Open Access Open Research

SGUL’s open access institutional repository SORA now has over two thousand full text publications written by SGUL researchers freely available online, a great milestone for SGUL to celebrate in International Open Access Week 2017.

On average there are over 1800 downloads of papers per month from SORA, the papers are indexed in SGUL’s Hunter, and in Google for maximum discoverability:

Screenshot of St George's Online Research Archive website

Win a £30 Amazon voucher: follow the library’s Twitter account @sgullibrary to enter our competition on this year’s OA week theme “Open in order to…” – tell us why you think ‘Open’ is good. (See our blog post and Terms and Conditions for how to enter).

Open access publication is a requirement of many of the big funders in biomedical and life sciences research due to its role in making research more accessible, more discoverable and more impactful1.

On the 4th October the Wellcome Trust released a new science strategy, Improving health through the best research. In it, they reaffirm their commitment to open research:

“Scientific knowledge achieves its greatest value when it is readily available to be used by others. And if knowledge generated with Wellcome support can be used for the improvement of health, it should be.”

Open research is an umbrella term bringing together a variety of efforts to make scientific research transparent and reproducible, and to increase its impact on policy, practice and technological advances. Open access publication is an important part of open research, helping to make research outputs accessible and useable by anyone. Another key tenet of open research is open data, and St George’s has recently launched a data repository to enable researchers to share, store and preserve their research content.

Queen’s University, Belfast, has put together some examples of how open access has benefitted their researchers.


For further information, please visit our open access webpage or contact openaccess@sgul.ac.uk.

 

1 The Open Access Citation Advantage Service, SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) Accessed 19 October 2017

 

Advertisements

Open in order to…

The theme of this year’s International Open Access Week, which runs from 23rd-29th October, is “Open in order to…”. This year the focus is on thinking about possibilities are opened up by making research outputs open access.

Win a £30 Amazon voucher: follow the library’s Twitter account @sgullibrary to enter our competition on this year’s OA week theme “Open in order to…” – tell us why you think ‘Open’ is good. (For terms and conditions, and how to enter, see the end of this post.)

Open in Order to Open Access banner for 2017

Here are some reasons why research is made “open in order to…”

…improve public health

Breakthroughs in medical science are frequently in the news, but the research publications underpinning the headlines are often locked away behind a publisher’s paywall. For example, the research article referred to in this recent article from the BBC  is currently only available to subscribers to the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and many publications cited in the recent award of the Nobel Prizes for Chemistry and Physics are not publicly accessible. By contrast, a recent study by SGUL researchers on meningitis in children was published in an open access journal, meaning that the full article can be read by anyone, anywhere in the world, at any time.

Open access research allows anyone who is interested to read and evaluate the research for themselves. This might include:

  • Medical professionals wanting to improve patient care;
  • Members of the public wanting to learn more about a condition they have;
  • Journalists wanting to report more accurately on the story;
  • Policy makers;
  • Researchers whose institutions don’t subscribe to the journal the research is published in, or who are operating outside an institution.

Opening up research helps improve public health by increasing access to academic research.

 

…raise the visibility of my research

Studies1 have consistently shown a citation advantage for open access publications over closed access ones. Depositing your work in a repository increases the avenues by which your research can be discovered, as well as helping readers to follow your research from paper to paper more easily by collecting them all together.

 

…enable global participation in research

Making research open enables all researchers to access it and removes the financial barrier for those working in less well funded institutions, as well as independent researchers working outside institutions. Making your data and publications accessible for free and licensing it under terms which allow for reuse means that other researchers can pick up on and build on your research, benefitting the global research community as a whole.

 

…find new collaborators

Making your work open helps researchers on related topics find it and identify possibilities for collaboration. Open access can also promote cross-disciplinary working by making it easier for researchers to access work outside their own discipline.

1 The Open Access Citation Advantage Service, SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) Accessed 19 October 2017

 

How to enter:

Follow @sgullibrary on Twitter and complete the phrase “Open in order to…” using the hashtag #openinorderto and @sgullibrary’s Twitter handle.

Terms and Conditions:

  1. The competition will run from Monday 23 October 2017 until Sunday 29 October 2017.
  2. The prize draw is open to anyone with a valid SGUL ID.
  3. Winners will be chosen from all valid entries once the competition has closed on Sunday 29 October 2017.
  4. Winners will be contacted via Twitter. Be sure to check your account.
  5. The prize can only be collected in person from St George’s Library on production of a valid ID card.
  6. Prizes must be collected within two weeks of notification.
  7. The Judges’ decision is final and no correspondence will be entered in to.
  8. Photos of the prize winners will be taken to be used in publicity on Library media channels.
  9. One prize winner will be selected, unless the prize is not collected by the deadline, in which case the uncollected prize will be reselected (once only).
  10. Your tweets may be reused by St George’s Library for future promotional or informational purposes.
  11. Entries must contain the hashtag #openinorderto and must tag the library’s Twitter account @sgullibrary.

 


To find out more about open access, contact openaccess@sgul.ac.uk or visit the Library open access webpages.

St George’s announces new research data repository

The Research Data Management Service has launched a research data repository for use by St George’s researchers, including our doctoral student researchers.

Figshare homepage screengrab for blog

Powered by figshare, the repository is the first phase of a pilot project to develop a shared research data management infrastructure for UK higher education. The pilot is headed by Jisc, and St George’s is proud to be one of just 13 higher education organisations included in the project. More information about this can be found on the project website.

The SGUL data repository is a digital archive for sharing, storing and preserving research content produced at St George’s. It was acquired to enable our researchers to better engage in Open Science and to respond to funder and publisher requirements for data sharing and preservation.

