Pop-up Library: Thursday 7th March 12-2pm

WBD social media

To mark World Book Day on Thursday 7th March, we’re hosting a lunchtime pop-up library outside the University reception. Come by the stall between 12pm and 2pm to borrow books, hear library staff book suggestions or make your own. We’ll have a range of books from fiction to medical bestsellers, with a particular focus on female writers in fiction and science to celebrate Academic Book Week (4-9 March) and International Women’s Day (8 March). Make sure you bring along your ID card to borrow a book.

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St George’s Library in Numbers: 2018

2018 was a year of change for St George’s Library. We introduced a new library management system, which underpins the circulation of library items. In the summer, we upgraded Hunter’s interface for a more intuitive search tool. Alongside these changes, we introduced automatic renewals and additional loans. This means our users can now borrow more books for longer.

As well as improving access to resources, we continued to offer support to our users. Our new Subject Library Guides provide targeted online support to students and our refreshed information skills training sessions offer face-to-face workshops on a range of topics. Our institutional open access and research data repositories have continued to expand.

It’s not just the library staff who were busy in 2018. Our users made great use of the library: there was more footfall in the library, searches in Hunter and downloads of e-resources than in 2017. The info-graphic below shows some stats from the library in 2018. Click on the link underneath to download the PDF.

Resources

We developed our collection throughout the past year. We purchased 2246 new books which were added to the library shelves. After a successful trial of JOVE (Journal of Visualized Experiments) we added this resource to our subscribed databases. Library members ran 353,069 Hunter searches 2018 – that’s 29, 422* searches every single week! Well over half a million journal articles were downloaded, 691,858 to be precise, and 26,784 books were borrowed.

Services

Footfall was high last year and 45,000* of you visited the library every month. Over 1000 new students attended library inductions at the start of the year and many more students attended further library sessions throughout the year. The NHS Liaison team conducted 88 Cares searches to support clinical activity and decision making.

Research

St George’s Data Repository, powered by figshare, was launched in 2017. Last year, it gained 24 new public deposits and had 661* monthly views. St George’s Online Research Archive (SORA) had 2325* downloads per month and 2980 full-text items publicly available.

We’ve enjoyed looking back on 2018 but we’re also excited for what 2019 will bring. It’s not even mid-way through January and already we’ve seen the arrival of new self-service machines. These machines will make it easier to borrow multiple items – simply stack your books on top of each other and they will all be issued. As we increased the number of items that you could borrow last year, this new feature should come in handy!

*approximate average based on 2018 figures

Information Skills Training Sessions January – March 2019

Info Skills Sessions Jan - Mar 2019 -blog banner

Dates for our January – March 2019 Information Skill Training Sessions are below. Please see our Information Skills Training page for full details. Contact liaison@sgul.ac.uk to book a session.

Getting Results: Finding healthcare literature for your learning and research

This session is for SGUL/FHSCE students and staff who are carrying out more in-depth research, such as for a literature review, dissertation, research project etc.

Recommended for: SGUL/FHSCE staff and students

Wednesday 6th Feb 11:00 -12:30

Wednesday 20th Feb 10:30 – 12:00

Thursday 7th March 11:00 -12:30

Monday 25th March 14:00 -15:30

Systematic reviews – Finding and managing the evidence

Systematic literature searching for systematic reviews, research projects or service developments.

Recommended for: NHS staff & researchers

Wednesday 23rd Jan 13:00-16:00

Wednesday 27th Feb 10:00-13:00

Wednesday 27th Mar 13:00-16:00

Introduction to critical appraisal

Introduction to the concepts of critical appraisal and evaluating healthcare literature.

Recommended for: NHS staff & researchers

Wednesday 30th Jan 15:00-16:30

Wednesday 20th Mar 10:30-12:00

Citation metrics – an overview

An overview of traditional and alternative metrics, with the opportunity for hands on exploration of a range of metrics.

Recommended for: Researchers or SGUL/FHSCE staff and students

Monday 21st Jan 12:00 – 13:00

Finding the evidence

Introduction to healthcare resources and training in how use them effectively to support evidence-based clinical practice or decision-making.

