IT Training is recruiting – Microsoft Teams Champions

220px-Microsoft_Teams_logoIT Training @SGUL is now recruiting a committed team of students from a cross section of courses to support Microsoft Teams adoption.

We are seeking dynamic Microsoft Teams Champions to train, support and give guidance to staff and students on various devices using Microsoft Teams. This will be rolled-out across the University on various activities in education and research projects which in turn will support your employability.

Champions will not be recruited solely on digital capabilities, we are looking for individuals that have the ability to work as part of a team and the confidence to teach and support others, coupled with promoting the usage of Microsoft Teams across the University.

 

Job title: Microsoft Teams Champion

Requirements

Essential:

  • Technology and Microsoft Office confident
  • Enjoy working with people
  • Must be keen to champion change and enhance the student experience through learning technology, using Microsoft Teams
  • Enthusiastic and forward thinking
  • Good customer service skills
  • Able to communicate effectively to help users apply Microsoft Teams to their situation

Desirable:

  • Familiar with PC and Mac

 

Responsibilities

  • Train staff/students on Microsoft Teams
  • Attend a two hour workshop on how to use Microsoft Teams and input into how it could benefit the University
  • Identify where Microsoft Teams can be used
  • Actively use Microsoft Teams to help drive adoption with peers
  • Assist in welcoming new users, by providing guidance and best practice
  • Request feedback to improve support and guidance
  • Collaborate with project lead and other Microsoft Teams Champions using Microsoft Teams hub to share ideas and give feedback
  • Build Microsoft Teams awareness and engagement across the University with peers and staff

 

Rate of pay: £10.55 p/h

Time commitment: 9 hours consisting of:

  • 2 hour workshop on how to use Microsoft Teams plus a 1 hour follow-up meeting to answer questions and agree training schedule
  • 6 hours of delivering training to new users, divided into small sessions – 1 hour per session delivered at different times.

 

This link will take you to the application form

 

The closing date for applications is Friday 22nd March 2019 and interviews are expected to commence the week beginning: 1st April 2019

If you have any questions, please email fgraham@sgul.ac.uk

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International Women’s Day 2019

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Happy International Women’s Day!

There’s plenty of superb female writing talent in the Library, from our own St George’s academics, to classic and contemporary fiction writers. As we were celebrating reading for pleasure during World Book Day yesterday, we thought we’d mark #IWD2019 by pulling together a selection of female-authored fiction titles available in the Library.

You can find these and the rest of our fiction on the shelves at PN3353, but if you’d like to browse them online, click the image below. Each item is linked to its Hunter record, so you can check to see whether a copy is available to borrow. If it’s on loan, remember you can place a hold by signing in to Hunter:

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International Women’s Day is all about celebrating women’s achievements, so there’s no better day to mark the accomplishments of our first four female medical students. Admitted in 1915 due to a shortage of men during the First World War, two of them are pictured below. Helen Ingleby (L) & Hetty Ethelberta Claremont (R) went on to have successful careers in the medical profession.

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You can read more about ‘The First Women of St George’s’ in this interactive timeline. Click the image below for more details, or read our profile of pioneering female medics during the First World War.

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World Book Day 2019

WBD logo EYES TOP RIGHT.jpgHappy World Book Day! While Library staff aren’t dressing up like classic book characters (we hope you aren’t too disappointed), some of us have been reading and reviewing new and classic picks from our fiction collection.

You can browse online collections of these titles at the links below, or by searching for fiction in Hunter:

KU Big Read titles
LGBT History Month titles
Black History Month titles

 

On to the reviews!

 

Tin Man by Sarah Winman

A short but beautifully bittersweet story of grief, and the loves that preceded it.

A book of two halves, the narrative follows firstly Ellis and then transfers to Michael, childhood friends whose lives have diverged in adulthood. However, while being centred on the story of these two men, the book opens in 1950 with a woman and what is described as ‘her first ever act of defiance.’ The woman, instead of complying with her husband’s instruction to choose a bottle of whiskey upon winning a raffle draw at a local community centre event, chooses a reproduction painting of van Gogh’s Sunflowers. The woman is Dora Judd, Ellis’s mother, and both she and the painting are a thread woven through the story of these men’s lives, signifying the possibilities of committing to an act of hope – the choice to turn towards the light.