Researchers can use the repository to share research data, source code, posters, PowerPoint presentations, images, videos, electronic lab notebooks and a range of other digital research outputs. The repository can also be used to catalogue and link to items that are already in the public domain, but are difficult to discover, cite and measure for impact. Each deposit in the repository is provided with a persistent identifier, which allows items to be uniquely identified, cited and measured for impact.

All items deposited with us will be preserved for the lifetime of the repository.

Depositing to the repository is easy. All research staff and doctoral students are automatically registered for the service. Just log in to the repository using your institutional credentials and deposit your items following figshare’s normal deposit procedures. All deposits will be checked by a member of the research data management team before your research is published, giving you added peace of mind.

It is advisable to contact the Research Data Management Service if you intend to deposit your data in the repository to avoid any delay in publishing your research.

Evidence based healthcare resources

BMJ Case Reports

BMJ Case Reports is an international, peer reviewed collection of over 13,500 clinical cases covering all disciplines for clinicians and researchers.

Search by keyword or browse by specialty to find clinically important information on common and rare conditions, or subscribe to the RSS feed to receive updates on latest articles, most read articles or new blog posts.

Access is available to NHS staff via their NHS OpenAthens account (self-register here), and to SGUL staff and students via their university login details.

If you have an interesting case, you can receive peer reviews and rapid publication by submitting it for inclusion to BMJ Case Reports Journal. See the BMJ website for submission templates and full details on how to submit your case.

For more information about the SGUL subscription, or to obtain the institutional fellowship code, contact journals@sgul.ac.uk.

Drugs and Therapeutics Bulletin

Independent of the pharmaceutical industry, Government and regulatory authorities, each article in the DTB has been evaluated by a wide range of specialist and generalist commentators.

By providing rigorous, unbiased assessments and recommendations of drugs and other treatments for diseases, this journal can be relied upon by doctors, pharmacists and other healthcare professionals who are looking to make evidence based decisions to ensure their patients receive the best possible care.

Access is granted via Shibboleth for SGUL staff and students, and via OpenAthens for NHS staff.

The NHS Healthcare Databases Advanced Search (HDAS) has changed!

A new version of the HDAS interface for searching databases like Medline and CINAHL, available via OpenAthens, has been launched.  Many of the search functions will remain unchanged, but there are some new features and processes (including how to edit, limit and save your search).

We are in the process of updating our library webpages with videos and guides on how to use the new interface, but in the meantime you might find it useful to look at the series of help videos created by NICE.

Please note that you can still choose to use the old version for the moment, but this is due to be switched off by the end of the year.  We will let you know when a date has been finalised.

As always, if you require any help with using the databases or want to brush up your literature searching skills, please book on to one of our training sessions or email liaison@sgul.ac.uk to book a 1:1 session with one of your librarians at a time that suits you.

This week is International Open Access Week

oawbanner
On 8th September 2016 the BBC reported that a British student, Will Broadway, has invented a mobile fridge designed to transport vaccines that will affect the lives of millions of people around the world. Another noteworthy aspect to this story is that the student will not be seeking to patent the invention:

“I wanted to make something for people who have next to nothing. It should be a basic human right, in my opinion, to have a vaccination. “I don’t think that it should be patented to restrict use.”

With this week being International Open Access week, this story is a great demonstration of how choosing to put ‘open’ into action can bring benefits to the medical and healthcare world.

Open Access week is an international event that seeks to highlight the benefits of Open Access, as well as celebrating the achievements in making research openly available. The Open Access movement has been around for some time, and building upon the Budapest Open Access Initiative in 2002, funders like the Wellcome Trust & Medical Research Council introduced Open Access policies in 2006. Over the course of the past 10 years the move to making research freely and openly available has gathered momentum. Many research funders now require any research that they support to be made available as Open Access and actively support the dissemination of research findings to encourage further discoveries. The Wellcome Trust is even going so far as to launch its own platform to allow researchers to easily and quickly publish their findings – on the Wellcome Open Research site.

Here at St George’s we too are playing our part, the Institutional Repository, SORA, has been steadily growing and currently has over 1500 research papers deposited within it that are either immediately open access, or will be openly available after a short embargo period. This includes important papers such as the recent paper by Professor Dalgleish et al, which was highlighted by St George’s recently, which has highlighted significant advances in the treatment of pancreatic cancer, and is an article that is fully open access.

More about SGUL research in SORA:

  • 1,500 full text & rising (immediately open or open after short embargo)
  • All work is peer reviewed
  • Full text in indexed in Google & Hunter
  • Average downloads per month so far in 2016: 1370

oa-usage-graph

What you can do

  • So, for Open Access week, why not have a look at SORA and discover the benefits of Open Research?
  • Look out for Open Access Week tweets from @sgullibrary
  • Join the movement to put open into action

For more information on open access please visit the Library open access webpages, or contact openaccess@sgul.ac.uk

Chrissie Phillips
Jennifer Smith
Research Publications and Open Access

World Physiotherapy Day

This September 8th is World Physiotherapy Day, a global event that aims to celebrate the role that Physiotherapists play in keeping us well, mobile and independent.

Building on the findings of the World Health Organisation’s (WHO) World Report on Ageing and Health, the theme for this year’s event is ‘Add life to years’. As our ageing population continues to grow, (with an expected 2 billion people over the age of 60 by the year 2050) the focus of the campaign is the contribution and cost effectiveness of physiotherapy in healthy ageing.

WPTD2016_infographic_A4_FINAL-1

To mark the occasion, we’ve put together a collection of resources available from St George’s Library to our support our students and Physiotherapists in practice. We’ve also highlighted some other useful links, including websites, tweet chats and other social media tools that may be useful in supporting Physiotherapists throughout their career.

Click the image below to view the collection:

FB_WPTD2016_1

You can also explore all of our other curated collections of resources here: https://wakelet.com/@sgullibrary