’re away from SGUL, we recommend bringing items into the Library so you can return and reissue them on our self-service machines before you leave.

3. Register to study in a library near you

sconul banner

SGUL Library is a member of the SCONUL scheme, which allows our users reference access to around 170 other university libraries across the UK and Ireland. Postgraduates may also get limited borrowing rights in some cases.

sconul map

To use the scheme,  follow the steps on the SCONUL Access page. Within a few days, and provided there are no fines on your Library account, you’ll receive an email from us which you can take to your chosen library along with your SGUL ID card to apply for access.

Like SGUL, many academic institutions in the UK and worldwide use Eduroam for WiFi. If  you are near a university and have WiFi enabled on phone or laptop, you should immediately pick up the network. If you are using Eduroam for the first  time, remember to enter your full SGUL username (including @sgul.ac.uk) and password.

Our website library.sgul.ac.uk is a great jumping off point for accessing the services and resources mentioned in this post.

Holiday Checklist

banner

Wherever you’re going to be over the summer, our online resources and other services can help you keep studying. Here are three quick steps to consider before you leave SGUL to make this as straightforward as possible.

  1. Reset your SGUL password
  2. Bring books to the library to renew
  3. Register to study in a library near you

1. Reset your SGUL password

With your SGUL login and password, you can use our journals and e-books, and online resources such as Acland’s Anatomy from anywhere with internet access.

We recommend you reset your password before you leave as this ensures you won’t need to change it again for 3 months.

If your password expires or you’ve forgotten your password, you can usually reset it from offsite. Note: you must have already set up an external email address and if you don’t receive the reset link, check your junk mail folder.

Hunter-plus-text-750x100

For a refresher on finding online resources, have a look at our Hunter FAQs.
We also have step by step guide to accessing e-resources from offsite [PDF].

2. Bring books to the Library to renew

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Return and reissue your books to extend your renewal limit

If you’re borrowing items over the summer, it’s a good idea to bring them into the Library so you can return and reissue them on our self-service machines.

Once you’ve done this, you’ll be able to renew any unreserved items a further 10 times online by logging into your library account.  This requires entering the 10-digit number under the barcode on your SGUL card, so you may want to note this number down before you go away.

3. Register to study in a library near you

sconul website screenshot

SGUL Library is a member of the SCONUL scheme, which allows our users reference access to around 170 other university libraries across the UK and Ireland. Postgraduates may also get limited borrowing rights in some cases.

sconul map

To use the scheme,  follow the steps on the SCONUL Access page. Within a few days, and provided there are no fines on your Library account, you’ll receive an email from us which you can take to your chosen library along with your SGUL ID card to apply for access.

Like SGUL, many academic institutions in the UK and worldwide use Eduroam for WiFi. If  you are near a university and have WiFi enabled on phone or laptop, you should immediately pick up the network. If you are using Eduroam for the first  time, remember to enter your full SGUL username (including @sgul.ac.uk) and password.

Finally, if you’re staying a bit closer to St George’s over the summer, our Summer Sites blog series has information about medical and other libraries you can visit in London, as well as some nearby attractions. Note: double check with the libraries for their opening hours before visiting.

Our website library.sgul.ac.uk is a great jumping off point for accessing the services and resources mentioned in this post.

Evidence based healthcare resources

BMJ Case Reports

BMJ Case Reports is an international, peer reviewed collection of over 13,500 clinical cases covering all disciplines for clinicians and researchers.

Search by keyword or browse by specialty to find clinically important information on common and rare conditions, or subscribe to the RSS feed to receive updates on latest articles, most read articles or new blog posts.

Access is available to NHS staff via their NHS OpenAthens account (self-register here), and to SGUL staff and students via their university login details.

If you have an interesting case, you can receive peer reviews and rapid publication by submitting it for inclusion to BMJ Case Reports Journal. See the BMJ website for submission templates and full details on how to submit your case.

For more information about the SGUL subscription, or to obtain the institutional fellowship code, contact journals@sgul.ac.uk.

Drugs and Therapeutics Bulletin

Independent of the pharmaceutical industry, Government and regulatory authorities, each article in the DTB has been evaluated by a wide range of specialist and generalist commentators.

By providing rigorous, unbiased assessments and recommendations of drugs and other treatments for diseases, this journal can be relied upon by doctors, pharmacists and other healthcare professionals who are looking to make evidence based decisions to ensure their patients receive the best possible care.

Access is granted via Shibboleth for SGUL staff and students, and via OpenAthens for NHS staff.