Recommended for: NHS staff

Monday 21st Jan 14:00 – 16:00

Wednesday 13th Feb 15:00-17:00

Thursday 21st Mar 14:00 – 16:00

Library Inductions for NHS Staff

Recommended for: NHS staff

Wednesday 2nd Jan 10:00 – 11:00

Wednesday 6th Feb 10:00 – 11:00

Wednesday 6th Mar 10:00 – 11:00

Keeping up-to-date

Introduction to a range of services that will help you keep up to date with current literature.

Recommended for: NHS staff & researchers

Friday 22nd March 14:00 – 15:30

Getting Started with Twitter

A session for those new to Twitter, offering a hands-on practical workshop exploring this growing social media platform, with particular focus on how Twitter can be used in a professional context.

Recommended: For anyone wanting to get familiar with Twitter

Tuesday 26th Feb 13:00 -14:30

Thursday 21st Mar 10:00 – 11:30

The following course is available on request, please email liaison@sgul.ac.uk for details

Refworks

Recommended for: SGUL/FHSCE staff and students

Personalised training

If you cannot make any of the times, we are happy to arrange sessions for either individual or larger groups depending on your needs. To organise a bespoke session please email us at liaison@sgul.ac.uk

Festive reading from St George’s Library

Library staff have been busy searching Hunter this week to find some scientific (and not-so-scientific) festive reading for you, all in the name of spreading some good cheer. Have a look at our highlights below – we’ve linked to the Hunter record or full-text where possible.


Have you ever wondered why Rudolph’s nose is red? This intriguing observational study from 2012 sheds some light on the matter:

Rudolph - BMJ

Intrigued by the occupational health hazards that Father Christmas might experience in his very unique role? This commentary explores some of the issues and recommends a comprehensive workplace occupational health program for the man himself:

Santa - Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology

That isn’t the only paper that is concerned with Father Christmas’ calorie consumption. The authors below present some quite worrying calculations:

Santa Calories.png

Other researchers have concentrated their efforts on debunking the ‘naughty or nice’ myth, concluding that there are a number of socioeconomic reasons why Santa is, unfortunately, less likely to visit children in hospital. This is thankfully counterbalanced by the wonderful work NHS staff do to make the festive period special for their patients:

Father Christmas - BMJ.png

This next paper demonstrates that decorating your Christmas tree might not be such a festive activity if you have a colophonium allergy:

Christmas Tree - Contact Dermatitis.png

Finally, if you aren’t a Brussels sprouts fan, but feel duty-bound to eat some over the holidays, you might be pleased to hear that a nice glass of tannin-rich Cabernet Sauvignon might help improve the taste:

Brussels Sprouts - Journal of Texture Studies

 

Happy reading!

 

References:

Carpenter, G. et al. (2018) ‘Wine astringency reduces flavour intensity of Brussels sprouts’. To be published in Journal of Texture Studies [Preprint]. Available at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jtxs.12378 (Accessed: 18 December 2018).

Gether, L., Gyldenløve, M. and Thyssen, J.P. (2017) ‘Christmas tree dermatitis caused by colophonium allergy’, Contact Dermatitis, 77(6), pp. 412-414. Available at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/cod.12798 (Accessed: 18 December 2018).

Ince, C. et al. (2012) ‘Why Rudolph’s nose is red: observational study’, BMJ, 345:e8311, pp. 1-6. Available at: https://www.bmj.com/content/bmj/345/bmj.e8311.full.pdf (Accessed: 18 December 2018).

Park, J.J. et al. (2016) ‘Dispelling the nice or naughty myth: retrospective observational study of Santa Claus’, BMJ, 355:i6355, pp. 1-5. Available at: https://www.bmj.com/content/bmj/355/bmj.i6355.full.pdf (Accessed: 18 December 2018).

Straube, S. and Fan, X. (2015) ‘The occupational health of Santa Claus’, Journal of Occupational Health and Toxicology, 10(44), pp. 1-3. Available: https://occup-med.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12995-015-0086-1 (Accessed: 18 December 2018).

Wormser, G.P. and Ladenheim, A. (2018) ‘How many calories did Santa Claus consume on Christmas Eve?’, Wiener klinische Wochenschrift, 130(1-2), pp. 73-75. Available at: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00508-017-1306-8 (Accessed: 18 December 2018).

