Applying the Skills: Literature Searching e-learning final module now available

How to Search the Literature Effectively_Banner.

The final module, How to Search the Healthcare Databases, of the seven module How to Search the Literature Effectively programme has now been published. The programme aims to help health and social care professionals develop confidence in searching for and identifying relevant articles in support of work, study and research.

Each modules features a mix of explanatory material, video demonstrations and opportunities to ‘check understanding’ via practice search screens.

Module 1 Introduction to searching
Module 2 Where do I start searching?
Module 3 How do I start to develop a search strategy?
Module 4 Too many results? How to narrow your search
Module 5 Too few results? How to broaden your search
Module 6 Searching with subject headings
Module 7 How to search the Healthcare Databases (HDAS)

See our blog post New NHS e-learning programme on literature searching now available for an overview of the programme.

Module seven pulls together skills learnt from the earlier modules and encourages users to apply that learning when using the Healthcare Databases Advanced Search (HDAS). The module can be completed as a part of the whole programme, or as a standalone module for users already familiar with literature searching but who would like to try searching the Healthcare Databases for the first time or need to refresh their skills.

All modules are freely available and can be accessed without the need to login on the eLearning for Healthcare web site https://www.e-lfh.org.uk/programmes/literature-searching/. If you wish to record and save your learning you will need to login via NHS OpenAthens.

The Future of Thinking: Learning Institutions in a Digital Age

Authors: Cathy N. Davidson and David Theo Goldberg, with Zoë Marie Jones. Published by MIT Press, March 2010. From their website:
“Over the past two decades, the way we learn has changed dramatically. We have new sources of information and new ways to exchange and to interact with information. But our schools and the way we teach have remained largely the same for years, even centuries. What happens to traditional educational institutions when learning also takes place on a vast range of Internet sites, from Pokemon Web pages to Wikipedia? This report investigates how traditional learning institutions can become as innovative, flexible, robust, and collaborative as the best social networking sites. The authors propose an alternative definition of “institution” as a “mobilizing network”—emphasizing its flexibility, the permeability of its boundaries, its interactive productivity, and its potential as a catalyst for change—and explore the implications for higher education.

The Future of Thinking reports on innovative, virtual institutions. It also uses the idea of a virtual institution both as part of its subject matter and as part of its process: the first draft was hosted on a Web site for collaborative feedback and writing. The authors use this experiment in participatory writing as a test case for virtual institutions, learning institutions, and a new form of collaborative authorship. The finished version is still posted and open for comment. This book is the full-length report of the project, which was summarized in an earlier MacArthur volume, The Future of Learning Institutions in a Digital Age.

The book is also freely available as a download under a creative commons licence.

Enhancing learning through technology – publication from HEA & JISC

As part of the  Higher Education Academy and JISC Collaboration Initiative launched in 2005, a report entitled “Enhancing learning through technology” was published in Oct 2009. It is a very useful summary  of some of the resources produced in the period 2007 – 2009 for enhancing learning and teaching through technology that are provided by the organisations and agencies that make up the Collaboration Network.

2009 Horizon report highlights likely impact of emerging technologies in HE

From their website http://connect.educause.edu/:

“The annual Horizon Report is a collaborative effort between the New Media Consortium (NMC) and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI). Each year, the report identifies and describes six areas of emerging technology likely to have a significant impact on teaching, learning, or creative expression in higher education within three adoption horizons: a year or less, two to three years, and four to five years.
The areas of emerging technology cited for 2009 are:
• Mobiles (i.e., mobile devices)
• Cloud computing
• Geo-everything (i.e., geo-tagging)
• The personal web
• Semantic-aware applications
• Smart objects
Each section of the report provides live Web links to examples and additional readings. An executive summary is also provided. The report can be downloaded here:
http://connect.educause.edu/Library/ELI/2009HorizonReport/48003