New Year Review

The Library in Numbers: 2017

With 2018 underway, we’ve taken the opportunity to reflect on the past year. Here we present a roundup of activity from the past 12 months in our New Year Review infographic. Throughout 2017 we supported NHS, SGUL and FHSCE researchers, staff and students, developed our collections and introduced exciting changes to the Library:

New Year Review

On the 4th of September the Library opened its doors for 24/7 opening hours, meaning that users could use the space whenever they needed to. In October we launched St George’s Data Repository – a digital archive where users can store, share and discover research output produced at St George’s. Just weeks before the New Year we upgraded Hunter and the library management system. This brings with it many new features, including automatic renewals.

Throughout the year the Library has been very busy. We recorded 524,522 visits in 2017 – that’s over 1437 visits on average per day! We purchased 2,388 books and e-books to add to the Library collection and you, the user, borrowed books 117,231 times.

We were also on hand to support you. As well as our host of information skills training workshops, we saw 831 new students in September for inductions and helped 542 attendees at IT training sessions.

We were also engaged with supporting NHS and University researchers. SORA, St George’s Open Access repository, has 2210 freely available full-text items and 1,823 average monthly downloads were recorded. Our librarians conducted 113 Cares searches to support research and evidence based practice. You, our users, were also busy. You downloaded 615,538 e-journal articles last year – that’s an average of over 50,000 articles every month!

Happy New Year from the team at St George’s Library.

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Holiday Checklist

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Wherever you’re going to be over the next few weeks, our online resources and other services can help you keep studying. Here are three quick steps to consider before you leave SGUL to make this as straightforward as possible.

  1. Reset your SGUL password
  2. Bring books to the library to renew
  3. Register to study in a library near you

1. Reset your SGUL password

With your SGUL login and password, you can use our journals and e-books, and online resources such as Acland’s Anatomy from anywhere with internet access.

We recommend you reset your password before you leave as this ensures you won’t need to change it again for 3 months.

If your password expires or you’ve forgotten it, you can usually reset it from offsite. Note: you must have already set up an external email address and if you don’t receive the reset link, check your junk mail folder.

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For a refresher on finding online resources, have a look at our Hunter FAQs.
We also have a step by step guide to accessing e-resources from offsite [PDF].

2. Bring books to the Library to renew

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Return and reissue your books to extend your renewal limit

Books and other items you have borrowed from us will now be automatically renewed 10 times, unless another library user has requested them.

To make sure you don’t reach your 10 renewal limit while you’re away from SGUL, we recommend bringing items into the Library so you can return and reissue them on our self-service machines before you leave.

3. Register to study in a library near you

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SGUL Library is a member of the SCONUL scheme, which allows our users reference access to around 170 other university libraries across the UK and Ireland. Postgraduates may also get limited borrowing rights in some cases.

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To use the scheme,  follow the steps on the SCONUL Access page. Within a few days, and provided there are no fines on your Library account, you’ll receive an email from us which you can take to your chosen library along with your SGUL ID card to apply for access.

Like SGUL, many academic institutions in the UK and worldwide use Eduroam for WiFi. If  you are near a university and have WiFi enabled on phone or laptop, you should immediately pick up the network. If you are using Eduroam for the first  time, remember to enter your full SGUL username (including @sgul.ac.uk) and password.

Our website library.sgul.ac.uk is a great jumping off point for accessing the services and resources mentioned in this post.

Hunter Upgrade – New Features

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Information for SGUL students and staff
Information for NHS staff

 

Information for SGUL students and staff

Hunter has now been upgraded and the search function is the same as the previous version, except that on the drop-down menu the option to search for books, previously called Library Catalogue, has changed to ‘Books & more’.

Although Hunter can still be searched without signing in, SGUL students and staff need to sign in to Hunter using your normal SGUL username and password in order to benefit from the following enhancements:

  • View full availability information immediately for print and e-resources, including all books
  • View and update your loans and holds
  • Review any fines
  • Place interlibrary loan requests

You can sign in by clicking on the sign in option on the top right hand side of the screen.  Select SGUL staff and students from the options on the next screen then type in your SGUL username and password when requested:

New Features

Automatic renewals
The items that you have on loan will be automatically renewed 10 times before you need to return them.  The exception to this is if someone else has reserved the item, in which case you will need to return it by the due date.  You will receive a notification by email if this is the case.

