Applying the Skills: Literature Searching e-learning final module now available

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The final module, How to Search the Healthcare Databases, of the seven module How to Search the Literature Effectively programme has now been published. The programme aims to help health and social care professionals develop confidence in searching for and identifying relevant articles in support of work, study and research.

Each modules features a mix of explanatory material, video demonstrations and opportunities to ‘check understanding’ via practice search screens.

Module 1 Introduction to searching
Module 2 Where do I start searching?
Module 3 How do I start to develop a search strategy?
Module 4 Too many results? How to narrow your search
Module 5 Too few results? How to broaden your search
Module 6 Searching with subject headings
Module 7 How to search the Healthcare Databases (HDAS)

See our blog post New NHS e-learning programme on literature searching now available for an overview of the programme.

Module seven pulls together skills learnt from the earlier modules and encourages users to apply that learning when using the Healthcare Databases Advanced Search (HDAS). The module can be completed as a part of the whole programme, or as a standalone module for users already familiar with literature searching but who would like to try searching the Healthcare Databases for the first time or need to refresh their skills.

All modules are freely available and can be accessed without the need to login on the eLearning for Healthcare web site https://www.e-lfh.org.uk/programmes/literature-searching/. If you wish to record and save your learning you will need to login via NHS OpenAthens.

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Library staff recommend: Science and Medicine bestsellers (part 2)

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This summer, we’re highlighting parts of our collection that you might not have come across before: popular science titles that you’ll find peppered throughout the library shelves. Over the past few weeks, Library and LTS staff have been reading and reviewing a selection of books: many of which are now on display by the helpdesk for you to borrow. You can also browse our handpicked selection here: http://wke.lt/w/s/q3KeB

Take a look at some of our recommended reads below. You can find part one of our staff book reviews here.

 

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

For another insight in to the world of neurosurgery you may also like ‘Do no harm’, neurosurgeon Henry Marsh’s memoir of his life and work at St George’s.

‘When breath becomes air’ is the autobiography of Paul Kalanithi – neurosurgeon-neuroscientist and writer. The book charts his journey to medicine via English Literature and Human Biology, through the gruelling training in neurosurgery, to his experiences on the other side of the doctor-patient relationship following his diagnosis with stage 4 lung cancer just as he was approaching the end of his neurosurgical residency:

“Instead of being the pastoral figure aiding a life transition, I found myself the sheep, lost and confused.”

The different phases of the book are woven together by Kalanithi’s thoughtful and tender exploration of the question, what gives life meaning? Navigated variously through literature and philosophy, through the visceral experience of practising medicine, and with deep personal insight as he comes to terms with his own diagnosis and prognosis. I believe that what you’ll take from this book is as deeply personal as the story itself, but that overall the book is profoundly life affirming and speaks of the importance of hope in the most difficult of circumstances.

Verity Allison
Journals and e-Resources Librarian

 

Bodies by Jed Mercurio

An unforgiving and at times confronting read, Bodies is one of those rare books that sticks in the mind long after the last page.

Bodies is a disturbing, fascinating and truly compelling fictional account from the front line of hospital life in the late twentieth century.

This first novel by Jed Mercurio, a former doctor turned drama writer whose recent works include the award-winning TV series Line of Duty, was later adapted by the BBC. It charts the day-to-day experiences of the book’s unnamed narrator, who as the story begins has arrived at the hospital for his first day as a newly qualified houseman.

From the start the reader is immersed in the gritty reality of life as a junior doctor: the gruelling hours, lack of sleep, urgent references to the Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine and the life and death decisions that have to be made on a daily basis. Mistakes are inevitably made, and the reader shares the narrator’s distress as he struggles with how a simple misjudgment can lead to the most severe of consequences.

The narrator doesn’t flinch as he reveals the reality of the battlefield of hospital life, seamlessly blending stomach-turning episodes on the wards with his own personal life.The reality of his work impacts his faith and also his relationships, which are graphically recounted alongside his work.

As the story progresses, the idealism that a new young doctor brings is tested. He is presented with moral dilemmas and decisions of conscience which force the reader to wonder what path they would take when faced with the reality we have seen through his eyes. An unforgiving and at times confronting read, Bodies is one of those rare books that sticks in the mind long after the last page.

