How to find Open Access articles

There are various tools to help you find open access versions of articles that are otherwise only available with a subscription to the journal (or by paying an access fee). These include:

  • OA DOI (https://oadoi.org/): If you know the DOI (digital object identifier) of the article you’re looking for, you can paste it onto the end of this web address to find open access versions of the article.
  • Unpaywall (http://unpaywall.org/): This is a browser extension for Firefox and Google Chrome. Once you’ve installed it, any time you find an article behind a paywall, you can click on the padlock icon on the right hand side of the screen and be taken straight to an open access version of the article, if there’s one available.
  • Open Access Button (https://openaccessbutton.org/): a similar tool to Unpaywall, this also allows you to search for an article directly from their website and request copies of articles from authors.
  • Canary Haz (http://www.canaryhaz.com/): a new tool, currently being tested, which as well as finding open access versions of articles can also help access content the library has subscribed to whilst off campus, and link from the pre-print to the final published version of an article. Sign up required for free service, company will be making a premium version available.

For more information on Open Access have a look at the Library Open Access FAQs

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Changes to library doors

DoorDue to the large volume of noise-related complaints received by the Library over this academic year, we have made some alterations to two access routes within the space. Firstly, and most significantly, is the main library entrance. The glass sliding doors have now been locked, and a push panel swing door has been installed to the right of the original doors. We hope this will greatly reduce the noise transference from the area outside the Library to the study areas, and make for a more conducive study environment.

In addition to this, the manual door between the group study area and the large silent study area has been converted into a fire exit only door. Once again, we have carried out this work in order to reduce the noise transference between these two study spaces.

We value your feedback and comments so please do contact us via an email to library@sgul.ac.uk

Information Skills Training Sessions July – Sept 2017

Dates for our July – Sept 2017 Information Skill Training Sessions are below. Please see our information skills training page for full details and range of sessions available. Contact liaison@sgul.ac.uk to book a session

*New*  Finding the evidence

Finding top quality evidence is a priority for health care practitioners. This new session will introduce the high quality resources available to you as well as provide training in how to use them effectively to support evidence-based clinical practice or decision-making.
Recommended for: NHS staff

Thurs 20th July 15.00 – 17.00
Thurs 24th August 15.00 – 17.00
Tues 12th September 10.00 – 12.00

*New*  Twitter for Promotions

You will learn how to use Twitter for promotional purposes, find out about useful Twitter functions and tools such as Hootsuite and Storify.
Recommended for: Useful for anyone involved in a team or department Twitter account, or thinking of creating one.
Requirements: Users should be familiar with Twitter, as there will be a hands on element to the session.

Tues 15th August 12.00 -13.30

Introduction to critical appraisal
Thurs 27th July 15.00-16.30

Systematic Reviews – Finding and managing the evidence
Weds 19th July 13.00 -16.00
Weds 23rd August 10.00-13.00
Tues 19th September 13.00- 16.00

Getting Started with Twitter
Mon 31st July 12.00 – 13.30

Library Inductions for NHS Staff

Thurs 20th July 10.00 – 11.00
Thurs 17th August 10.00 – 11.00
Thurs 21st September 10.00 – 11.00

Personalised training

If you cannot make any of the times, we are happy to arrange sessions for either individual or larger groups depending on your needs. To organise a bespoke session please email us at liaison@sgul.ac.uk

The Dissection of an Egyptian Mummy at St George’s Hospital Medical School

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Our Archivist Carly Manson has been looking more in depth into the history of St George’s. One of the interesting stories that you may not know about, is that the med school once dissected a mummy!


 

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1835 saw the opening ceremony of St George’s Hospital Medical School. It also saw the opening of an ancient Egyptian mummy, in the hopes of impressing an expectant crowd.

Physicians and surgeons were permitted to have a limited number of pupils in the early days of St George’s Hospital, but there was no established medical school. Students would travel to various places for the different studies needed in their professional education.  A medical school was eventually formed in 1831, and established on Kinnerton Street in 1834, a few minutes walk from the hospital at Hyde Park Corner in central London.

According to The Lancet, one of the world’s oldest general medical journals, there was an official opening of the St George’s Hospital Medical School at Kinnerton Street in July 1835. To attract visitors to the opening, it was advertised that an Egyptian mummy was to be dissected in front of the audience in the new Anatomical Theatre.

The mummy was said to have been a high ranking lady who belonged to the Temple of Ammon in Thebes.  Its exterior casing was ornate and varnished black, while the inner casing was made of sycamore wood covered with hieroglyphics which acknowledged the Egyptian deities.

It was announced that the mummy had been gifted to the school by the high ranking Lord Frederick Fitzclarence. But according to the ‘intercepted letters’ section of The Lancet article, a Mr Turner stated that the mummy was actually an old present to Mr Robert Keate, the hospital Surgeon:

“You would notice in your card of invitation, that the mummy was presented to the school by no less than Sir Frederick Fitzclarence, but on inquiring I found that, like Brodie’s other trickeries, it had not been presented to the school at all, but that Lord Fitz had given it to Bobby Keate ages ago.” (Wakley, 1835)

Unfortunately, The Lancet goes on to state that “the mummy gave more than the usual trouble to Mr P. and his assistants, and, after all, presented nothing singular to gratify the eye or the curiosity…. All appearance of flesh was destroyed, and the corpse looked like a skeleton dipped in pitch.” (Wakley, 1835)