My Account – display settings
You can change your display settings via My Account (the option to the right of your e-Shelf) so that you can display more than 10 results per page. Select My Account > Personal Settings > Display Settings.

For further information, please see the Hunter FAQs

Information for NHS staff

Hunter has now been upgraded and the search function is the same as the previous version, except that on the drop-down menu the option to search for books, previously called Library Catalogue, has changed to ‘Books & more’.

Although Hunter can still be searched without signing in, NHS staff need to sign in to Hunter in order to benefit from the following enhancements:

  • View full availability information immediately for print and e-resources, including all books
  • View and update your loans and holds
  • Review any fines
  • Place interlibrary loan requests

You can sign in by using your Library account. If you do not know the sign in details for your Library account, this can be obtained by contacting the Library at library@sgul.ac.uk.

Click on the sign in option on the top right hand side of the screen.  Select NHS staff from the options on the next screen then use the username and password of your Library account.

New Features

Automatic renewals
The items that you have on loan will be automatically renewed 10 times before you need to return them.  The exception to this is if someone else has reserved the item, in which case you will need to return it by the due date.  You will receive a notification by email if this is the case.

My Account – display settings
You can change your display settings via My Account (the option to the right of your e-Shelf) so that you can display more than 10 results per page. Select My Account > Personal Settings > Display Settings.

For further information, please see the Hunter FAQs

#AMillionDecisions NHS Pop-up Library: Wednesday 29th November 12-2pm, Ingredients Restaurant

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Every day more than a million decisions are made across the NHS and healthcare sector. Under the Health and Social Care Act 2012, there is a responsibility for health services to ensure use of evidence obtained from research to inform these decisions.

#AMillionDecisions is a campaign from CILIP and Health Education England, calling for decisions in the health care sector to be fully evidence based.

In support of the St George’s Trust’s Quality Improvement Week, 27th November – 1st December, we’re highlighting how St George’s Library can help staff make those million decisions evidence-based at our pop up library stall on Wednesday 29th, 12-2pm.

The Library provides a wide range of  free information services with the aim of  providing timely and efficient access to information to underpin quality healthcare provision.

These services range from providing access to high-caliber relevant e-resources and training on how to search for and critically appraise information, to CARES, our Clinical and Research Enquiry Service.

To find out more, visit our pop-up library stall on Wednesday 29th November, 12-2pm, Ingredients Restaurant, Level 1, Lanesborough Wing or join the campaign by sharing your thoughts and experiences on Twitter using the hashtag #AMillionDecisions.

Hunter Upgrade: Important Information

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Over the weekend of December 2nd & 3rd 2017, the Library system including Hunter will be upgraded.

Important Information regarding loss of service

What this upgrade means for you:

SGUL Students and Staff

NHS Staff

Important information regarding your e-Shelf


Important information regarding loss of service during the upgrade

Please note that between 18:00 on Friday 1st December and 09:00 on Tuesday 5th December the following services will be unavailable whilst we transition to the new library system:

  • Borrowing books & other items
  • Viewing/renewing your loans
  • Paying fines
  • Hunter & the Library Catalogue
  • Self-service machines

Items due to be returned to the library or renewed between 1st – 5th December will not be fined.

It will still be possible to return books via the Book Returns Slot in the lift lobby next to the Library.


What this upgrade means for you:

SGUL Students and Staff

The look of Hunter and how you search will not change but when logged in to Hunter, using your SGUL log in, you will benefit from the following enhancements:

  • View full availability information immediately for print and e-resources as the Library Catalogue will be fully integrated within Hunter
  • View and update your loans & holds (i.e. reservations)
  • Place inter library loan requests
  • Review any fines
  • Up to 10 automatic renewals, unless another user has placed a hold on your item

NHS Staff

From Tuesday 5th December your library account can only be accessed by signing in to Hunter, the library’s search tool, where you will be able to renew your books, place reservations and view fines.

Sign in details for your library account can be obtained by contacting the library.

