Now available: BMJ Learning

St George’s University students

Great news – the University has decided to get access to all BMJ Learning modules for students. You can now work your way through hundreds of accredited, peer-reviewed modules in text, video and audio formats.

To access BMJ Learning you will need to sign in with or register for a BMJ personal account. Once you are logged in, select ‘Shibboleth access’ on the drop down list from the ‘My Account’ menu. You will have full access to the BMJ Learning resources with your university username and password. Returning users who have completed the step above to link their account with the SGUL subscription can login with their personal account directly. If you have any questions around this, don’t hesitate to email liaison@sgul.ac.uk.

The courses include a range of modules, covering different topics. There are specific courses for fast-tracked students to get training on clinical skills and Covid-19 treatment. Learn for example about basic life support, basic practical skills and fluid management in acutely ill patients.

Examples of modules included in the fast-tracked students course

The regular courses on offer are divided into specialties such as diabetes and endocrinology, gastroenterology, neurology, oncology, paediatrics, practical skills, respiratory and ENT, rheumatology, sexual and reproductive health.

BMJ Learning specialties

NHS staff

In light of the current ongoing Coronavirus Covid-19 crisis, BMJ Learning have made some of their online courses available for free temporarily to NHS staff. Access them here – https://new-learning.bmj.com/covid-19

NHS staff will find the following courses particularly useful:

  • Covid-19 treatment
  • Return to Practice
  • Well being

NHS staff who are returning to work or working on the frontline with Covid-19 patients will find the modules on treatment and clinical skills refreshers useful.

Example of a module within the Return to Practice course

The Well being course covers a range of topics around your professional practice, such as emotional intelligence and dealing with conflict, but also focuses on understanding patient consent and treatment risk calculations.

All you need to access the content is sign up for a free account, which you can do here.

BMJ Best Practice App Update

The BMJ have changed the login page for the Best Practice App where it now asks for an ‘Institutional No’. This is an alternative way to log in which St George’s, University of London does not use. Please ignore this and log in to the app using your username and password as usual.

BMJ Best Practice app is available for  iPhone, iPods and iPads.

For more information about the app  please see our Feature review on the Mobile resources blog