Placing Holds: a quick guide

Place Holds new logo

Books that are out on loan can be reserved in a few quick steps using the Library’s search tool, Hunter.

After finding the book you want, select Check availability of print copies to find out whether it’s available:

new check availability box

If all copies are out on loan, you’ll be able to reserve a copy. Just follow the three steps below:

no 1 fadeIf you haven’t already, sign in to Hunter.

1 sign in cut

  • SGUL staff and students can sign in with their SGUL username and password
  • NHS staff can find out their Hunter login by asking at the Library helpdesk or emailing library@sgul.ac.uk

no 2 fadeAfter you sign in, a Place hold option appears. Click here…

2 place hold cut

no 3 fade…and select Request

3 select request

Hunter confirms that your hold is placed:

new confirmation

When a copy of the book becomes available you’ll receive an email, and will then have one week to collect it from the Library Helpdesk.

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International Women’s Day 2019

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Happy International Women’s Day!

There’s plenty of superb female writing talent in the Library, from our own St George’s academics, to classic and contemporary fiction writers. As we were celebrating reading for pleasure during World Book Day yesterday, we thought we’d mark #IWD2019 by pulling together a selection of female-authored fiction titles available in the Library.

You can find these and the rest of our fiction on the shelves at PN3353, but if you’d like to browse them online, click the image below. Each item is linked to its Hunter record, so you can check to see whether a copy is available to borrow. If it’s on loan, remember you can place a hold by signing in to Hunter:

Written by Women.png

 

International Women’s Day is all about celebrating women’s achievements, so there’s no better day to mark the accomplishments of our first four female medical students. Admitted in 1915 due to a shortage of men during the First World War, two of them are pictured below. Helen Ingleby (L) & Hetty Ethelberta Claremont (R) went on to have successful careers in the medical profession.

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You can read more about ‘The First Women of St George’s’ in this interactive timeline. Click the image below for more details, or read our profile of pioneering female medics during the First World War.

WomenMedicinePrezi

Festive reading from St George’s Library

Library staff have been busy searching Hunter this week to find some scientific (and not-so-scientific) festive reading for you, all in the name of spreading some good cheer. Have a look at our highlights below – we’ve linked to the Hunter record or full-text where possible.


Have you ever wondered why Rudolph’s nose is red? This intriguing observational study from 2012 sheds some light on the matter:

Rudolph - BMJ

Intrigued by the occupational health hazards that Father Christmas might experience in his very unique role? This commentary explores some of the issues and recommends a comprehensive workplace occupational health program for the man himself:

Santa - Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology

That isn’t the only paper that is concerned with Father Christmas’ calorie consumption. The authors below present some quite worrying calculations:

Santa Calories.png

Other researchers have concentrated their efforts on debunking the ‘naughty or nice’ myth, concluding that there are a number of socioeconomic reasons why Santa is, unfortunately, less likely to visit children in hospital. This is thankfully counterbalanced by the wonderful work NHS staff do to make the festive period special for their patients:

Father Christmas - BMJ.png

This next paper demonstrates that decorating your Christmas tree might not be such a festive activity if you have a colophonium allergy:

Christmas Tree - Contact Dermatitis.png

Finally, if you aren’t a Brussels sprouts fan, but feel duty-bound to eat some over the holidays, you might be pleased to hear that a nice glass of tannin-rich Cabernet Sauvignon might help improve the taste:

Brussels Sprouts - Journal of Texture Studies

 

Happy reading!

 

References:

Carpenter, G. et al. (2018) ‘Wine astringency reduces flavour intensity of Brussels sprouts’. To be published in Journal of Texture Studies [Preprint]. Available at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jtxs.12378 (Accessed: 18 December 2018).

Gether, L., Gyldenløve, M. and Thyssen, J.P. (2017) ‘Christmas tree dermatitis caused by colophonium allergy’, Contact Dermatitis, 77(6), pp. 412-414. Available at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/cod.12798 (Accessed: 18 December 2018).

