Preprints in the biological, medical and health sciences: some questions answered.

The open research movement is about disseminating scientific outputs widely and openly as soon as possible. One of the ways that researchers can rapidly share their work with a wide audience is by posting a preprint to a preprint server. The practice of sharing and commenting on preprints has recently been described as ‘science in real time1

What is a preprint?
Why post preprints online?
Before you post your preprint, what should you consider?
Where can I post preprints?
Where are preprints indexed?
How do I find out about preprints?
Can SGUL researchers record and deposit preprints in CRIS/SORA/SGUL Data Repository?
The future of preprints
Queries about preprints or open research?
References

What is a preprint?

The preprint is the original version of your work, before peer review and before acceptance by a journal.

Why post preprints online?

  • Publishing your research as a preprint means that you can get your work out fast. From 2021, the Wellcome Trust2 will require that any research they fund that is relevant to a public health emergency be published as a preprint, in order to disseminate findings on such important areas as quickly as possible3,4.
  • Your work will be citeable and shareable as soon as it’s posted, allowing you to demonstrate the work you’re doing to funders, colleagues and potential collaborators.
  • Immediate feedback from your peers can help you improve your manuscript, as well as opening up potential avenues for follow up work or collaborations.
  • By publishing your findings as a preprint, you can publically establish priority by date stamping your findings and making your preprint part of the scientific record.
  • Preprint servers (examples below) allow for disseminating hard-to-publish but important work such as negative/null findings.
  • In fields where posting preprints to preprint servers is commonplace, these can become a one stop shop for getting a quick overview of the newest developments in the field – a piece in Nature5 highlights how biorXiv can be used to help researchers stay abreast of what their colleagues are working on.

Before you post your preprint, what should you consider?

If you are posting as a step prior to publishing in a journal, check whether your prospective journal has any rules around preprints – do they consider posting preprints as ‘prior publication’?

What’s the best platform for what you want to achieve? If you want feedback on your paper from a specific group before going more public, you could share it on St George’s data repository via a closed group or a private link.

Are there charges for posting? Where there are charges, these tend to be much less than open access fees in more established journals, however you will still need to consider how these are paid.

Where can I post preprints?

bioRxiv.org is a preprint server for the biological sciences. Many journals allow you to submit work that has been previously published as a preprint, and preprints posted to bioRxiv can also be directly transferred for submission to a variety of other peer review services (eg Plos, BMC). An analysis6 earlier this year of biorXiv preprints found that “two-thirds of preprints posted before 2017 were later published in peer-reviewed journals”.

medRxiv is a preprint server using the same software as bioRxiv, and papers on health sciences topics can be posted there.

BioMed Central have recently launched a new prepublication option, In Review, for articles under consideration in four of their journals: BMC Anesthesiology, BMC Neurology, BMC Ophthalmology and Trials.

F1000 Research, Wellcome Open Research and the new AMRC Open Research operate under a slightly different model: preprints posted to these sites are then openly peer reviewed, and the article is considered published once it has passed peer review. 

All these sites screen contributions for plagiarism and appropriateness, and to ensure they meet ethical standards.

Where are preprints indexed?

bioRxiv and medRxiv preprints are indexed by Google, Google Scholar, CrossRef and other search tools. They are not indexed by Web of Science, however they will be indexed in EPMC as follows:

“To distinguish preprints from peer reviewed articles in Europe PMC, each preprint is given a PPR ID, and is clearly labelled as a preprint, both on the abstract view and the search results… When preprints have subsequently been published as peer-reviewed articles and indexed in Europe PMC they are crosslinked to each other.”

Preprints are not indexed in PubMed until they have achieved sufficient peer review.

How do I find out about preprints?

Preprint platforms have options to set up alerts for subject categories, recent additions and to track papers when they are revised.

Rxivist combines preprints from bioRxiv with data from Twitter to help find the papers being discussed in a particular field, to help researchers deal with the “avalanche” of research7 they may be faced with. 

I’m a SGUL researcher, can I record and deposit my preprints in SGUL’s CRIS (Current Research Information System), St George’s Research Data Repository or publications repository, SORA (St George’s Online Research Archive)?