Emily Daniel
Information Assistant

 

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat by Oliver Sacks

This book will capture the imagination of all and take you down the rabbit hole into the wonderland of the human brain.

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat is comprised of a series of case histories of Oliver Sacks’ patients. Sacks, a neurologist, writes about some of the more unique and baffling cases he has come across throughout his career. His patients have different neurological disorders that lead them to navigate the world and their own sense of self in mysterious, startling and sometimes heart-breaking ways. Written over thirty years ago, our knowledge of the nervous system has since developed and some of the terminology is outdated. What makes this book still current is that Sacks does not claim to have all the answers – the brain was then, as it remains now, largely an enigma.

Reading the book, I couldn’t help but ask, how do we make sense of the world, and of our place in it, when perception, memory and cognitive function has gone? For many of us it’s our worst nightmare; we suppose that to lose our past and our sense of the familiar, would be to lose our humanity. The patients in Sacks’ book show a remarkable ability to strive for meaning and identity.

The namesake of the book, Dr P, is a man who has lost his ability to understand what he can see in front of him. In one occurrence, Dr P stares at a glove, pondering over what this strange object with its “five outpouchings” could be. Upon placing his hand within the object he makes sense of its function. It is only then that he declares that it is a glove! He has lost the ability to recognise faces, hence mistaking his wife for a hat. He can perceive features, but not the whole. As a talented musician, he instead ‘sees’ through music: “He had no body-image, he had body-music: this is why he could move and act as fluently as he did”.

Sacks reveals these stories in a frank and humorous light. Sacks aims with this book to “restore the human subject at the centre” of medical case studies. Disease and the individual are not separate entities. Sacks argues that much of the behaviours of his patients are not manifestations of disease. They are an “organised chaos”, responsive to the absolute confusion of disease, through sheer will or desire to live. It encourages the medical profession to positively focus on faculties that remain, or that flourish, under pervading diseases. For those of us without a scientific background, it encourages us to wonder at the marvel of what the human brain is capable of and question what we perceive as ‘lesser’ or ‘deficient’.

Catriona Robertson
FHSCE Liaison Support Librarian

 

The Man Who Couldn’t Stop – David Adam

“I can’t think of a single positive thing about OCD. And I’ve thought about OCD a lot.”

Writer David Adam is fairly unequivocal on the question of whether OCD might have an upside; but he also understands how the largely hidden nature of the suffering it causes might lead to such misperceptions – to the ‘little bit OCD’ of popular imagination. A science journalist who has himself had OCD for over twenty years, Adam realised he might be well-placed to shine a clearer light on the condition; “The Man Who Couldn’t Stop” is the result.

He takes as his starting point the intrusive thoughts and doubts that lie at the heart of OCD – and finds they are actually surprisingly common to us all. So what is it that happens differently in the small number of people who can’t let go of these thoughts – who go on to develop OCD? In the search for answers, Adam takes us on a journey through genetics, childhood experience and misfiring brain circuits among other things. And while he admits there is much still to be understood, he finds some intriguing possibilities.

But it’s perhaps in recounting his own experiences that Adam is able to shine the brightest light – describing with unswerving honesty how it feels to live in the grip of obsessive doubt; or the long journey to find the treatment that keeps that keeps those thoughts – mostly – under control today. His book manages to give both a readable introduction to the evidence, and a voice to personal experiences that have sometimes been overlooked.

Hilary Garrett
Information Assistant

 

Student Recommended: a Guide to Mendeley

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Hafssa Anfishi, one of St George’s Learning Advocates has reviewed Mendeley, a free resource which can help you with referencing. Hafssa is in her second year of the Biomedical Science course and found Mendeley useful when completing her SSP. Select the link below to read her step-by-step guide on how to use this tool.

How to use Mendeley. A step-by-step guide by Hafssa Anfishi


A note from the library

There are many tools out there which can help you with referencing and citations. However, you should be careful that they are referencing according to the standard required by your course. Don’t forget that this is something that you will be assessed on. You are always responsible for double-checking your references to ensure that they are correct.

St George’s Library provides access to a tool called RefWorks which can also help with referencing and reference management. We can offer training and support in using this resource as well as general referencing support. For more information, consult the help page of the library website or contact the library.