Winman’s prose is understated yet brimming with beauty and compassion, embodying one of the underlying themes of the novel – the beauty and potential inherent in the everyday.

Verity Allison, Journals and e-Resources Librarian

 

Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie

“For girls, becoming women was inevitability; for boys, becoming men was ambition”

Home Fire is a modern-day reworking of the Greek tragedy Antigone, centred around a British Muslim community who are dealing with the fallout of one their own leaving London to join ISIS. The story unfolds through a number of different perspectives; from siblings Isma, Aneeka and Parvaiz, to the Home Secretary Karamat Lone and his son Eamonn.

It is certainly an intense read, but an important one. Shamsie’s insidious descriptions of Parvaiz’s slide into radicalisation are heartbreaking and her characterisation of the British tabloid press is spot-on and desperately frustrating to read. Part-thriller, part homage to the power of love and family, the story builds and builds to a hugely cinematic climax. How satisfying you find the ending is very much up for discussion, but this is a read that has stuck with me for a long, long time after turning the last page.

Beth Jackson, Liaison Support Librarian

 

The English Patient by Michael Ondaatje

I first saw Anthony Minghella’s Oscar-winning film adaption of this book, and having subsequently heard the director talk about Michael Ondaatje’s beautiful writing I was intrigued. The book itself won the Booker Prize in 1992, and the Golden Man Booker Prize in 2018 – essentially being voted the best of the all previous Booker prize winners.

Set at the time of the Second World War, several lives entwine around an “English” patient who has badly been burned in an airplane accident. The back-story that unfurls is both romantic and heartbreaking.

I find it very hard to keep interested in books where I have already seen the film but Ondatjee’s writing really is special: he writes very poetically.  The plot is slightly different to the film which always makes it more interesting. I’d definitely recommend this book.

Daniel Jeffcote, Information Assistant

 

If you’d like some more recommendations, we’ve previously featured reviews written by FHSCE and Library staff. How about one reading one of our selected #KUBigRead shortlisted titles? You can find their reviews below:

The Penguin Lessons
The Elephant and the Bee
The Power
Radio Sunrise
The Brilliant and Forever
My Name is Leon

On the other hand, if you prefer a non-fiction read but aren’t in the mood for another Oxford Handbook, Library staff have also reviewed a selection of popular science writing. You can read our thoughts here.

Happy reading!

 


If you’d be interested in reading and reviewing any books from the Library collection, please do get in touch with us by emailing liaison@sgul.ac.uk

Pop-up Library: Thursday 7th March 12-2pm

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To mark World Book Day on Thursday 7th March, we’re hosting a lunchtime pop-up library outside the University reception. Come by the stall between 12pm and 2pm to borrow books, hear library staff book suggestions or make your own. We’ll have a range of books from fiction to medical bestsellers, with a particular focus on female writers in fiction and science to celebrate Academic Book Week (4-9 March) and International Women’s Day (8 March). Make sure you bring along your ID card to borrow a book.

St George’s Library in Numbers: 2018

2018 was a year of change for St George’s Library. We introduced a new library management system, which underpins the circulation of library items. In the summer, we upgraded Hunter’s interface for a more intuitive search tool. Alongside these changes, we introduced automatic renewals and additional loans. This means our users can now borrow more books for longer.

As well as improving access to resources, we continued to offer support to our users. Our new Subject Library Guides provide targeted online support to students and our refreshed information skills training sessions offer face-to-face workshops on a range of topics. Our institutional open access and research data repositories have continued to expand.

It’s not just the library staff who were busy in 2018. Our users made great use of the library: there was more footfall in the library, searches in Hunter and downloads of e-resources than in 2017. The info-graphic below shows some stats from the library in 2018. Click on the link underneath to download the PDF.