Records for preprints can come into your CRIS profile from CrossREF & EPMC. This is useful as it adds to the completeness of your publication list in CRIS.

As and when a paper from biorXiv or medrXiv goes onto to be published in a journal, then we’d expect to see a record for this in CRIS too.

For the purposes of making full text available via SORA, we have historically only made those versions of an article post peer review (either the final accepted MS or publisher version where possible) publically available.

For REF 2021, while preprints will be eligible for submission8, only outputs which have been ‘accepted for publication’ (such as a journal article or conference contribution with an ISSN) are within the scope of the REF 2021 open access policy. SGUL researchers should continue to follow the deposit on acceptance advice and upload the accepted version of their papers to CRIS for SORA.

The future of preprints

While there has been debate on the pros and cons of preprints in terms of whether research disseminated in this way will advance healthcare for patients9, improvements to preprint platforms (such as medRxiv’s cautionary advice to news media on their homepage) and backing by funders should mean that as a tool for researchers to quickly share & find preliminary findings, preprints will be around for the foreseeable future.

As funder mandates and preprint practices develop in the medical and health sciences, we will keep our system capabilities for capturing and promoting researchers’ preprints under active review.

Queries about preprints or open research?

Contact us

CRIS & Deposit on acceptance: sora@sgul.ac.uk

Open Access Publications: openaccess@sgul.ac.uk

Research Data Management: researchdata@sgul.ac.uk

We look forward to hearing from you.

Michelle Harricharan, Research Data Support Manager
Jenni Hughes, Research Publications Assistant
Jennifer Smith, Research Publications Librarian

Look out for a Library blog post on open peer review during Peer Review Week which is taking place September 16-20 2019.

If you are interested receiving updates from the Library on all things open access, open data and scholarly research communications, you can subscribe to the Library Blog using the Follow button or click here for further posts from us.

References

1. Knowledge Exchange. Preprints: Science in real time [Internet]. Bristol: Knowledge Exchange; 2018 [cited 2019 Aug 7]. Available from: http://www.knowledge-exchange.info/event/preprints.

See also the slide deck:

Chiarelli, A; Johnson, R; Pinfield, S; Richens, E. Practices, drivers and impediments in the use of preprints: Phase 1 report [Internet]. 2019 [cited 2019 Aug 8]. Available from: http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.2654832

2. Wellcome Trust. Open Access Policy 2021 [Internet]. London: Wellcome; 2019 [cited 2019 Aug 8]. Available from: https://wellcome.ac.uk/sites/default/files/wellcome-open-access-policy-2021.pdf

3. Peiperl L. Preprints in medical research: Progress and principles. PLoS Med [Internet]. 2018 [cited 2019 Aug 8];15(4):e1002563. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1002563

4. Johansson MA, Reich NG, Meyers LA, Lipsitch M. Preprints: An underutilized mechanism to accelerate outbreak science. PLoS Med [Internet]. 2018 [cited 2019 Aug 8];15(4):e1002549. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1002549

5. Learn, JR. What bioRxiv’s first 30,000 preprints reveal about biologists [Internet]. 2019 [cited 2019 Aug 8]. Available from: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-00199-6

6. Abdill, RJ, Blekhman, R. Tracking the popularity and outcomes of all bioRxiv preprints. bioRxiv [Internet]. 2019 [cited 2019 Aug 7];515643. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1101/515643

7. Abdill, RJ; Blekhman R. Rxivist.org: Sorting biology preprints using social media and readership metrics. PLOS Biol [Internet]. 2019 [cited 2019 Aug 8];17(5):e3000269. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.3000269

8. REF 2021. Guidance on submissions (2019/01) Section 238. [Internet]. 2019 [cited 2019 Aug 7]. Available from: https://www.ref.ac.uk/publications/guidance-on-submissions-201901/

9. Krumholz HM, Ross JS, Otto CM. Will research preprints improve healthcare for patients? BMJ [Internet]. 2018 [cited 2019 Aug 8];362:k3628. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.k3628

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A year’s worth of Open Research and SGUL

A year's worth of Open Research and SGULIf you are a researcher at SGUL, we are here to help you share and preserve your data, and publish in a way that meets your funder open access mandates, as many have a commitment to making data and publications as openly available as possible.

