Pop-up Library, Thursday 16 May

To support the recent addition of BMJ Best Practice to the resources of St George’s trust staff, the Library will be hosting a pop-up stand in the restaurant in Lanesborough Wing this Thursday.

BMJ Best Practice offers access to the current information required to inform decisions on prevention, diagnosis and treatment, structured to mirror the patient consultation.

With a personal account, the tool can also automatically track your activity across topics to demonstrate your learning and professional development.

Come along between 12.00 – 2.00 p.m. on Thursday to ask any questions that you may have, and to try out the Best Practice app for yourself.

Links to Best Practice can be found on the Library’s NHS webpage, A-Z list of databases and NICE Evidence Service’s OpenAthens resource list.

To support you in getting started, download the user guide or visit the FAQ section. If you need any more information, please contact the library on liaison@sgul.ac.uk, ext 5433 or email support@bmj.com.

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Challenging but rewarding – Wellcome Trust Data Re-use Prize winner, Quentin Leclerc, on reusing open data

Last November the Wellcome Trust launched the Data Re-use Prize to celebrate innovative reuse of open data either in antimicrobial resistance (AMR) or malaria. Entrants were asked to generate a new insight, tool or health application from two open data resources, the AMR ATLAS dataset or the Malaria ROAD-MAP dataset.

MRC-LID PhD student and member of the winning team for AMR, Quentin Leclerc, dropped by the SGUL RDM Service to talk about the prize and the challenging but rewarding process of reusing open data.

Quentin, congratulations on the win. Can you tell me a little bit about your team’s entry for the Data Re-Use Prize?

Sure. We developed a tool to help inform empiric therapy. Empiric therapy is basically when physicians pool multiples sources of data together to make the best informed guess about how to treat a patient. This is before they know exactly what bacteria a patient is infected with and its potential resistance to antibiotics. Say, for example, a patient has sepsis and needs to be treated right away. A physician might determine the most likely causes as E.coli and S. aureus infection and then make an informed guess about the best antibiotic to prescribe to treat both of these bacteria, bearing in mind regional estimates of each of pathogen’s resistance to different antibiotics. The physician is basically thinking, “given what we know about the common causes of this condition and antibiotic resistance, which antibiotic is likely to work best?”

Our proof of concept web app integrates data from a range of open data sources to visualise antibiotic resistance rates for common infections to help physicians prescribe faster and more accurately. If developed, the tool can potentially be used to inform national guidelines on how to treat common infections in many countries, particularly in low and middle income counties where data aren’t always available to inform empiric therapy at the local or hospital level.

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Some visualisations from the team’s AR.IA app

Sounds very exciting. As a first year PhD student, what was it like to win a prize like this?

It was really unexpected. We didn’t expect to win, we just thought, ‘we’ll publish our findings anyway so let’s see how this goes’. The other entries for the prize were very specific while our entry was pretty broad so we weren’t very confident. It was a real surprise and a great effort from everyone on the team.

Team photo
Team photo (l to r): Gwen Knight, Quentin Leclerc, Nichola Naylor and Alexander Aiken
Missing: Francesc Coll

As a PhD student, it was an interesting experience overall. This project is very different from my PhD but working on this tool helped me to get used to the various datasets out there and to look at the big picture of antimicrobial resistance and antibiotic prescribing. It was an enlightening process.

Can you tell me a little bit more about the process of reusing existing data? What was it like?

It was surprising. The thing with data is that it’s collected for a purpose. When someone comes in trying to use that data for a different purpose, they start to see what’s missing. They start to make approximations and assumptions to use the data for something it wasn’t intended for. The ATLAS dataset is very accurate and it’s very rich but it suits its original purpose. For example, we needed to group the data in increasingly complex ways. Once we started doing this, the sample sizes started to look quite small. The dataset wasn’t suited to those kinds of groupings.

When we started comparing the ATLAS dataset to other datasets, the AMR data appeared to show slightly different information. So we started to ask, who collected this data? In what contexts would this data have been collected? Might there be a sampling bias that explains this difference we’re seeing between the datasets? There was a legitimate reason for the difference we were seeing, but that’s why it’s really important to think about why you’re using a dataset and exactly what you want to achieve because the data may not suit your purpose.

Also, we integrated data from a range of sources. When you start doing this, comparing available datasets, you realise the heterogeneity of the data that’s out there; they are all in different formats, they have different naming conventions, even the bacteria aren’t named in the same way and we had to work out exactly which bacteria different datasets were referring to. There aren’t any standards across the different sources to make integrating the datasets easy.

