JISC releases “Roles and Responsibilities for Staff Using Images for Teaching and Research” Guide

Copyright word cloud

JISC Digital Media have released a guide on the the use of images for teaching and research.

It contains information on copyright, a process chart for users of digital images, guidance on the stages in the clearance of images for use in teaching and research, and more.

The Future of Thinking: Learning Institutions in a Digital Age

Authors: Cathy N. Davidson and David Theo Goldberg, with Zoë Marie Jones. Published by MIT Press, March 2010. From their website:
“Over the past two decades, the way we learn has changed dramatically. We have new sources of information and new ways to exchange and to interact with information. But our schools and the way we teach have remained largely the same for years, even centuries. What happens to traditional educational institutions when learning also takes place on a vast range of Internet sites, from Pokemon Web pages to Wikipedia? This report investigates how traditional learning institutions can become as innovative, flexible, robust, and collaborative as the best social networking sites. The authors propose an alternative definition of “institution” as a “mobilizing network”—emphasizing its flexibility, the permeability of its boundaries, its interactive productivity, and its potential as a catalyst for change—and explore the implications for higher education.

The Future of Thinking reports on innovative, virtual institutions. It also uses the idea of a virtual institution both as part of its subject matter and as part of its process: the first draft was hosted on a Web site for collaborative feedback and writing. The authors use this experiment in participatory writing as a test case for virtual institutions, learning institutions, and a new form of collaborative authorship. The finished version is still posted and open for comment. This book is the full-length report of the project, which was summarized in an earlier MacArthur volume, The Future of Learning Institutions in a Digital Age.

The book is also freely available as a download under a creative commons licence.

2010 Horizon report highlights emerging technologies for HE

From The Educause website:
” The annual Horizon Report  is a collaborative effort between the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) and the New Media Consortium (NMC). Each year, the report identifies and describes six areas of emerging technology likely to have a significant impact on teaching, learning, or creative expression in higher education within three adoption horizons: a year or less, two to three years, and four to five years.
The areas of emerging technology cited for 2010 are:
Time to adoption: One Year or Less

  • Mobile Computing
  • Open Content

Time to adoption: Two to Three Years

  • Electronic Books
  • Simple Augmented Reality

Time to adoption: Four to Five Years

  • Gesture-based Computing
  • Visual Data Analysis

Each section of the report provides live Web links to examples and additional readings. “

2009 Horizon report highlights likely impact of emerging technologies in HE

From their website http://connect.educause.edu/:

“The annual Horizon Report is a collaborative effort between the New Media Consortium (NMC) and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI). Each year, the report identifies and describes six areas of emerging technology likely to have a significant impact on teaching, learning, or creative expression in higher education within three adoption horizons: a year or less, two to three years, and four to five years.
The areas of emerging technology cited for 2009 are:
• Mobiles (i.e., mobile devices)
• Cloud computing
• Geo-everything (i.e., geo-tagging)
• The personal web
• Semantic-aware applications
• Smart objects
Each section of the report provides live Web links to examples and additional readings. An executive summary is also provided. The report can be downloaded here:
http://connect.educause.edu/Library/ELI/2009HorizonReport/48003

Database Discovery: Primal Pictures (Anatomy.tv)

What is it and how can it help me?
Primal Pictures (Anatomy.tv), produced by Primal Pictures (http://www.primalpictures.com/), provides a very detailed interactive model of the human anatomy, and features 3-D animations that illustrate function, biomechanics, and surgical procedures.  The software allows you to rotate structures, manipulate the images, and view different layers to provide a cross-sectional view of different parts of the anatomy. Clinical videos and textual descriptions by leading specialists supplement the animations and models. Interactive learning modules covering basic human anatomy focus on one or more areas of the body, from a generalist’s or specialist’s perspective. Quizzes are also included to test knowledge.

What is the coverage?
Modules cover the following topics:

3D Head & Neck with Basic Neuroanatomy
Interactive Head & Neck
Interactive Spine including a Clinical & Chiropractic Editions
Interactive Shoulder including a Sports Injuries Edition
Interactive Thorax & Abdomen
Interactive Hip
Primary Hip Arthroplasty
Interactive Pelvis & Perineum
Interactive Knee including a Surgery Edition
Primary Knee Arthroplasty
Interactive Knee including a Sports Injuries Edition
Interactive Foot & Ankle including a Sports Injuries Edition
Podiatric Medicine & Surgery
Interactive Hand including a Therapy Edition

Interactive Functional Anatomy
Anatomy Trains
Complete Human Anatomy Study Guide
Anatomy for Acupuncture

How do I access it?
Primal Pictures is available within Ovid Online. Various routes are possible:

– For on-site access direct link here
– Login to MyAthens; from the Resources tab, select Ovid Online, from the list of databases, select Primal Pictures.
– Via the Library website > Databases

It is also available to St. George’s Hospital staff via Ovid Online with your NHS Athens password

Can I re-use any of the Primal Pictures content?

For educational use only by University staff and students, images, videos, text etc can be copied and used in documents, presentations, but please acknowledge the source.

In addition, content can also be used in Moodle or the University Intranet/Portal. Please note that if we cancel our subscription to Primal Pictures then any online content must be removed.

ERIC re-designs Website

From the ERIC website http://www.eric.ed.gov
“The new ERIC Web site features several enhancements that will make the experience of using the site easier and faster for individual researchers, along with improvements to aid librarians in supporting ERIC users. These enhancements include improved navigation, expanded help and training, an information area for librarians, and a lighter visual design”