SGUL has two repositories to enable researchers to share and preserve both data and publications: read on for more facts and figures about how adding your work to these ties in with our Strategic Plan to maximise the impact of our research.

Research Data

In late 2017 the Research Data Management Service announced our pilot Research Data Repository. In 2018 we published more than 20 outputs to the repository including the official proceedings from SGUL’s Education Day (2017), presentations from Infection and Immunity’s annual INTERTB symposium, and, to mark World AIDS Day this December, the Centre for Global Health released the first of six free training modules to share SGUL expertise on treating one of the biggest causes of HIV-related mortality in Africa. Our work has been viewed, downloaded and shared locally and internationally.

Contact the Research Data Management Service to talk about sharing your data, powerpoint presentations, posters and videos on the repository.

This year also saw the introduction of new Europe-wide data protection legislation. How could we forget that? Our team worked closely with colleagues across St George’s and external organisations to support our researchers in the run-up to 25 May. Our GDPR and Health Research blog post was part of that awareness raising campaign.

In 2018 SGUL’s Information Management (IM) Team was also formed. Made up of our Information Governance Manager, Data Protection Officer, Freedom of Information Officer, Archivist, Records Manager and Research Data Manager, the IM Team looks to streamline information flows across St George’s and raise awareness of information policies and good practice. We run regular seminars on IM.

Contact our Records Manager for more information.

 

384px-Open_Access_logo_PLoS_transparent.svgOpen Access publications

On the publications front, the number of articles now free to read via SORA (St George’s Online Research Archive) has been steadily increasing, driven by the open access mandate for the 2021 REF (for more on this, see our webpages).   We now have nearly 3000 articles publicly accessible via SORA with more being added all the time. Downloads of the articles is also rising; up to 2,300+ downloads per month on average in 2018 (from 1,800+ downloads per month on average in 2017). As with data, the articles have a global reach, being downloaded by readers in all parts of the world.

Records are included in the open access aggregation platform CORE, which contains over 11 million full-text articles.  CORE is working with trusted parties such as institutional and subject repositories and journals (other sources of articles such as SciHub1 and Research Gate2 have been subject to action by publishers due to copyright infringement). CORE also allows for text mining of the corpus.

This year we also upgraded our CRIS (Current Research Information System). Among other improvements, if you confirm your ORCiD in your CRIS profile, any publications matched in our data sources with your ORCiD will be automatically claimed for you. For more on ORCiDs and the benefits of having one, see our blogpost from earlier this year.

Contact us at sora@sgul.ac.uk if you would like guidance on keeping your CRIS publication lists & metrics up to date.

 

Funder initiatives

Funder mandates and publisher policies around open access to research are an area of constant evolution. This year has seen the announcement of Wellcome Trust’s plans to update their open access policy for 2020, to ensure all Wellcome-funded research articles are made freely available at the time of publication, and Plan S, which aims to require all research articles funded by the coalition of research funding organisations behind the plan be published in open access journals, or on open access platforms.

Plan S has certainly caught the attention of publishers – for example it has been welcomed with caveats by the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers3, and Nature recently reported it has support in China4

SGUL researchers have benefited from negotiations by Jisc Collections5 with publishers around subscriptions and open access charges; for instance in being able to publish open access for free under the Springer Open Choice agreement.

Contact us via openaccess@sgul.ac.uk if you have any questions about how to meet your funder open access policies.

 

Lastly, special thanks to all of our researchers who have answered our calls to be involved with open research.

In particular, to the laboratory researchers who opened up their groups, projects and labs to us earlier this year and told us all about their data and records management practices. We have now produced a report on our findings and will be building on this work in the New Year.

And to all who have been making their papers open access, as we work towards the next REF.