So there were a lot of challenges to reusing data that someone else created?

Yes, we needed to keep in mind that the data was not created to answer our research question. We also found that there was a lack of information in the available literature around the common causative pathogens of several infections to help us understand and use the data correctly.

What advice would you give to researchers wanting to reuse open datasets but are hesitant?

It is important to look at the dataset and really understand it. Ask yourself why it was collected, where it was collected, how it was collected. Don’t take anything for granted. Open datasets are incredible resources but you can’t blindly go in there.

Once you understand the dataset you’ll naturally get the confidence to use it and ask the right questions of it. You won’t be scared or overwhelmed by it. You’ll also save a lot of time once you start working on the data and better understand how to combine it with other datasets.

Quentin and his team’s winning entry, Antibiotic Resistance: Interdisciplinary Action (AR:IA), is openly available here. The team was led by Dr Gwen Knight at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and included Nichola Naylor, Francesc Coll and Alexander Aiken.    

If you have any questions about finding and reusing open data contact Michelle Harricharan, Research Data Support Manager.

UPDATE 03/05/2019: You can read the official SGUL news release on this prize here.

Library Easter Opening Hours 2019

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We’re pleased to announce that the Library will remain open 24/7
over the Easter Bank Holiday weekend!

Please be aware will be operating self-service only during these times and
you will need to make sure you bring a valid ID card to access the Library.

Library staff will be unavailable from:
6pm on Thursday 18th April
until
8am on Tuesday 23rd April.

 

New for Trust staff- BMJ Best Practice

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Did you know that access to BMJ Best practice is now provided by Health Education England to all George’s Trust staff ? Login via your OpenAthens account to access this excellent new resource.

What is BMJ Best Practice?

BMJ Best Practice is a clinical decision support tool, uniquely structured around the patient consultation, with advice on symptoms, evaluation, tests to order and treatment approach. The resources cover thousands of clinical topics and over 6,000 clinical guidelines. Access is available anywhere, with online or offline access via the BMJ Best Practice App. You can even  use it to demonstrate learning as it tracks  your searches for clinical information for CPD/CME.

How can Trust staff access BMJ Best Practice?

Follow these 3 easy steps to get started:

Step 1 Access BMJ Best Practice

  1. Visit https://bestpractice.bmj.com/
  2. Sign in with your OpenAthens username via the ‘Log In’ Link

To register for an OpenAthens account, go to openathens.nice.org.uk or contact the library on liaison@sgul.ac.uk

Step 2 Set up a personal account

A personal account gives you access to extra features such as the app and the ability to track CPD/CME activity and download certificates. You will be prompted to create a personal account on your first visit.

Step 3 Download the app  bmj-best-practice-2017-app

First, make sure you have completed step 2 and created a personal account

  1. Search for ‘BMJ Best Practice on the App Store or Google Play
  2. Select the app and start the download
  3. Enter your personal account login details to complete the download.

Links to Best Practice can also be found on the Library’s NHS webpage, A-Z list of databases and NICE Evidence Service’s OpenAthens resource list.

To support you in getting started, download the user guide or visit the FAQ section. If you need any more information, please contact the library on liaison@sgul.ac.uk, ext 5433 or email support@bmj.com.

 

Information Skills Training Sessions April – June 2019

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Dates for our April – June 2019 Information Skill Training Sessions are below. Please see our Information Skills Training page for full details. Contact liaison@sgul.ac.uk to book a session.

Getting Results: Finding healthcare literature for your learning and research

This session is for SGUL/FHSCE students and staff who are carrying out more in-depth research, such as for a literature review, dissertation, research project etc.

Recommended for: SGUL/FHSCE staff and students

Tuesday 16th April 10:00 -11:30

Thursday 2nd May 13:00 -14:30

Wednesday 15th May 9:30 -11:00

Wednesday 12th June 14:00 -15:30

Systematic reviews – Finding and managing the evidence

Systematic literature searching for systematic reviews, research projects or service developments.

Recommended for: NHS staff & researchers

Sessions available on request.
Please email liaison@sgul.ac.uk

Introduction to critical appraisal

Introduction to the concepts of critical appraisal and evaluating healthcare literature.

Recommended for: NHS staff & researchers

Sessions available on request.
Please email liaison@sgul.ac.uk

Citation metrics – an overview

An overview of traditional and alternative metrics, with the opportunity for hands on exploration of a range of metrics.