Ince, C. et al. (2012) ‘Why Rudolph’s nose is red: observational study’, BMJ, 345:e8311, pp. 1-6. Available at: https://www.bmj.com/content/bmj/345/bmj.e8311.full.pdf (Accessed: 18 December 2018).

Park, J.J. et al. (2016) ‘Dispelling the nice or naughty myth: retrospective observational study of Santa Claus’, BMJ, 355:i6355, pp. 1-5. Available at: https://www.bmj.com/content/bmj/355/bmj.i6355.full.pdf (Accessed: 18 December 2018).

Straube, S. and Fan, X. (2015) ‘The occupational health of Santa Claus’, Journal of Occupational Health and Toxicology, 10(44), pp. 1-3. Available: https://occup-med.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12995-015-0086-1 (Accessed: 18 December 2018).

Wormser, G.P. and Ladenheim, A. (2018) ‘How many calories did Santa Claus consume on Christmas Eve?’, Wiener klinische Wochenschrift, 130(1-2), pp. 73-75. Available at: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00508-017-1306-8 (Accessed: 18 December 2018).

September Update

Whether you’re back in Tooting or still a little further afield, the Library has a range of help and resources that you can connect to from (almost) anywhere, helping you get a headstart on your studies for the new semester.

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Access online resources with your SGUL login

Hunter Transparent 1384 x 281

Use the new-look Hunter to search for e-books and online journal articles that you can access from anywhere with an internet connection.

  • To find e-books, drop down to ‘Books and more’ before you search, then use the filter options to narrow your results to Online Resources.

E-book search

  • Search in ‘Articles and more’ to find online journal articles and similar material.

To open the full e-book or article, follow the links under ‘View Online’ and enter your SGUL login and password. You can find more help in our PDF guide to accessing e-resources from offsite.

For more advice about finding resources in Hunter, see the Hunter FAQs.


More online resources, including Acland’s Video Atlas of Human Anatomy, BMJ Best Practice and DynaMed Plus, can be found in the Databases A-Z.

  • Find a resource in the A-Z list then follow the link for offsite access
  • Enter your SGUL login and password to access

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Find more information about online resources and apps in the Useful Apps section of our Library Essentials LibGuide.

Forgotten/Expired password?

Use this link to reset it from offsite.

Note: you must have already set up an external email address and if you don’t receive a reset email, check your junk mail folder.


Contact the Library for help

The Library remains open 7 days a week, with 24 hour opening returning from Monday 17th September.

The Library Helpdesk is staffed as usual from 8am to 6pm every weekday. Call in and see us, or phone us on 020 8725 5466.

Helpdesk iconRED icon

The Research Enquiries Desk can help with more in-depth queries about finding resources, referencing and more. Drop in or phone 020 8725 5514 during the RED’s staffed hours (see below).

Alternatively, email a query to liaison@sgul.ac.uk and a liaison librarian will get back to you.

Summer From Sep 17th
Library Opening Hours Mon to Fri: 8am – 11pm

Sat and Sun: 9am – 9pm

24 hours

Library Helpdesk staffed Mon to Fri: 8am – 6pm Mon to Fri: 8am – 6pm
Research Enquiries Desk staffed Mon to Fri: 12pm – 2pm* Mon to Fri: 11am – 2pm* from Sep 11th

*subject to change

Find more information about these and other services – including support with IT and academic writing – in the Getting help section of our Library Essentials LibGuide.

Hunter’s New Look

paint splash Hunter's NEW LOOK - twitter

Hunter has had a makeover for the new term. While the search tool’s features remain the same, it has a fresh new look which will change the way you use and navigate Hunter. Read this blog post for a quick guide to some of the cosmetic changes that have been made to Hunter’s interface, or see our Hunter FAQs for further guidance.

Homepage
Searching
Viewing item records
Using ‘My Account’
Using your eShelf

 

Homepage

Hunter’s new homepage has a clean design with a search bar for all of our resources embedded in the centre of the page. The homepage header provides links to your account, interlibrary loans, databases and more. You can sign in on the top right hand corner for full functionality.

homepage

You’ll find links to our social media accounts and library blog along the bottom of the page. You can like or follow our accounts to keep up-to-date with the library.