We hope to see or hear from you in 2019

Michelle Harricharan, Research Data Support Manager
Jenni Hughes, Research Publications Assistant
Jennifer Smith, Research Publications Librarian

 

Contacts

CRIS & Deposit on acceptance: sora@sgul.ac.uk

Open Access Publications: openaccess@sgul.ac.uk

Research Data Management: researchdata@sgul.ac.uk

 

References

1. Page, B. Publishers succeed in getting Sci-Hub access blocked in Russia. The Bookseller [Internet]. 2018 Dec 11 [cited 2018 Dec 13]. Available from: https://www.thebookseller.com/news/sci-hub-blocked-russia-following-court-action-publishers-911571

2. McKenzie, L. Publishers escalate legal battle against ResearchGate. Inside Higher Ed [Internet]. 2018 Oct 4 [cited 2018 Dec 13]. Available from: https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2018/10/04/publishers-accuse-researchgate-mass-copyright-infringement

3. STM. STM statement on Plan S: Accelerating the transition to full and immediate Open Access to scientific publications [Internet]. The Hague: International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers; 2018 [cited 2018 Dec 13]. Available from: https://www.stm-assoc.org/2018_09_04_STM_Statement_on_PlanS.pdf

4. Schiermeier Q. China backs bold plan to tear down journal paywalls. Nature [Internet]. 2018 Dec 13 [cited 2018 Dec 14]. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/d41586-018-07659-5

5. Earney, L. National licence negotiations advancing the open access transition – a view from the UK. Insights [Internet]. 2018 [cited 2018 Dec 14]; 31 (11). Available from: http://doi.org/10.1629/uksg.412

 


If you are interested receiving updates from the Library on all things open access, open data and scholarly research communications, you can subscribe to the Library Blog using the Follow button or click here for further posts from us.

Open Access Week 2018: Medical charities collaborate further to ensure results are shared.

OA Week 2018 Banner Website

As the theme of 2018 International Open Access Week  “Designing Equitable Foundations for Open Knowledge” acknowledges, “setting the default to open is an essential step toward making our system for producing and distributing knowledge more inclusive”.

Following on the heels of Wellcome Trust setting up Wellcome Open Research in 2016 – which publishes scholarly articles reporting any basic scientific, translational and clinical research that has been funded (or co-funded) by Wellcome – a group of funders have come together to launch AMRC Open Research:

AMRC screenshot

This is a platform “for rapid author-led publication and open peer review of research funded by AMRC member charities” – which include Parkinson’s UK, Stroke Association, Alzheimer’s Research UK and many more.

All articles benefit from immediate publication, transparent refereeing and the inclusion of all source data

If you are an SGUL researcher in receipt of a grant from these funders, take a moment to look at How it Works.

The AMRC platform levies relatively minimal charges  for publication by researchers funded by the participating charities – much lower than the cost of publishing in traditional journals (see Wellcome is going to review its open access policy blog post, March 2018).

Any questions about making your publications open access, please visit our Open Access FAQs or contact us on openaccess@sgul.ac.uk

For any questions about sharing or preserving data, please visit our Research Data Management pages or contact us on researchdata@sgul.ac.uk

Jennifer Smith

Research Publications Librarian


If you are interested receiving updates from the Library on all things open access, open data and scholarly research communications, you can subscribe to the Library Blog using the Follow button or click here for further posts from us.

The GDPR and health research

St George’s researchers will already be aware of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and the new UK Data Protection Bill, which will govern how we handle personal data after 25 May 2018. While we have learnt a lot about our obligations under the new regulations, researchers may not be clear about what these obligations mean for research. The SGUL Joint Research and Enterprise Services (JRES), Governance and Legal Assurance Services and the Research Data Management Service have come together to clear up a number of misconceptions about what the new regulations may mean for health and social care research. Read on!

It is not clear how the GDPR relates to health and social care research

GDPR has a broad scope beyond clinical research but does relate to all personal data which includes web search engines, social media, and much more.  Specifically, data required in research (and the way it is managed) would be within its remit. Identifiers such as name, addresses, date of birth, and electronic medical numbers all constitute personal information. However, the GDPR expands the personal data definition to include information such as location information, genetic data and IP addresses. In sum, any data that could potentially be used to directly or indirectly identify a person is considered personal data. In addition, pseudonymised data will now be considered personal data and therefore governed by the GDPR.