Resources

We developed our collection throughout the past year. We purchased 2246 new books which were added to the library shelves. After a successful trial of JOVE (Journal of Visualized Experiments) we added this resource to our subscribed databases. Library members ran 353,069 Hunter searches 2018 – that’s 29, 422* searches every single week! Well over half a million journal articles were downloaded, 691,858 to be precise, and 26,784 books were borrowed.

Services

Footfall was high last year and 45,000* of you visited the library every month. Over 1000 new students attended library inductions at the start of the year and many more students attended further library sessions throughout the year. The NHS Liaison team conducted 88 Cares searches to support clinical activity and decision making.

Research

St George’s Data Repository, powered by figshare, was launched in 2017. Last year, it gained 24 new public deposits and had 661* monthly views. St George’s Online Research Archive (SORA) had 2325* downloads per month and 2980 full-text items publicly available.

We’ve enjoyed looking back on 2018 but we’re also excited for what 2019 will bring. It’s not even mid-way through January and already we’ve seen the arrival of new self-service machines. These machines will make it easier to borrow multiple items – simply stack your books on top of each other and they will all be issued. As we increased the number of items that you could borrow last year, this new feature should come in handy!

*approximate average based on 2018 figures

Information Skills Training Sessions January – March 2019

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Dates for our January – March 2019 Information Skill Training Sessions are below. Please see our Information Skills Training page for full details. Contact liaison@sgul.ac.uk to book a session.

Getting Results: Finding healthcare literature for your learning and research

This session is for SGUL/FHSCE students and staff who are carrying out more in-depth research, such as for a literature review, dissertation, research project etc.

Recommended for: SGUL/FHSCE staff and students

Wednesday 6th Feb 11:00 -12:30

Wednesday 20th Feb 10:30 – 12:00

Thursday 7th March 11:00 -12:30

Monday 25th March 14:00 -15:30

Systematic reviews – Finding and managing the evidence

Systematic literature searching for systematic reviews, research projects or service developments.

Recommended for: NHS staff & researchers

Wednesday 23rd Jan 13:00-16:00

Wednesday 27th Feb 10:00-13:00

Wednesday 27th Mar 13:00-16:00

Introduction to critical appraisal

Introduction to the concepts of critical appraisal and evaluating healthcare literature.

Recommended for: NHS staff & researchers

Wednesday 30th Jan 15:00-16:30

Wednesday 20th Mar 10:30-12:00

Citation metrics – an overview

An overview of traditional and alternative metrics, with the opportunity for hands on exploration of a range of metrics.

Recommended for: Researchers or SGUL/FHSCE staff and students

Monday 21st Jan 12:00 – 13:00

Finding the evidence

Introduction to healthcare resources and training in how use them effectively to support evidence-based clinical practice or decision-making.

Recommended for: NHS staff

Monday 21st Jan 14:00 – 16:00

Wednesday 13th Feb 15:00-17:00

Thursday 21st Mar 14:00 – 16:00

Library Inductions for NHS Staff

Recommended for: NHS staff

Wednesday 2nd Jan 10:00 – 11:00

Wednesday 6th Feb 10:00 – 11:00

Wednesday 6th Mar 10:00 – 11:00

Keeping up-to-date

Introduction to a range of services that will help you keep up to date with current literature.

Recommended for: NHS staff & researchers

Friday 22nd March 14:00 – 15:30

Getting Started with Twitter

A session for those new to Twitter, offering a hands-on practical workshop exploring this growing social media platform, with particular focus on how Twitter can be used in a professional context.

Recommended: For anyone wanting to get familiar with Twitter

Tuesday 26th Feb 13:00 -14:30

Thursday 21st Mar 10:00 – 11:30

The following course is available on request, please email liaison@sgul.ac.uk for details

Refworks

Recommended for: SGUL/FHSCE staff and students

Personalised training

If you cannot make any of the times, we are happy to arrange sessions for either individual or larger groups depending on your needs. To organise a bespoke session please email us at liaison@sgul.ac.uk