A year’s worth of Open Research and SGUL

A year's worth of Open Research and SGULIf you are a researcher at SGUL, we are here to help you share and preserve your data, and publish in a way that meets your funder open access mandates, as many have a commitment to making data and publications as openly available as possible.

SGUL has two repositories to enable researchers to share and preserve both data and publications: read on for more facts and figures about how adding your work to these ties in with our Strategic Plan to maximise the impact of our research.

Research Data

In late 2017 the Research Data Management Service announced our pilot Research Data Repository. In 2018 we published more than 20 outputs to the repository including the official proceedings from SGUL’s Education Day (2017), presentations from Infection and Immunity’s annual INTERTB symposium, and, to mark World AIDS Day this December, the Centre for Global Health released the first of six free training modules to share SGUL expertise on treating one of the biggest causes of HIV-related mortality in Africa. Our work has been viewed, downloaded and shared locally and internationally.

Contact the Research Data Management Service to talk about sharing your data, powerpoint presentations, posters and videos on the repository.

This year also saw the introduction of new Europe-wide data protection legislation. How could we forget that? Our team worked closely with colleagues across St George’s and external organisations to support our researchers in the run-up to 25 May. Our GDPR and Health Research blog post was part of that awareness raising campaign.

In 2018 SGUL’s Information Management (IM) Team was also formed. Made up of our Information Governance Manager, Data Protection Officer, Freedom of Information Officer, Archivist, Records Manager and Research Data Manager, the IM Team looks to streamline information flows across St George’s and raise awareness of information policies and good practice. We run regular seminars on IM.

Contact our Records Manager for more information.

 

384px-Open_Access_logo_PLoS_transparent.svgOpen Access publications

On the publications front, the number of articles now free to read via SORA (St George’s Online Research Archive) has been steadily increasing, driven by the open access mandate for the 2021 REF (for more on this, see our webpages).   We now have nearly 3000 articles publicly accessible via SORA with more being added all the time. Downloads of the articles is also rising; up to 2,300+ downloads per month on average in 2018 (from 1,800+ downloads per month on average in 2017). As with data, the articles have a global reach, being downloaded by readers in all parts of the world.

Records are included in the open access aggregation platform CORE, which contains over 11 million full-text articles.  CORE is working with trusted parties such as institutional and subject repositories and journals (other sources of articles such as SciHub1 and Research Gate2 have been subject to action by publishers due to copyright infringement). CORE also allows for text mining of the corpus.

This year we also upgraded our CRIS (Current Research Information System). Among other improvements, if you confirm your ORCiD in your CRIS profile, any publications matched in our data sources with your ORCiD will be automatically claimed for you. For more on ORCiDs and the benefits of having one, see our blogpost from earlier this year.

Contact us at sora@sgul.ac.uk if you would like guidance on keeping your CRIS publication lists & metrics up to date.

 

Funder initiatives

Funder mandates and publisher policies around open access to research are an area of constant evolution. This year has seen the announcement of Wellcome Trust’s plans to update their open access policy for 2020, to ensure all Wellcome-funded research articles are made freely available at the time of publication, and Plan S, which aims to require all research articles funded by the coalition of research funding organisations behind the plan be published in open access journals, or on open access platforms.

Plan S has certainly caught the attention of publishers – for example it has been welcomed with caveats by the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers3, and Nature recently reported it has support in China4

SGUL researchers have benefited from negotiations by Jisc Collections5 with publishers around subscriptions and open access charges; for instance in being able to publish open access for free under the Springer Open Choice agreement.

Contact us via openaccess@sgul.ac.uk if you have any questions about how to meet your funder open access policies.

 

Lastly, special thanks to all of our researchers who have answered our calls to be involved with open research.

In particular, to the laboratory researchers who opened up their groups, projects and labs to us earlier this year and told us all about their data and records management practices. We have now produced a report on our findings and will be building on this work in the New Year.

And to all who have been making their papers open access, as we work towards the next REF.