Copyright: What NHS staff need to know

CLA NHS England copyright- posterThe rules regarding copyright and knowing what you can legally copy can be confusing. Questions about copyright might arise when considering whether a journal club can print multiple copies of an article for members? Whether staff are allowed to distribute printed or digital copies of articles to other colleagues? How much of a book are you legally allowed to photocopy?

The CLA Licence for NHS staff in England is the licence that provides the terms for what NHS staff are allowed to photocopy, scan and share from most copyrighted print and digital works.

What is covered by the licence?

The licence allows individuals to make copies from almost everything which has been purchased, subscribed or donated to the NHS in England. There are a small number of excluded works, if you’re unsure if a work is covered by the licence then the best way to check is via the CLA’s Check Permissions tool https://www.cla.co.uk/index.php/nhs-england-licence

Who is covered by the licence?

The licence covers all staff working for or contracted by the NHS including primary and acute care staff, public health staff employed by local authorities, those working for DHSC arms’-lengths bodies and special health authorities, and those providing NHS-commissioned care such as Hospice staff. The licence also covers HEI students and staff who are on temporary or permanent placements with the NHS in England.

What can be copied under the licence?

  • 2 articles from a single journal issue or several articles from an issue if it is dedicated to a particular theme.
  • 1 chapter or 5% of a book (whichever is the greatest)
  • There are no restrictions on how many copies you can make, and you can make copies of copies too.
  • Digital copies can be stored – but they must be kept on your own PC or a secure network which you may share with colleagues.
  • Only single paper copies can be made for patients or carers

What can I share?

You may share print or digital copies with work colleagues covered by the licence including via email.

What else do I need to know?

You are obligated to protect the rights of copyright owners, to always copy within the limits of the licence and to always acknowledge sources of information when writing.

More information about copyright can be found at the Copyright Licencing Agency website

A poster is also available for staff to display next to photocopiers.

Or if you have any questions regarding the copying and sharing of copyrighted works for NHS staff please contact the NHS Liaison Team liaison@sgul.ac.uk

New NHS e-learning programme on literature searching now available

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A new e-learning programme providing guidance on how to plan and carry out literature searches is now available on the e-Learning for Healthcare (e-LfH) platform. The project is intended for both clinical and non-clinical healthcare staff, and aims to help develop confidence in searching for and identifying relevant articles in support of work, study and research.

The seven module course is specifically for those with less experience in searching healthcare databases for literature, or those who wish to refresh their knowledge of the principles of effective searching. Each of the short modules can be completed in 20 minutes or less, and have been designed such that they might be used individually, or completed as a course.

The first three modules titled, ‘Building the Foundations’, were launched in November of 2017 and provide users with some guidance on the resources that are available, how to get started with planning a search, and the use of OR/AND in combining search terms.

The second set of three modules, ‘Developing the skills’, has recently been made available, and these focus on how to narrow a search when too many results are returned, how to broaden searches with too few results, as well as covering how to search using subject headings.

The seventh and final module on ‘Applying the skills’ will be available in April 2018.

You can access the modules password-free, but if want to record and save your learning, log in via NHS OpenAthens. To access the e-learning  visit: https://www.e-lfh.org.uk/programmes/literature-searching/

Saving Your MyiLibrary ebook notes before the Ebook Central Upgrade

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On 21st March all e-books on the Myilibrary platform will move to a new platform called Ebook Central. Unless you save any notes you have made in MyiLibrary ebooks before 21st March you will lose them after the upgrade.

Here’s how to save any notes you have made in MyiLibrary ebooks you have read online (not in books you’ve downloaded).

Step 1: Log in to MyiLibrary.

Step 2: Select My Account at the top of the home page, then select Notes from the drop-down menu. You will see the list of books you have added annotated notes to.

Step 3: Select the titles from which you want to preserve your notes.

Step 4: Choose to either print your notes or email them to yourself. If you choose to email your notes, you will receive an HTML-based message from notes@ingramdigital.com that includes the book titles, the page numbers associated with your notes, and the note titles. Also included will be a link to each note page in MyiLibrary, although these links will not be valid once the Ebook Central upgrade is complete.

For further information contact the library at liaison@sgul.ac.uk or visit the Research Enquiries desk from 11am – 4pm Monday to Friday in the library.