Hunter Upgrade: Important Information

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Over the weekend of December 2nd & 3rd 2017, the Library system including Hunter will be upgraded.

Important Information regarding loss of service

What this upgrade means for you:

SGUL Students and Staff

NHS Staff

Important information regarding your e-Shelf


Important information regarding loss of service during the upgrade

Please note that between 18:00 on Friday 1st December and 09:00 on Tuesday 5th December the following services will be unavailable whilst we transition to the new library system:

  • Borrowing books & other items
  • Viewing/renewing your loans
  • Paying fines
  • Hunter & the Library Catalogue
  • Self-service machines

Items due to be returned to the library or renewed between 1st – 5th December will not be fined.

It will still be possible to return books via the Book Returns Slot in the lift lobby next to the Library.


What this upgrade means for you:

SGUL Students and Staff

The look of Hunter and how you search will not change but when logged in to Hunter, using your SGUL log in, you will benefit from the following enhancements:

  • View full availability information immediately for print and e-resources as the Library Catalogue will be fully integrated within Hunter
  • View and update your loans & holds (i.e. reservations)
  • Place inter library loan requests
  • Review any fines
  • Up to 10 automatic renewals, unless another user has placed a hold on your item

NHS Staff

From Tuesday 5th December your library account can only be accessed by signing in to Hunter, the library’s search tool, where you will be able to renew your books, place reservations and view fines.

To sign in to your library account after the upgrade, you will need the following:

a BARCODE – this will be the 10-digit barcode number on the front of your staff ID Badge or Library Access card

a PASSWORD – this will be your case sensitive surname, as registered with the library

When signed in to Hunter, you will benefit from the following enhancements:

  • View full availability information immediately for print and e-resources as the Library Catalogue will be fully integrated within Hunter
  • View and update your loans & holds (i.e. reservations)
  • Place inter library loan requests
  • Review any fines
  • Up to 10 automatic renewals, unless another user has placed a hold on your item

Access to the university’s collection of e-journals will still largely remain on-campus only after the 5th December, unless you are attached to an academic programme, have a University honorary title or joint contract.

You will still need an NHS OpenAthens account to access NHS e-resources such as e-books, literature search databases or journals from any computer or device with internet access.


Important information regarding your e-Shelf

Your e-Shelf will function in the same way. However, unfortunately the contents of your e-Shelf cannot be automatically transferred across to the new system.  Therefore, you will need to:

  1. Before the upgrade – keep a separate email list of any items on your e-Shelf that you want to restore after the upgrade eg articles, books; saved searches and alerts, ideally before Wednesday 29th November.
  2. After the upgrade – manually restore the content to your e-Shelf using your list

You can find instructions for performing step 1 here. Further details on performing stage 2 will be posted at a later date.

Closer to the upgrade date we will provide more details of all the changes you will see in Hunter. Look out for more information on the improvements we are making here on the blog, on our social media channels and on the Library website.

If you have any queries please email liaison@sgul.ac.uk

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Stories from St George’s: The Gunpowder Mill Worker

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This guest post is written by Dr Carol Shiels,
Museum Curator and Senior Lecturer at St George’s, University of London.

The anniversary of the failed Gunpowder plot is celebrated each year with fireworks and bonfires. If the plot had succeeded, the 36 barrels of gunpowder would have resulted in an explosion that would have destroyed Westminster. In this blog article we get an insight into the world of gunpowder production from an account of a patient at St George’s Hospital in 1850.

In London, a major site of gunpowder production was the Hounslow Powder mills, near Twickenham, in what is now Crane Park. In 1850 a large explosion occurred and a 21-year-old labourer was injured . He was only 5 metres away from the blast site and as a result of the explosion a beam fell on him and flames enveloped him as the loose gunpowder on his face and clothes caught fire. He was able to throw himself into one of the nearby rivers and was taken to St George’s Hospital at Hyde Park Corner. He was admitted to the hospital with his face black, his skin scorched and blistered and his hair and beard burnt away in places.  His major injury was a broken elbow joint; the pointed end of his elbow (part of the ulna) had broken off and the ulna was also fractured into three splinters.

Broken bones in the 19th century were often a life-threatening injury. Caesar Hawkins, a senior surgeon at St George’s, decided to amputate the arm just above the elbow joint. A few years previously this would have been a severe and painful operation, but the recent use of chloroform as an anaesthetic during surgery meant he had a pain free operation. It went well with little blood loss and the patient had an uneventful but restless night. He was given opium to help with the pain and over the next few days his arm healed well with no swelling. Unrelated to the accident, the patient had a bad cough, producing dark coloured foamy sputum. When questioned by Caesar Hawkins, he described this as commonplace in the men working in the charcoal house at the mill. This is most likely to be due to the inhalation of carbon dust from charcoal production and, as the patient confirmed, led to the early death of many workers at the mill.