We will have to change all of our research processes to meet the requirements of the GDPR

As many, including the Medical Research Council, have already acknowledged, the GDPR reiterates many of the key principles of good research practice when handling personal data. Research, particularly health research, is governed by very strict guidelines and many of the mechanisms currently in place for assuring good practice can provide the safeguards needed to comply with the GDPR, for example, our ethics procedures and data management plans already address many of the requirements for privacy impact assessments and privacy by design. What we need to ensure is that all of our research is included in these processes, not just our funded research.

The GDPR will stifle research innovation

The GDPR ensures that innovation in health research can continue, but with the appropriate safeguards for data subjects. The new Data Protection Bill (which will replace the current Data Protection Act 1998) is currently going through parliament. This will direct the way the GDPR is implemented within the UK and any specific exemptions or “derogations”. It is widely accepted, but yet to be confirmed, that clinical research will have a number of related derogations to ensure that we are able to carry on normally with the business of improving and transforming health.

The research community will not be able to re-use/re-purpose data for future research

We are aware that it is not always possible to know all the ways research data could be processed when we are collecting it. The legislation also recognises this. Article 6(4) allows for further processing of personal data beyond the purposes for which it was collected, as long as those operations are considered ‘compatible’ with the original purpose under which consent was given, for example, medical research.

Further, secondary processing of data not collected for research, can subsequently be used for research, as long as appropriate safeguards are met and the processing is in the public interest. This means we can continue to access health data to better understand and treat health conditions.

I am going to have to re-consent participants every few years if I want to continue to hold their personal data

Consent is not the lawful basis on which our researchers hold and process personal data. As a public authority, we will usually process personal data for health and social care research as a ‘task in the public interest’, as such your participants may not need to be re-consented under the GDPR. However, under GDPR you will need to ensure you have been lawful, fair and transparent about the personal data you have collected and how it is managed. It is important to understand what information has been provided to your participants already and does this meet the GDPR requirements for transparency and accountability. This may require updates to your participant information sheet, or the addition of an information leaflet. The Health Research Authority (HRA) is working on consistent templates and wording to support researchers and sponsors have confirmed, if required, this would be a non-substantial amendment, that is, one not requiring formal ethics approval.

Even though consent is not the legal basis for processing personal data for research, the common law duty of confidentiality is not changing, so consent is still needed for people outside the care team to access and use confidential patient information for research. Therefore, consent continues to be required to meet the high ethical and research governance expectations we place on our researchers.

How can I be fair and transparent?

Being fair and transparent with research participants means respecting their rights and wishes, and ensuring their personal data is used in line with their expectations.  The GDPR requires that the information provided should be concise and easy to understand. If you want to retain information you should state the reason and allow the participant to make that judgement.

Organisations should also display corporate level privacy information about their research in locations where it will be noticed, for example links on website homepages and in waiting rooms. Linking this to your information sheets is a good way of ensuring participants are aware of our institutional role in research.

The JRES is working on updating template documents such as protocol templates and information sheets, to ensure appropriate guidance is provided and considered during the development of our research.

My funder expects me to make my data openly available at the end of my project, the GDPR will prevent me from doing this

The GDPR does not preclude data sharing, it only requires that data is shared responsibly and robustly. This has always been the case with data sharing. The GDPR only covers data that personally identifies a living person. Research that does not involve personal data is not covered under the GDPR and can be shared. The legislation also does not cover data that has been appropriately anonymised according to the ICO’s Anonymisation Code. This is what the ICO calls de-identified data for publication. There are also options to share de-identified data for limited disclosure or access. The ICO Anonymisation Code covers different forms of data publication and the Research Data Management Service is available to discuss your options.

