Information Skills Training Sessions July – September 2018

Info Skills Sessions July- september 2018 -blog banner

Dates for our July – September 2018 Information Skill Training Sessions are below. Please see our information skills training page for full details. Contact liaison@sgul.ac.uk to book a session.

Library Inductions for NHS Staff

Recommended for: NHS staff

Wednesday 4th July 10:00 – 11:00

Wednesday 1st Aug 10:00 – 11:00

Wednesday 5th Sept 10:00 – 11:00

Finding the evidence

Recommended for: NHS staff

Friday 13th July 13:00 – 15:00

Weds 22nd August 11:00 – 13:00

Thurs 13th September 11:00 – 13:00

Systematic reviews – Finding and managing the evidence

Recommended for: NHS staff & researchers

Thursday 26th July 13:00 – 16:00

Tuesday 21st August 13:00 -16:00

Introduction to critical appraisal

Recommended for: NHS staff & researchers

Tuesday 17th July 14:00-15:30

Citation metrics – an overview

Recommended for: Researchers or SGUL/FHSCE staff and students

Monday 16th July 12:00 – 13:00

The following courses are available on request, please email liaison@sgul.ac.uk for details

Getting Started with Twitter

Recommended: For anyone wanting to get familiar with Twitter

RefWorks

Recommended for: SGUL/FHSCE staff and students

Keeping up-to-date

Recommended for: NHS staff & researchers#

Searching databases using EbscoHost

Recommended for: SGUL/FHSCE staff and students

Searching databases using OvidSP

Recommended for: SGUL/FHSCE staff and students

Personalised training

If you cannot make any of the times, we are happy to arrange sessions for either individual or larger groups depending on your needs. To organise a bespoke session please email us at liaison@sgul.ac.uk

Advertisements

The NHS in England at 70

To celebrate 70 years of the NHS, St George’s Library takes a look over its history

As the NHS marks its 70th year, a look over its history can help to draw into focus the achievements of its time so far, along with the changes that have taken place both within the service itself and in the society which it serves. Created on the basis that good quality healthcare should be available to all, the NHS rested upon three core principles: that it meet the needs of everyone; that it be free at the point of delivery; and that it be based on clinical need, not the ability to pay. These principles retain their importance 70 years on.

At its inauguration in 1948 the NHS was a three part system, with hospitals, general practice and local health authorities being run separately, though by the 1960s this model was increasingly seen to be ineffective. Numerous reports during the 1960s set out recommendations for the future development and structure of the service, but it was 1974 before the NHS was reorganised into regional authorities covering all three parts of the system. In the intervening period, authority for NHS services has continued to change, from 1991 when the first NHS Trusts were established, to 2002 with the introduction of Primary Care Trusts, and the current situation which gives authority and responsibility to Clinical Commisioning Groups (CCGs) and NHS Foundation Trusts, amongst others.

Amidst the 70 year history of the NHS, sit a number of innovations in treatment. The first kidney transplant was carried out in 1960, the first IVF baby was born in 1978, and the first successful gene therapy took place in 2002. In addition, changes to the approach to treatment have taken place, such as the Mental Health Act 1983, which introduced the issue of consent to treatment; under the prior Act of 1959, there was no requirement for patient consent.

Underpinning developments in healthcare services and practice all the while, has been the accessibility and use of relevant information and knowledge. As outlined by a blog post on The King’s Fund website, that organisation (when named King Edward’s Hospital Fund for London) provided an information service for hospitals and other organisations interested in hospital work even before the advent of the NHS. In November 1948 the service was formalised as the Division of Hospital Facilities, which included an Information Bureau and a Reference Library.

Today, Health Education England continues that commitment to enable NHS staff to access the information that can help shape good quality healthcare, and the library at St George’s is one of 215 NHS library services that supports NHS staff access and use of information resources for study, research and clinical practice. St George’s Library existed before the advent of the NHS as it supported St George’s Hospital and Medical School going back to the 1700s. Fortunately, developments in the provision of library services have also taken place over the years, meaning that current members no longer have to observe the following regulation:

11. A Member wishing to read a Book in the Reading Room must write the title of the Book, and his name on a piece of paper, and hand it to the Librarian, who alone is to take books from the shelves and replace them.

(Historic Regulations for the Library and Reading Room of St George’s Medical School)

The NHS70 website provides more on the history and the future of the National Health Service, as well as up to date news on celebrations of this milestone. The NHS England website also provides a decade by decade timeline of the service outlining more of the significant medical developments and innovations to have taken place in the NHS, alongside the key pieces of legislation and structural changes affecting the delivery of services by NHS staff throughout the past 70 years.

web-banner-700x129px

NHS OpenAthens resources now accessible through Google Scholar and PubMed

All St George’s Trust staff with OpenAthens accounts now have access to those resources directly from Google Scholar and PubMed. The display of OpenAthens links in these platforms can be set up by following a few quick steps.

Setting up Google Scholar links:

  1. Click on the menu at the top left of the Google Scholar home page
  2. Select ‘Settings’
  3. Select ‘Library links’
  4. Search for ‘st george’
  5. Select ‘St George’s University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust’
  6. Click Save

All searches in Google Scholar will display a ‘St George’s Trust OpenAthens’ link next to results where full-text is available:

scholar

(Note that these steps need to be followed separately on each device you use).