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The elbow joint from the patient. It has been fixed in formaldehyde and displayed in a glass jar. This has been maintained in the Museum for 167 years.

Caesar Hawkins retained the patient’s elbow joint and added it to the collection of pathological specimens in St George’s Museum. He had discovered a piece of loose cartilage in the joint during the operation and described this as looking like a ‘bicuspid tooth from which the fangs had been removed’. Loose pieces of cartilage can be painful and can make movement of the affected joint difficult. Caesar Hawkins wrote an account of the case and it was published in a 1850 volume of the Lancet. Both the patient’s elbow joint and this early edition of the Lancet are still part of the St George’s Museums and Archives collections.

Such accidents were not uncommon and 55 explosions were reported at the same powder mill over its working life; some described as being like an earthquake.  It is likely that many workers ended up at St George’s as a result of these accidents and their stories will be uncovered with further exploration and research into our Museums and Archives collection.

 


If you are interested receiving updates from the Library and the St George’s Archives project, you can subscribe to the Library Blog using the Follow button or click here for further posts from the Archives.

Gruesome and Ghostly: Tales from St George’s Archives

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To mark Halloween, our archivist Carly Manson, held two historical tours involving gruesome artefacts from our Archives and Special Collections.  Amongst the artefacts on display were a cloth used to wrap the dead body of King George II, and records relating to a scandal that provoked Charles Dickens to condemn post-mortem practices as “shocking”.

The history of each object on display was shared by the archivist, and the audience encouraged to ask questions. It was fantastic to learn about these fascinating artefacts and to see so many interested people in the audience.

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The artefacts from the events are also featured in this week’s Times Higher Education, in their article ‘The spooky secrets of London’s oldest medical school’:

https://www.timeshighereducation.com/blog/spooky-secrets-historic-uk-medical-school

 


If you are interested receiving updates from the Library and the St George’s Archives project, you can subscribe to the Library Blog using the Follow button or click here for further posts from the Archives.

Hunter – how to save items on your e-Shelf to a backup email list

Below are two sets of instructions – the first to save any items on your e-Shelf to an email, and the second to save any saved searches.

Save items on your e-Shelf:

  1. Log into Hunter
  2. Go to your e-Shelf
  3. Select the items ie books, articles etc that you wish to save
  4. Click Email option (top right of your e-Shelf items listing)
  5. In the Send by email popup window, enter your email address and click Send
  6. Very shortly, the email should be delivered to your inbox – check that all your items are listed

Save your Hunter saved searches:

Please note that it is not possible to ‘export’ your searches – the only means to keep a record is by copying and pasting each row into another file, such as an email or word document.

  1. Log into Hunter
  2. Go to your e-Shelf
  3. Click on the Searches tab
  4. For each of your searches, run the search
  5. You can then copy and paste each row of your search into another file

If you have any queries please email liaison@sgul.ac.uk

Open Access: Green and Gold

St George’s researchers: read on to find out how to make research open access, and how to win a £30 Amazon voucher…

There are two different ways to make your research articles open access: the green route and the gold route.

Green Open Access

Green Open Access: What is it?

Green open access means making your research articles freely available via a subject or institutional repository (such as SORA, SGUL’s institutional repository), after any embargo period required by the publisher has passed.

What do I need to do?

When your article is accepted for publication, create a basic record in the CRIS (Current Research Information System for St George’s Researchers) and upload your author’s accepted manuscript to it. . (This is the version after any changes resulting from peer review, but before the publisher’s formatting and copy editing.) We will then check the record and apply any embargo period before making it live in SORA.

For more guidance, please log in to your CRIS profile and click on the Help tab at the top right hand side.

If you have any questions, see our website or contact sora@sgul.ac.uk

 

Gold Open Access

Gold Open Access: What is it?

Gold open access means making your research articles freely available on the publisher’s website when they’re published, usually under a license which allows for reuse.

What do I need to do?

Find out if the journal you’re publishing in has an open access option, and then see if you have any funding available to pay for it.

Some publishers offer discounts or waivers for SGUL researchers: check our page on open access fees to see if any of them apply to you.

If your research is funded:

RCUK and COAF (a partnership of six health research charities) have provided us with funds to make articles arising from that research open access. To find out if you’re eligible, see our website or email openaccess@sgul.ac.uk

If your research is funded by another grant, check with your grants officer to see if there are any funds in it for open access publications.

If your research is unfunded:

Consider applying to our new Institutional Fund for open access publication fees – see the link on our open access webpage.


Open Access Week Competition

Win a £30 Amazon voucher: follow our Twitter account @sgullibrary to enter our competition on this year’s OA week theme “Open in order to…”  – tell us why you think ‘Open’ is good. (See our blog post and Terms and Conditions for how to enter).

 

Open Access Open Research

SGUL’s open access institutional repository SORA now has over two thousand full text publications written by SGUL researchers freely available online, a great milestone for SGUL to celebrate in International Open Access Week 2017.

