Presenting: (new) Pubmed interface

PubMed users will have noticed a new version of Pubmed, which will become the default after 18 May 2020.

How to access the new Pubmed

Customised versions of PubMed make it easier to access the full-text of articles where they are available.

NHS users should use the following link, to access content available through OpenAthens: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?otool=igbsgnhslib

Staff and students of St George’s, University of London should use the following link to access content available through your university login: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?otool=igbsgulllib

What’s new?

Changes to the site have primarily been made in order to offer an updated and more responsive PubMed, that provides the same experience and tools for users across all types of devices, from laptops to tablets and phones. Find out more about the transition from old to new here.

Some of the key changes to how results are presented include:

  • A new and improved best match, which is now the default sorting
  • A new summary view for results, which includes snippets from the abstract of each article

A new user guide and FAQs are available on the PubMed home page, or can be accessed directly here, and any questions, comments or other feedback can be shared using the Feedback button at the bottom of the new site. For those wishing to keep up to date with enhancements and changes to PubMed as they happen, follow the New and Noteworthy page.

There is lots of online training available for Pubmed. Their tutorials and on-demand course for the new interface are particularly useful.

How to find articles in Pubmed

Best search practices in the new PubMed remain the same as the legacy system:

  • To find articles by topic, enter your keywords or phrases into the search box and let PubMed’s term mapping do the work for you. Remember to be specific, don’t use quotation marks, search tags, or boolean operators, and avoid truncation (*)
  • To find articles by citation, enter the citation elements you have (author, title words, journal, volume, year, etc.) and let the citation sensor find the article for you
  • To find articles by author, search the author’s last name and initial(s)
  • To find articles by journal, use the complete journal title, ISSN or title abbreviation

During these uncertain times, we continue to provide support to all at St George’s. Whether you are NHS staff, a student or a researcher, don’t hesitate to get in touch and we will be able to advise. Email us at liaison@sgul.ac.uk.