A participant has requested to withdraw from the study but my data has already been anonymised and analysed; I have to start all over

In exceptional circumstances research participants are exempted from erasure if it is “likely to render impossible or seriously impair the achievement of the objectives of that processing” (Article 17(3)(d)). So you can continue to use this data in some circumstances. For data that has already been thoroughly anonymised, the GDPR does not apply.

The responsibility for GDPR compliance falls solely on project teams

The responsibility for compliance is corporate, that is, the organisation is accountable to the ICO, so it is important that researchers do not make decisions about legal compliance alone.

For St George’s University initiated research, we will usually be the data controller. This means we are responsible for outlining what data needs to be collected, why and how it is to be used/managed. For studies we collaborate in (where we are not the lead) we may be the data processor. In this instance, we are being directed on the data requirements and management.

If you are in doubt you should check as this is particularly important if a research participant asks you about their personal data rights.

 

We hope this post has helped you to get better acquainted with how the new legislation will affect our research activities. With regards to health and social care research, the GDPR maintains existing best practice and we should use this opportunity to evaluate our systems and procedures to ensure that we are indeed engaging in good practice.

Queries about the GDPR not covered here can be emailed to dataprotection@sgul.ac.uk.


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Get a Unique Researcher ID for Free and Help Identify Your Research Outputs

What is ORCID?

ORCID
Image from: https://members.orcid.org/sites/default/files/28-banners.png

ORCID stands for Open Researcher and Contributor ID

  • Creating an ID is free
  • The ORCID registry is maintained by a not for profit organization, funded through organizational membership and subscription fees

Why should I get one?

You can create a unique, persistent identifier which you can use to better identify yourself with your research outputs, such as publications and data sets.

  • It links you together with all your publications, whatever version of your name they are published under. That means if you change your name, or a different variation of it is used (eg middle name or initial), your publications will still be linked to your identity and will be collected in your ORCID record. And, what’s more, you can continue to use the same ID when you change organisations.

 

  • It’s also useful for clarifying which publications aren’t yours but have been published by someone with the same name – especially helpful if there’s someone with a similar name in the same field or the same organization as you.

 

  • It can link to many different types of research outputs, including datasets and software, as well as journal articles, meaning that you can easily get credit for all your published work.

 

  • ORCID integrates with a variety of other systems, such as funder applications and publisher manuscript systems, saving you from having to put the same information over again (see the section Who can see the information? below to find out how this works). Some actually require ORCID IDs, such as the Wellcome Trust’s grant applications system (and here’s some more on why they made that choice).

 

ref
Image from: http://www.ref.ac.uk/

ORCID and REF

The recent REF 2021: Decisions on staff and outputs says “The funding bodies consider that the benefits offered by persistent staff identifiers are significant, in terms of increased efficiency, transparency and interoperability in the research data landscape.” While not mandated for REF 2021, ORCIDs look likely to be required for future funding assessments, and HEFCE “strongly encourage” an ORCID ID to be provided for Category A submitted staff in REF 2021.

ORCID and CRIS

There will be some exciting developments with SGUL’s CRIS later this year when the CRIS is upgraded. If you have an ORCID ID, CRIS will retrieve records from data sources that have the ORCID ID in their metadata (such as Europe PubMed Central, PubMed, Web of Science). Once you have confirmed that the ORCID ID is yours, CRIS will retrieve any future records from those data sources with that ORCID ID in their metadata, and automatically add the records into your publications list.

How do I get an ORCID?

If you haven’t already got one, go to the ORCID website and click “Register now”. You can add your professional information and any other identifiers you might have to your account.

Who can see the information?

  • You control the content in your ORCID, who can see it
  • There are three visibility settings : everyone, trusted parties, or only me. Visibility to items can be set individually. For more information see Visibility settings
  • If you are happy to have the information visible to anyone, you can set visibility to ‘everyone’.
  • This means the profile will be visible via the orcid.org website, and importantly can be searched for via the API, which means the data can be reused.
  • If you want to be able to let the data update across systems that are registered /integrated to use ORCID data, then set it to ’trusted parties’
  • You can register your ORCID record with Research Fish, and this will enable you to add publications in your Research Fish portfolio to your ORCID record (so if it is in Research Fish, it will be included then in ORCID). Also you can use the publications search in Research Fish to fetch publications from ORCID and add them to your Research Fish portfolio.