On average there are over 1800 downloads of papers per month from SORA, the papers are indexed in SGUL’s Hunter, and in Google for maximum discoverability:

Screenshot of St George's Online Research Archive website

Win a £30 Amazon voucher: follow the library’s Twitter account @sgullibrary to enter our competition on this year’s OA week theme “Open in order to…” – tell us why you think ‘Open’ is good. (See our blog post and Terms and Conditions for how to enter).

Open access publication is a requirement of many of the big funders in biomedical and life sciences research due to its role in making research more accessible, more discoverable and more impactful1.

On the 4th October the Wellcome Trust released a new science strategy, Improving health through the best research. In it, they reaffirm their commitment to open research:

“Scientific knowledge achieves its greatest value when it is readily available to be used by others. And if knowledge generated with Wellcome support can be used for the improvement of health, it should be.”

Open research is an umbrella term bringing together a variety of efforts to make scientific research transparent and reproducible, and to increase its impact on policy, practice and technological advances. Open access publication is an important part of open research, helping to make research outputs accessible and useable by anyone. Another key tenet of open research is open data, and St George’s has recently launched a data repository to enable researchers to share, store and preserve their research content.

Queen’s University, Belfast, has put together some examples of how open access has benefitted their researchers.


For further information, please visit our open access webpage or contact openaccess@sgul.ac.uk.

 

1 The Open Access Citation Advantage Service, SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) Accessed 19 October 2017

 

Open in order to…

The theme of this year’s International Open Access Week, which runs from 23rd-29th October, is “Open in order to…”. This year the focus is on thinking about possibilities are opened up by making research outputs open access.

Win a £30 Amazon voucher: follow the library’s Twitter account @sgullibrary to enter our competition on this year’s OA week theme “Open in order to…” – tell us why you think ‘Open’ is good. (For terms and conditions, and how to enter, see the end of this post.)

Open in Order to Open Access banner for 2017

Here are some reasons why research is made “open in order to…”

…improve public health

Breakthroughs in medical science are frequently in the news, but the research publications underpinning the headlines are often locked away behind a publisher’s paywall. For example, the research article referred to in this recent article from the BBC  is currently only available to subscribers to the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and many publications cited in the recent award of the Nobel Prizes for Chemistry and Physics are not publicly accessible. By contrast, a recent study by SGUL researchers on meningitis in children was published in an open access journal, meaning that the full article can be read by anyone, anywhere in the world, at any time.

Open access research allows anyone who is interested to read and evaluate the research for themselves. This might include:

  • Medical professionals wanting to improve patient care;
  • Members of the public wanting to learn more about a condition they have;
  • Journalists wanting to report more accurately on the story;
  • Policy makers;
  • Researchers whose institutions don’t subscribe to the journal the research is published in, or who are operating outside an institution.

Opening up research helps improve public health by increasing access to academic research.

 

…raise the visibility of my research

Studies1 have consistently shown a citation advantage for open access publications over closed access ones. Depositing your work in a repository increases the avenues by which your research can be discovered, as well as helping readers to follow your research from paper to paper more easily by collecting them all together.

 

…enable global participation in research

Making research open enables all researchers to access it and removes the financial barrier for those working in less well funded institutions, as well as independent researchers working outside institutions. Making your data and publications accessible for free and licensing it under terms which allow for reuse means that other researchers can pick up on and build on your research, benefitting the global research community as a whole.

 

…find new collaborators

Making your work open helps researchers on related topics find it and identify possibilities for collaboration. Open access can also promote cross-disciplinary working by making it easier for researchers to access work outside their own discipline.

1 The Open Access Citation Advantage Service, SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) Accessed 19 October 2017

 

How to enter:

Follow @sgullibrary on Twitter and complete the phrase “Open in order to…” using the hashtag #openinorderto and @sgullibrary’s Twitter handle.

Terms and Conditions:

  1. The competition will run from Monday 23 October 2017 until Sunday 29 October 2017.
  2. The prize draw is open to anyone with a valid SGUL ID.
  3. Winners will be chosen from all valid entries once the competition has closed on Sunday 29 October 2017.
  4. Winners will be contacted via Twitter. Be sure to check your account.
  5. The prize can only be collected in person from St George’s Library on production of a valid ID card.
  6. Prizes must be collected within two weeks of notification.
  7. The Judges’ decision is final and no correspondence will be entered in to.
  8. Photos of the prize winners will be taken to be used in publicity on Library media channels.
  9. One prize winner will be selected, unless the prize is not collected by the deadline, in which case the uncollected prize will be reselected (once only).
  10. Your tweets may be reused by St George’s Library for future promotional or informational purposes.
  11. Entries must contain the hashtag #openinorderto and must tag the library’s Twitter account @sgullibrary.

 


To find out more about open access, contact openaccess@sgul.ac.uk or visit the Library open access webpages.