Not everyone was disappointed by the event, The Lancet cites Mr Turner as stating “I do not regret going, as it turned out to be a fine intellectual comedy” (Wakley, 1835).  Despite the Lancet’s somewhat negative article, news spread of the opening, and the American Railroad Journal acclaimed that “much curiosity has been excited in the scientific world by the opening of a mummy”. (Minor, 1835)

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Prospectus for a course of lectures on anatomy at the St George’s Hospital Medical School at Kinnerton Street for 1837-1838

For further information relating to the history of St George’s Hospital and the medical school, please contact the Archivist at archives@sgul.ac.uk or go to the following webpage: http://library.sgul.ac.uk/using-the-library/archives

Did you know…

The word ‘dissection’ originates from the Latin ‘dissecare’, meaning ‘to cut to pieces’. Dissection, also known as ‘anatomisation’, has been used for centuries to explore the body of a deceased animal or plant to study its internal structures and functions. Dissection is still practised in medical schools worldwide, although computer models are also increasingly used to teach anatomy. One resource that St George’s Library currently subscribes to is Acland’s Anatomy, an accessible online tool with realistic 3D visuals.


Reference list

Wakley, T. (ed.) (July 1835), ‘Kinnerton Street School’, The Lancet, vol. II, pp.457-463

Minor, D.K. (ed.) (August 1835) The American Railroad Journal, and Advocate of Internal Improvements, Vol 4. no 33, pp.526

 

Hot off the press: My Name is Leon by Kit De Waal

Pick up your own free copy of My Name is Leon today!

This special edition is published as part of the KU Big Read and includes comments about last year’s Big Read and discussion prompts to help you join in the conversation.

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New students starting at Kingston University London this year will receive a copy over the summer, including FHSCE students studying at the joint faculty of Kingston and St George’s, to welcome them to University life. Current students and staff can grab the book for themselves from the library helpdesk at St George’s.

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You can read our staff and student reviews of all of the shortlisted Big Read titles, including Senior Lecturer Joanne Powell’s review of My Name is Leon, by clicking on The Big Read tag.

Author visit to St George’s

Kit De Waal’s first novel has become an award winning best seller and was shortlisted for the 2016 Costa First Novel Award. Lenny Henry, after narrating an audiobook version, has optioned the book for TV, so we’re sure there will be big and exciting things still to come for this wonderful book.

Speaking of exciting news soon to come – Kit De Waal will be visiting St George’s in October. It will be a great opportunity to hear her speak about her book and maybe even get your own copy signed!

Further details will be annouced on the KU Big Read website, or watch this space…

Lunchtime book club

There will be a one-off lunchtime book club in August for staff to discuss the themes in My Name is Leon. Please contact St George’s Library if you’re interested in joining.


Join the discussion. Tell us what you thought of My Name is Leon, or what your favourite Big Read shortlisted book is. Come by the library to borrow a copy.

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26 June – Book swap and new book display

Book Swap

From Monday 26th June – Friday 7th July, we’re putting out a book swap trolley in the Library Foyer. All St George’s staff and student are welcome to pick a book to read for free (initial collection kindly donated by Library staff) and to drop off a book on the trolley for sharing with others.

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Our Summer  2016 book swap trolley.  Pick up a book, drop off a book!

Summer Remix – best of the book displays  2016-2017

Watch out for our new book display in the Library that will go out on Monday 26th June. We’re putting out the most popular books from the displays that we’ve run for this academic year, which includes a selection of fiction and non-fictional titles.

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Holiday Checklist

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Wherever you’re going to be over the summer, our online resources and other services can help you keep studying. Here are three quick steps to consider before you leave SGUL to make this as straightforward as possible.

  1. Reset your SGUL password
  2. Bring books to the library to renew
  3. Register to study in a library near you

1. Reset your SGUL password

With your SGUL login and password, you can use our journals and e-books, and online resources such as Acland’s Anatomy from anywhere with internet access.

We recommend you reset your password before you leave as this ensures you won’t need to change it again for 3 months.

If your password expires or you’ve forgotten your password, you can usually reset it from offsite. Note: you must have already set up an external email address and if you don’t receive the reset link, check your junk mail folder.

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For a refresher on finding online resources, have a look at our Hunter FAQs.
We also have step by step guide to accessing e-resources from offsite [PDF].

2. Bring books to the Library to renew

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Return and reissue your books to extend your renewal limit

If you’re borrowing items over the summer, it’s a good idea to bring them into the Library so you can return and reissue them on our self-service machines.

Once you’ve done this, you’ll be able to renew any unreserved items a further 10 times online by logging into your library account.  This requires entering the 10-digit number under the barcode on your SGUL card, so you may want to note this number down before you go away.

3. Register to study in a library near you

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SGUL Library is a member of the SCONUL scheme, which allows our users reference access to around 170 other university libraries across the UK and Ireland. Postgraduates may also get limited borrowing rights in some cases.

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To use the scheme,  follow the steps on the SCONUL Access page. Within a few days, and provided there are no fines on your Library account, you’ll receive an email from us which you can take to your chosen library along with your SGUL ID card to apply for access.

Like SGUL, many academic institutions in the UK and worldwide use Eduroam for WiFi. If  you are near a university and have WiFi enabled on phone or laptop, you should immediately pick up the network. If you are using Eduroam for the first  time, remember to enter your full SGUL username (including @sgul.ac.uk) and password.

Finally, if you’re staying a bit closer to St George’s over the summer, our Summer Sites blog series has information about medical and other libraries you can visit in London, as well as some nearby attractions. Note: double check with the libraries for their opening hours before visiting.

Our website library.sgul.ac.uk is a great jumping off point for accessing the services and resources mentioned in this post.