Recommended for: Researchers or SGUL/FHSCE staff and students

Thursday 6th Jun 12:00 – 13:00

Finding the evidence

Introduction to healthcare resources and training in how use them effectively to support evidence-based clinical practice or decision-making.

Recommended for: NHS staff

Friday 19th April 12:00 – 13:30

Tuesday 14th May 11:00 -12:30

Wednesday 26th June 13:00 – 14:30

Library Inductions for NHS Staff

Recommended for: NHS staff

Wednesday 3rd April 10:00 – 11:00

Wednesday 1st May 10:00 – 11:00

Wednesday 5th June 10:00 – 11:00

Keeping up-to-date

Introduction to a range of services that will help you keep up to date with current literature.

Recommended for: NHS staff & researchers

Please email liaison@sgul.ac.uk to book your bespoke session

Getting Started with Twitter

A session for those new to Twitter, offering a hands-on practical workshop exploring this growing social media platform, with particular focus on how Twitter can be used in a professional context.

Recommended: For anyone wanting to get familiar with Twitter

Tuesday 18th June 10:00-11:30

Refworks

Recommended for: SGUL/FHSCE staff and students
Sessions available on request.
Please email liaison@sgul.ac.uk

 

Personalised training

If you cannot make any of the times, we are happy to arrange sessions for either individual or larger groups depending on your needs. To organise a bespoke session please email us at liaison@sgul.ac.uk

Placing Holds: a quick guide

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Books that are out on loan can be reserved in a few quick steps using the Library’s search tool, Hunter.

After finding the book you want, select Check availability of print copies to find out whether it’s available:

new check availability box

If all copies are out on loan, you’ll be able to reserve a copy. Just follow the three steps below:

no 1 fadeIf you haven’t already, sign in to Hunter.

1 sign in cut

  • SGUL staff and students can sign in with their SGUL username and password
  • NHS staff can find out their Hunter login by asking at the Library helpdesk or emailing library@sgul.ac.uk

no 2 fadeAfter you sign in, a Place hold option appears. Click here…

2 place hold cut

no 3 fade…and select Request

3 select request

Hunter confirms that your hold is placed:

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When a copy of the book becomes available you’ll receive an email, and will then have one week to collect it from the Library Helpdesk.

IT Training is recruiting – Microsoft Teams Champions

220px-Microsoft_Teams_logoIT Training @SGUL is now recruiting a committed team of students from a cross section of courses to support Microsoft Teams adoption.

We are seeking dynamic Microsoft Teams Champions to train, support and give guidance to staff and students on various devices using Microsoft Teams. This will be rolled-out across the University on various activities in education and research projects which in turn will support your employability.

Champions will not be recruited solely on digital capabilities, we are looking for individuals that have the ability to work as part of a team and the confidence to teach and support others, coupled with promoting the usage of Microsoft Teams across the University.

 

Job title: Microsoft Teams Champion

Requirements

Essential:

  • Technology and Microsoft Office confident
  • Enjoy working with people
  • Must be keen to champion change and enhance the student experience through learning technology, using Microsoft Teams
  • Enthusiastic and forward thinking
  • Good customer service skills
  • Able to communicate effectively to help users apply Microsoft Teams to their situation

Desirable:

  • Familiar with PC and Mac

 

Responsibilities

  • Train staff/students on Microsoft Teams
  • Attend a two hour workshop on how to use Microsoft Teams and input into how it could benefit the University
  • Identify where Microsoft Teams can be used
  • Actively use Microsoft Teams to help drive adoption with peers
  • Assist in welcoming new users, by providing guidance and best practice
  • Request feedback to improve support and guidance
  • Collaborate with project lead and other Microsoft Teams Champions using Microsoft Teams hub to share ideas and give feedback
  • Build Microsoft Teams awareness and engagement across the University with peers and staff

 

Rate of pay: £10.55 p/h

Time commitment: 9 hours consisting of:

  • 2 hour workshop on how to use Microsoft Teams plus a 1 hour follow-up meeting to answer questions and agree training schedule
  • 6 hours of delivering training to new users, divided into small sessions – 1 hour per session delivered at different times.

 

This link will take you to the application form

 

The closing date for applications is Friday 22nd March 2019 and interviews are expected to commence the week beginning: 1st April 2019

If you have any questions, please email fgraham@sgul.ac.uk