New NHS e-learning programme on literature searching now available


A new e-learning programme providing guidance on how to plan and carry out literature searches is now available on the e-Learning for Healthcare (e-LfH) platform. The project is intended for both clinical and non-clinical healthcare staff, and aims to help develop confidence in searching for and identifying relevant articles in support of work, study and research.

The seven module course is specifically for those with less experience in searching healthcare databases for literature, or those who wish to refresh their knowledge of the principles of effective searching. Each of the short modules can be completed in 20 minutes or less, and have been designed such that they might be used individually, or completed as a course.

The first three modules titled, ‘Building the Foundations’, were launched in November of 2017 and provide users with some guidance on the resources that are available, how to get started with planning a search, and the use of OR/AND in combining search terms.

The second set of three modules, ‘Developing the skills’, has recently been made available, and these focus on how to narrow a search when too many results are returned, how to broaden searches with too few results, as well as covering how to search using subject headings.

The seventh and final module on ‘Applying the skills’ will be available in April 2018.

You can access the modules password-free, but if want to record and save your learning, log in via NHS OpenAthens. To access the e-learning  visit:


Saving Your MyiLibrary ebook notes before the Ebook Central Upgrade



On 21st March all e-books on the Myilibrary platform will move to a new platform called Ebook Central. Unless you save any notes you have made in MyiLibrary ebooks before 21st March you will lose them after the upgrade.

Here’s how to save any notes you have made in MyiLibrary ebooks you have read online (not in books you’ve downloaded).

Step 1: Log in to MyiLibrary.

Step 2: Select My Account at the top of the home page, then select Notes from the drop-down menu. You will see the list of books you have added annotated notes to.

Step 3: Select the titles from which you want to preserve your notes.

Step 4: Choose to either print your notes or email them to yourself. If you choose to email your notes, you will receive an HTML-based message from that includes the book titles, the page numbers associated with your notes, and the note titles. Also included will be a link to each note page in MyiLibrary, although these links will not be valid once the Ebook Central upgrade is complete.

For further information contact the library at or visit the Research Enquiries desk from 11am – 4pm Monday to Friday in the library.

to Hunter for more features

Sign in - web banner

Hunter – the library’s search tool – does more than allow you to search across the Library’s print and electronic resources. You can use Hunter to save useful resources, manage your library account and request items that the library doesn’t hold. All of these features can be activated by signing in to Hunter before you start your search.

Remember: SGUL students and staff should use their SGUL username and password. NHS staff can obtain their login by emailing or calling the Library Helpdesk on 020 8725 5466 (between 8am – 6pm Monday to Friday).

to:

Check item details
Place holds
Manage your account
Add items to your e-Shelf
Save your searches
Request an inter-library loan


Check item details

If you are searching Hunter for a print book, the Locations tab will give you more details about the item’s availability:


If you want to identify the loan period for each copy (i.e. find out if they are 1 or 3 week loans), click the ‘Sign-in for more options’ link and you’ll be prompted to login:


Once signed in, you’ll be able to see the loan period for each copy of the book.



Place holds

If all copies of the book that you want are out on loan, you can place a hold on that book. When a copy becomes available, you will be notified by e-mail to come and collect it from the Library Helpdesk.

The ‘Locations’ tab will tell you if there are any copies available. If all the copies have the status ‘On Loan‘, you’ll need to sign-in to Hunter in order to place a hold on the book. Click the ‘Sign-in for more options‘ link:


Enter your login details when prompted. Then click the ‘Place Hold‘ link which has now become active:


Click on the ‘Request’ button to confirm the hold. You’ll then be notified of your place in the Holds queue:


You can view or cancel your hold requests by using the ‘My Account‘ link in the top right-hand corner of Hunter and clicking on the ‘Requests‘ tab:



Manage your account

As well as viewing and managing your hold requests (see above) you can use the My Account feature to:

  • View your current loans and check their due dates.
  • Check your account for any outstanding overdue fines.
  • Change the display settings to view more results per page.
  • View your previous loan history.


You’ll see in the top left two other tabs. These will allow you to save individual search results by adding them to your e-Shelf, and to save useful searches for later.


Add items to your e-Shelf

If you find a useful resource when searching Hunter that you want to save for later, click the star next to the title:


This will turn the star orange and add the item to your e-Shelf.

You can retrieve it, and any other records you have saved, by clicking the e-Shelf link in the top right-hand corner of the page…


…or by clicking the e-Shelf tab when logged in to your account.

Anything you ‘star’ will be added to this folder. You can manage and organise them (perhaps by topic, or by assignment) into separate folders if you find this useful.