We hope to see or hear from you in 2019

Michelle Harricharan, Research Data Support Manager
Jenni Hughes, Research Publications Assistant
Jennifer Smith, Research Publications Librarian

 

Contacts

CRIS & Deposit on acceptance: sora@sgul.ac.uk

Open Access Publications: openaccess@sgul.ac.uk

Research Data Management: researchdata@sgul.ac.uk

 

References

1. Page, B. Publishers succeed in getting Sci-Hub access blocked in Russia. The Bookseller [Internet]. 2018 Dec 11 [cited 2018 Dec 13]. Available from: https://www.thebookseller.com/news/sci-hub-blocked-russia-following-court-action-publishers-911571

2. McKenzie, L. Publishers escalate legal battle against ResearchGate. Inside Higher Ed [Internet]. 2018 Oct 4 [cited 2018 Dec 13]. Available from: https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2018/10/04/publishers-accuse-researchgate-mass-copyright-infringement

3. STM. STM statement on Plan S: Accelerating the transition to full and immediate Open Access to scientific publications [Internet]. The Hague: International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers; 2018 [cited 2018 Dec 13]. Available from: https://www.stm-assoc.org/2018_09_04_STM_Statement_on_PlanS.pdf

4. Schiermeier Q. China backs bold plan to tear down journal paywalls. Nature [Internet]. 2018 Dec 13 [cited 2018 Dec 14]. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/d41586-018-07659-5

5. Earney, L. National licence negotiations advancing the open access transition – a view from the UK. Insights [Internet]. 2018 [cited 2018 Dec 14]; 31 (11). Available from: http://doi.org/10.1629/uksg.412

 


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Holiday Library Tips

xmas banner

Away from SGUL but still need to study over the Christmas break? Read on for more about finding the best online resources for your course, and why taking books home for the holidays is now a little easier. And if you need a quiet place to study, we may be able to help with that too.

1. Use our online resources

Your SGUL login and password give you access to a wide range of online resources – including electronic journals, e-books and tools such as Acland’s Anatomy and BMJ Best Practice – from anywhere with an internet connection.

Find great online resources with LibGuides

All of our new subject-specific LibGuides include:

  • a list of online resources specially selected for your course
  • information about accessing resources from offsite

Check our LibGuides list to see if a guide is available for your course (we’ve also included links to three of the most popular ones below). Our LibGuides collection is growing fast, so if your course isn’t among the 13 listed so far, it may be coming soon.

 

Reset your password before you go

Resetting your password before you leave campus ensures it won’t expire for the next three months. Use the password change link, or drop in to the Library Helpdesk between 8am and 6pm on weekdays.

Forgotten/Expired password?

If your password does expire while you’re away, you may be able to reset it from offsite using this link.

Note: you must have already set up an external email address and if you don’t receive the reset link, check your junk mail folder.

 

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2. Borrowing books over the holiday?

Your books will now renew automatically, as long as no-one else has requested them. So in most cases, the only reminder you’ll autorenewreceive is an email telling you that your items have successfully renewed.

If your book is requested by another user, you’ll receive an email asking you to return it. But you always have until the due date to do this – and this means any item that’s borrowed or renewed from Monday 17th December won’t be requested back before January 2019.

If your book is requested while you’re away from SGUL…

…you will still need to return it by the due date if possible. Overdue books are fined at 20p per day and are invoiced after two weeks.

But if you’re unable to return a book by the due date, we recommend signing in to your account in Hunter where you can attempt to renew it manually. If another copy of the book has been returned, your renewal will succeed – so try this over several days to increase your chances.

Find more detailed guidance in our blog post here.

3. Register to study in a library near you

sconul map

SGUL Library is a member of the SCONUL access scheme, allowing our users reference access to over 170 other university libraries across the UK and Ireland. (Postgraduates may also get limited borrowing rights in some cases.)

To start using the scheme, follow the steps on the SCONUL Access page. Within a few days, and provided there are no fines on your Library account, you’ll receive an email from us which you can take to your chosen library along with your SGUL ID card to apply for access.

(We can’t reply to SCONUL requests between 21st December and 1st January, so please apply by Thursday 20th December to secure your access over this period.)

Free WiFi with Eduroam

Like SGUL, many universities in the UK and worldwide use Eduroam for WiFi. If you’re visiting another university – or just passing nearby – you’ll often pick up the network on a WiFi-enabled phone or laptop and will be able to connect using your SGUL username (remember to include @sgul.ac.uk) and password.