When signed in to Hunter, you will benefit from the following enhancements:

  • View full availability information immediately for print and e-resources as the Library Catalogue will be fully integrated within Hunter
  • View and update your loans & holds (i.e. reservations)
  • Place inter library loan requests
  • Review any fines
  • Up to 10 automatic renewals, unless another user has placed a hold on your item

Access to the university’s collection of e-journals will still largely remain on-campus only after the 5th December, unless you are attached to an academic programme, have a University honorary title or joint contract.

You will still need an NHS OpenAthens account to access NHS e-resources such as e-books, literature search databases or journals from any computer or device with internet access.


Important information regarding your e-Shelf

Your e-Shelf will function in the same way. However, unfortunately the contents of your e-Shelf cannot be automatically transferred across to the new system.  Therefore, you will need to:

  1. Before the upgrade – keep a separate email list of any items on your e-Shelf that you want to restore after the upgrade eg articles, books; saved searches and alerts, ideally before Wednesday 29th November.
  2. After the upgrade – manually restore the content to your e-Shelf using your list

You can find instructions for performing step 1 here. Further details on performing stage 2 will be posted at a later date.

Closer to the upgrade date we will provide more details of all the changes you will see in Hunter. Look out for more information on the improvements we are making here on the blog, on our social media channels and on the Library website.

If you have any queries please email liaison@sgul.ac.uk

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Stories from St George’s: The Gunpowder Mill Worker

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This guest post is written by Dr Carol Shiels,
Museum Curator and Senior Lecturer at St George’s, University of London.

The anniversary of the failed Gunpowder plot is celebrated each year with fireworks and bonfires. If the plot had succeeded, the 36 barrels of gunpowder would have resulted in an explosion that would have destroyed Westminster. In this blog article we get an insight into the world of gunpowder production from an account of a patient at St George’s Hospital in 1850.

In London, a major site of gunpowder production was the Hounslow Powder mills, near Twickenham, in what is now Crane Park. In 1850 a large explosion occurred and a 21-year-old labourer was injured . He was only 5 metres away from the blast site and as a result of the explosion a beam fell on him and flames enveloped him as the loose gunpowder on his face and clothes caught fire. He was able to throw himself into one of the nearby rivers and was taken to St George’s Hospital at Hyde Park Corner. He was admitted to the hospital with his face black, his skin scorched and blistered and his hair and beard burnt away in places.  His major injury was a broken elbow joint; the pointed end of his elbow (part of the ulna) had broken off and the ulna was also fractured into three splinters.

Broken bones in the 19th century were often a life-threatening injury. Caesar Hawkins, a senior surgeon at St George’s, decided to amputate the arm just above the elbow joint. A few years previously this would have been a severe and painful operation, but the recent use of chloroform as an anaesthetic during surgery meant he had a pain free operation. It went well with little blood loss and the patient had an uneventful but restless night. He was given opium to help with the pain and over the next few days his arm healed well with no swelling. Unrelated to the accident, the patient had a bad cough, producing dark coloured foamy sputum. When questioned by Caesar Hawkins, he described this as commonplace in the men working in the charcoal house at the mill. This is most likely to be due to the inhalation of carbon dust from charcoal production and, as the patient confirmed, led to the early death of many workers at the mill.

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The elbow joint from the patient. It has been fixed in formaldehyde and displayed in a glass jar. This has been maintained in the Museum for 167 years.

Caesar Hawkins retained the patient’s elbow joint and added it to the collection of pathological specimens in St George’s Museum. He had discovered a piece of loose cartilage in the joint during the operation and described this as looking like a ‘bicuspid tooth from which the fangs had been removed’. Loose pieces of cartilage can be painful and can make movement of the affected joint difficult. Caesar Hawkins wrote an account of the case and it was published in a 1850 volume of the Lancet. Both the patient’s elbow joint and this early edition of the Lancet are still part of the St George’s Museums and Archives collections.

Such accidents were not uncommon and 55 explosions were reported at the same powder mill over its working life; some described as being like an earthquake.  It is likely that many workers ended up at St George’s as a result of these accidents and their stories will be uncovered with further exploration and research into our Museums and Archives collection.

 


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