Useful links:

Building your ORCID record and connecting your iD

ResearcherID & ORCID Integration – how to associate ORCID with ResearcherID

EPMC: How do I link my articles to my ORCID?

 

Jennifer Hughes, Research Publications Assistant

Jennifer Smith, Research Publications Librarian

Contact: openaccess@sgul.ac.uk


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Confused about Creative Commons licences?

Creative Commons licences offer a range of options for licensing your work, allowing you to share your work on your own terms. They’re intended to be straightforward, making it easy for you to control how your work is used and to understand what you can do with other people’s work.

The following graphic explains the different variations available:

CC(Creative Commons licenses explained ©Foter (adapted by Jisc) via Foter blog CC BY-SA)

The most permissive license available is the CC0 license, which allows anyone to copy, publish, modify or adapt the work, or change the license, without requiring that the original work be attributed.

The CC-BY license allows other people to copy, publish, modify or adapt your work, as long as you are credited – this is the license you’ll probably need to publish under if your work is funded and you’re publishing with immediate open access. (There’s more information on the library website about publishing open access and paying the fees for open access publication.)

The CC BY license can also be modified with one or more of the following terms:

  • ND (“No derivatives”): this prevents the work from being modified or adapted without permission from the copyright holder.
  • NC (“Non-commercial”): this prohibits commercial use of the work without permission from the copyright holder.
  • SA (“Share Alike”): means that any new works created using the work must be under the same licence as the original work was.

Making your work open access under licenses such as these benefits the research community by making knowledge accessible to everyone, enabling greater participation in research, and using Creative Commons licenses helps other people understand how they’re allowed to use your work.

To see some examples of what open research is enabling, take a look at SPARC’s website Open In Order To… And if you want to know more about open access at SGUL, email openaccess@sgul.ac.uk or visit our open access webpage.

Jennifer Hughes

Research Publications Assistant


If you are interested receiving updates from the Library on all things open access, open data and scholarly research communications, you can subscribe to the Library Blog using the Follow button or click here for further posts from us.

Open Access: Green and Gold

St George’s researchers: read on to find out how to make research open access, and how to win a £30 Amazon voucher…

There are two different ways to make your research articles open access: the green route and the gold route.

Green Open Access

Green Open Access: What is it?

Green open access means making your research articles freely available via a subject or institutional repository (such as SORA, SGUL’s institutional repository), after any embargo period required by the publisher has passed.

What do I need to do?

When your article is accepted for publication, create a basic record in the CRIS (Current Research Information System for St George’s Researchers) and upload your author’s accepted manuscript to it. . (This is the version after any changes resulting from peer review, but before the publisher’s formatting and copy editing.) We will then check the record and apply any embargo period before making it live in SORA.

For more guidance, please log in to your CRIS profile and click on the Help tab at the top right hand side.

If you have any questions, see our website or contact sora@sgul.ac.uk

 

Gold Open Access

Gold Open Access: What is it?

Gold open access means making your research articles freely available on the publisher’s website when they’re published, usually under a license which allows for reuse.

What do I need to do?

Find out if the journal you’re publishing in has an open access option, and then see if you have any funding available to pay for it.

Some publishers offer discounts or waivers for SGUL researchers: check our page on open access fees to see if any of them apply to you.

If your research is funded:

RCUK and COAF (a partnership of six health research charities) have provided us with funds to make articles arising from that research open access. To find out if you’re eligible, see our website or email openaccess@sgul.ac.uk

If your research is funded by another grant, check with your grants officer to see if there are any funds in it for open access publications.

If your research is unfunded:

Consider applying to our new Institutional Fund for open access publication fees – see the link on our open access webpage.


 

Open Access Week Competition

Win a £30 Amazon voucher: follow our Twitter account @sgullibrary to enter our competition on this year’s OA week theme “Open in order to…”  – tell us why you think ‘Open’ is good. (See our blog post and Terms and Conditions for how to enter).


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