Setting up PubMed links:

  1. Login to My NCBI. If you do not have an account, register here
  2. Under ‘Filters’, ensure that PubMed is selected in the drop-down menu, and click on ‘Manage Filters’
  3. Select LinkOut from the available filter categories, and search for St George’s
  4. Next to the entry for St George’s University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, check the boxes under the Filter and Link Icon columns

All searches in PubMed will display a ‘St George’s Trust OpenAthens’ filter when you are signed in to My NCBI. When viewing the abstract of an individual result, where full-text is available a St George’s Library icon will be displayed under ‘Full text links’ on the right of the page:

 

More detailed step-by-step guides are available on the SGUL Library website.

Book Stock Delivery on Friday 15th June

Life in the library never stands still and tomorrow, Friday 15th June, we are expecting a big book stock delivery to add to our collection. The couriers will be delivering the books at around 12pm via the silent and quiet study areas. This means that there may be some disruption over lunch for a couple of hours. We apologise in advance for any inconvenience.

books

Quick Guide to Placing Holds

holds cover hunter

 

 

 

 

It’s now easier than ever to reserve a book that’s out on loan using the Library’s search tool, Hunter.

First check the Locations tab to find out whether the book you want is available. If all copies are out on loan, you’ll be able to reserve a copy. Just follow the three steps below:

no 1 fadeIf you haven’t already, sign in to Hunter.

  • SGUL staff and students can sign in with their SGUL username and password
  • NHS staff can find out their Hunter login (which is different from the Library username and password) by asking at the Library Helpdesk or emailing library@sgul.ac.uk

Hunter 1

no 2 fadeAfter you sign in, a Place hold option appears. Click here…

Hunter 2 full

no 3 fade…and select Request.

Hunter 3 option b

Hold placed

 

Hunter confirms that your hold is placed.

When a copy of the book becomes available you’ll receive an email, and will then have one week to collect it from the Library Helpdesk.

Times Higher Education: full online access for SGUL staff and students

THE-LogoFollowing an upgrade to our subscription, SGUL staff and students now have unlimited online access to content from Times Higher Education.

THE is a weekly online and print publication carrying news, features and opinion on higher education in the UK and around the world.

 

To activate your access, you will need to register on the THE homepage using your SGUL email address. Please note that by doing this, you agree to the Times Higher Education cookie policy and terms and conditions.

Setting up your access

1) Visit THE’s homepage at https://www.timeshighereducation.com.

THE website can also be accessed via Hunter, the library’s search tool, via this link.

2) Select the person icon at top right and choose Register.

THE register

 

 

 

 

3) Remember to register with your @sgul.ac.uk email address for full access. You’ll also be asked to choose a password and username.

Accessing content

You should now have full access to all the latest content on the homepage, or you can browse past issues by opening the Professional menu and selecting Digital Editions.

THE digital editions new

For reading on mobile devices, a free app is available from Google Play or the iTunes App Store. Log in to the app using the username and password you chose when you created your account. You’ll now be able to download current and past issues to your device, read and share articles and save favourites to an in-app scrapbook.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 

Copyright: What NHS staff need to know

CLA NHS England copyright- posterThe rules regarding copyright and knowing what you can legally copy can be confusing. Questions about copyright might arise when considering whether a journal club can print multiple copies of an article for members? Whether staff are allowed to distribute printed or digital copies of articles to other colleagues? How much of a book are you legally allowed to photocopy?

The CLA Licence for NHS staff in England is the licence that provides the terms for what NHS staff are allowed to photocopy, scan and share from most copyrighted print and digital works.

What is covered by the licence?

The licence allows individuals to make copies from almost everything which has been purchased, subscribed or donated to the NHS in England. There are a small number of excluded works, if you’re unsure if a work is covered by the licence then the best way to check is via the CLA’s Check Permissions tool https://www.cla.co.uk/index.php/nhs-england-licence

Who is covered by the licence?

The licence covers all staff working for or contracted by the NHS including primary and acute care staff, public health staff employed by local authorities, those working for DHSC arms’-lengths bodies and special health authorities, and those providing NHS-commissioned care such as Hospice staff. The licence also covers HEI students and staff who are on temporary or permanent placements with the NHS in England.

What can be copied under the licence?

  • 2 articles from a single journal issue or several articles from an issue if it is dedicated to a particular theme.
  • 1 chapter or 5% of a book (whichever is the greatest)
  • There are no restrictions on how many copies you can make, and you can make copies of copies too.
  • Digital copies can be stored – but they must be kept on your own PC or a secure network which you may share with colleagues.
  • Only single paper copies can be made for patients or carers

What can I share?

You may share print or digital copies with work colleagues covered by the licence including via email.

What else do I need to know?

You are obligated to protect the rights of copyright owners, to always copy within the limits of the licence and to always acknowledge sources of information when writing.

More information about copyright can be found at the Copyright Licencing Agency website

A poster is also available for staff to display next to photocopiers.

Or if you have any questions regarding the copying and sharing of copyrighted works for NHS staff please contact the NHS Liaison Team liaison@sgul.ac.uk