Save your searches

You can also save a whole page of search results to your e-Shelf in one go. Click the ‘Add page to e-Shelf’ link inn the bottom left hand corner of the page.


Above that is an option to ‘Save search’. Click on this to save your search terms in your account, so that you can run the search again at a later date. You’ll be prompted to give the search a name:


You can also save the search as an ‘alert’. When new papers that match your search terms are added to Hunter, you’ll be emailed a list of them to your registered email address.

You can view and manage these searches in the ‘Searches’ tab of your account.


Request an inter-library loan

If you are unable to find a book or journal article in our collections, we may be able to obtain a copy for you from a different library*. More details on the inter-library process can be found here:

You’ll find the online form to request an inter-library loan in the top right-hand corner of Hunter. The link will remain greyed out until you sign-in:


*charges may apply.
For more help with any of these features, or using Hunter to find resources, please email the Liaison Team on or visit the Research Enquiries Desk between 11am and 4pm, Monday to Friday.

Fines Amnesty in aid of SGSU Rag Week

fines test

On Friday 9th and Monday 12th February 2017, all overdue fines* paid at the Library Helpdesk (between 8am – 6pm) will be donated to SGSU’s RAG week.

So come along to the Library, pay your fines and do your bit for charity!

More information about RAG week events can be found on the SGSU RAG Facebook page:

*Excludes invoice payments for lost or damaged library stock.

Taylor & Francis Medical Library – free journals trial

We now have a 2 month trial of over 200 peer-reviewed academic journals from Taylor and Francis, ending 31st March.

For more information on titles available, access routes and how you can feedback your views on the collection, see our Resource trial page:

Confused about Creative Commons licences?

Creative Commons licences offer a range of options for licensing your work, allowing you to share your work on your own terms. They’re intended to be straightforward, making it easy for you to control how your work is used and to understand what you can do with other people’s work.

The following graphic explains the different variations available:

CC(Creative Commons licenses explained ©Foter (adapted by Jisc) via Foter blog CC BY-SA)

The most permissive license available is the CC0 license, which allows anyone to copy, publish, modify or adapt the work, or change the license, without requiring that the original work be attributed.

The CC-BY license allows other people to copy, publish, modify or adapt your work, as long as you are credited – this is the license you’ll probably need to publish under if your work is funded and you’re publishing with immediate open access. (There’s more information on the library website about publishing open access and paying the fees for open access publication.)

The CC BY license can also be modified with one or more of the following terms:

  • ND (“No derivatives”): this prevents the work from being modified or adapted without permission from the copyright holder.
  • NC (“Non-commercial”): this prohibits commercial use of the work without permission from the copyright holder.
  • SA (“Share Alike”): means that any new works created using the work must be under the same licence as the original work was.

Making your work open access under licenses such as these benefits the research community by making knowledge accessible to everyone, enabling greater participation in research, and using Creative Commons licenses helps other people understand how they’re allowed to use your work.

To see some examples of what open research is enabling, take a look at SPARC’s website Open In Order To… And if you want to know more about open access at SGUL, email or visit our open access webpage.

Jennifer Hughes

Research Publications Assistant

New Year Review

The Library in Numbers: 2017

With 2018 underway, we’ve taken the opportunity to reflect on the past year. Here we present a roundup of activity from the past 12 months in our New Year Review infographic. Throughout 2017 we supported NHS, SGUL and FHSCE researchers, staff and students, developed our collections and introduced exciting changes to the Library:

New Year Review

On the 4th of September the Library opened its doors for 24/7 opening hours, meaning that users could use the space whenever they needed to. In October we launched St George’s Data Repository – a digital archive where users can store, share and discover research output produced at St George’s. Just weeks before the New Year we upgraded Hunter and the library management system. This brings with it many new features, including automatic renewals.

Throughout the year the Library has been very busy. We recorded 524,522 visits in 2017 – that’s over 1437 visits on average per day! We purchased 2,388 books and e-books to add to the Library collection and you, the user, borrowed books 117,231 times.

We were also on hand to support you. As well as our host of information skills training workshops, we saw 831 new students in September for inductions and helped 542 attendees at IT training sessions.

We were also engaged with supporting NHS and University researchers. SORA, St George’s Open Access repository, has 2210 freely available full-text items and 1,823 average monthly downloads were recorded. Our librarians conducted 113 Cares searches to support research and evidence based practice. You, our users, were also busy. You downloaded 615,538 e-journal articles last year – that’s an average of over 50,000 articles every month!

Happy New Year from the team at St George’s Library.