 

Searching

Hunter’s search ‘widget’ has had a facelift and is now a deep blue instead of orange – you will find this embedded on the Library website and in our LibGuides. It will continue to perform the same search functions as before. You are still encouraged to select the category that you would like to search from the drop down list. You should then type in some keywords from your search topic and select ‘Search’ to view your search results.

hunter widget

Viewing item records

After performing a search you will see a list of search results displayed on your device. You can click on each individual result to view the item record which will appear in a pop-up window.  This will include information on full text and borrowing availability and you will be encouraged to sign-in to your account for full functionality. The slideshow below shows some examples of what a book, article and journal record look like in this updated version of Hunter:

 

 

 

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Using ‘My Account’

By signing-in to Hunter in the top-right hand side of the page, you will be able to view detailed information on your borrowing history, current loans, fines and hold requests. The overview section offers a quick snapshot of your account but the following tabs offer more detail about your Library record:

Loans: This tab will show you a list of items you currently have on loan and their due dates. You can also change the drop-down arrow to view your previous borrowing history.

Requests: This tab will highlight any items on which you have placed a hold. Click this tab to check your place in the queue, or cancel your request if you no longer need the book.

Fine + Fees: This tab will include the details of any fines or fees associated with your record. These might include fines for overdue items, or invoice and administration fees for lost or damaged books.

 

 

 

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Using your eShelf

eshelf pin

Your eShelf will remain active and any items that you have previously added will automatically be transferred over to the new Hunter interface. The eShelf has a new icon, the pin graphic, which you can select to add items you want to save. The pin icon in the top right hand side of the page will take you to your eShelf.

The different tabs within your eShelf will allow you to view your save records as well as any previous searches you have saved. If you have lost track of your searches in a particular browsing session, you can view your search history for a reminder. More detailed guidance on adding, managing and removing items/searches from your eShelf will be published shortly.

 

 

 

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We hope you’ll agree that the new interface looks and feel more modern and offers a more intuitive search experience. Further guidance is available in the Hunter FAQs on the library website. If you have any questions about Hunter, you can email us at liaison@sgul.ac.uk or a member of Helpdesk staff will be happy help anytime during staffed hours (Mon-Fri 8am – 6pm)

Coming soon: a new look for Hunter

Hunter Transparent 1384 x 281

Back in December 2017 we launched our new library management system and an upgraded version of Hunter. Since then, library staff have been busy behind the scenes delivering more improvements to our search tool.

Hunter’s last upgrade saw a number of changes, including automatic renewals and more detailed item availability, but the interface largely remained the same. This time,  familiar Hunter features will remain, including your e-Shelf and Library account, but the look and feel of Hunter will be quite different.

‘New look’ Hunter will be going live on Friday 3rd August 2018. Here’s a sneak peak of what you can expect…

Rest assured, library staff will be on hand to help you get used to the new look and we’ll be providing updated, detailed guidance on using Hunter in due course. Keep an eye out for further blog posts or contact us at liaison@sgul.ac.uk if you have any questions.

 

 

Quick Guide to Placing Holds

holds cover hunter

 

 

 

 

It’s now easier than ever to reserve a book that’s out on loan using the Library’s search tool, Hunter.

First check the Locations tab to find out whether the book you want is available. If all copies are out on loan, you’ll be able to reserve a copy. Just follow the three steps below:

no 1 fadeIf you haven’t already, sign in to Hunter.

  • SGUL staff and students can sign in with their SGUL username and password
  • NHS staff can find out their Hunter login (which is different from the Library username and password) by asking at the Library Helpdesk or emailing library@sgul.ac.uk

Hunter 1

no 2 fadeAfter you sign in, a Place hold option appears. Click here…

Hunter 2 full

no 3 fade…and select Request.

Hunter 3 option b

Hold placed

 

Hunter confirms that your hold is placed.

When a copy of the book becomes available you’ll receive an email, and will then have one week to collect it from the Library Helpdesk.